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Presented to the 
LIBRARY of the 
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 

from 

the estate of 

J. Stuart Fleming 




THE PIONEERS’ LEGACY. 

By THE KHAN (B. K. Kernighian), 

Rockton, Ont. 

Our steps are growing feeble, our strength is failing fast; 

We give a New Year’s greeting and this may be the last. 

Once we were strong of thought and thigh, once strong of thumb 
and thew, 

Once we were as an army ; today we are so few. 

The open grave’s before us, the staff falls from each hand— 

To our children’s children and their children’s children we bequeath 
this land ! 

A land that’s big with beauty, a land that’s fair and free, 

A land in sweet tranquility, a land that’s good to see. 

Thriving towns and cities, smiling farms on every hand — 

To our children’s children and their children’s children we bequeath 
this land ! 

We came to build, and building, a mighty structure grew, 

And ever as we builded, builded better than we knew; 

And through the darkening wilderness, lo ! we were led in might, 
Our log heaps made a smoke by day, a pillared flame by night. 
Now, when across the continent we’ve seen our task expand, 

To our children’s children and their children’s children we bequeath 
this land ! 

Our country, 0 our country, the triumph of our toil! 

Unto her God we give our souls, our bodies to her soil. 

Standing by our graveside, this is our last command : 

For our children’s children and their children’s children thou shalt 
keep this land! 

No more we’ll feel the autumn leaves frosted ’neath our feet; 

No more we’ll see our fields and hills begoldened with the wheat; 
No more we’ll smell the apple bloom when spring is here again; 
No more we’ll bring the milch cows home along the darkening lane. 
The battle time is over, and we must now disband — 

To our children’s children and their children’s children we bequeath 
this land ! 

Lord, Thou who ledst us hither, still ever with us be ! 

Now lettest Thou Thy servants depart in peace to Thee ! 

Hear Thou our last weak prayer — we hold Thee by the hand — 
“For our children’s children and their children’s children, Lord 
God, keep this land!” 



ANCESTORS AND DESCENDENTS 



- OF — 

RICHARD GRIFFIN 

OF SMITHVILLE, ONT. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



WITH A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF SOME 
RELATED GRIFFIN FAMILIES 
IN CANADA. 



COMPILED BY 

JUSTUS A. GRIFFIN 



HAMILTON, ONT. 

THE GRIFFIN & RICHMOND CO. 

1924 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2015 



https://archive.org/details/ancestorsdescendOOgrif 



CANADA 



In all Britannia’s wide domains, 

In all the lands beneath the sun, 

Where is the land that can compare 
With that Canadians love and own? 

It stretches from Atlantic’s coasts 
To old Pacific’s sullen roar, 

From slavery’s land that freedom boasts 
To Arctic ocean’s icebound shore. 

’ Tis rich in stores of mineral wealth, 

In flocks and herds on grassy plain, 

In garden soil and orchard land, 

In waving fields of golden grain. 

In forests vast and mountains high, 

Where game is bred, where health is found , 

Its rivers grand and inland seas 
Its products bear, in fish abound. 

’Midst earth’s brave sons and daughters fair 
Her sons and daughters still excel ; 

Heirs of freedom, to freedom true 
From age to age shall safely dwell. 

For her our fathers fought and bled, 

And where they firmly made their stand 

Their heirs will ever ready be 

To hold their own, their fatherland, 

QEORQE D. QRIFFIN 

Waterdown, Canada West, 

December , 1856. 

(See No. 250) 



INTRODUCTION 



It is now considerably more than 30 years since the compiler 
of these annals commenced to gather material for a family 
history, and the accumulated information, including copies of 
wills and official documents, would fill a very large volume. The 
selection and condensing of this material to proportions suitable 
for the present purpose has been no easy task ; there was so much 
that called for insertion that had to be of necessity left out. He 
is indebted for much of the material to Messrs. Robert B. Miller, 
of New York; A. W. Griffen, of Omaha, an official of the United 
States Postal Service, and Z. T. Griffen, of Chicago. These gentle- 
men had exceptional opportunities to search old records and 
documents in the great libraries and official archives in the lead- 
ing cities of the United States, and spent much time in doing so. 
They furnished this writer with copies of documents and de- 
tailed accounts of the results of their work. They satisfied them- 
selves independently — I believe they never met — that Edward 
Griffin, of Flushing, was the Edward Griffin, or Griffith, who came 
with Capt. Clayborne’s party in 1635, and that decision has been 
accepted in these annals. 

Thanks are also due and are hereby tendered to the many 
correspondents who have courteously answered the questions 
asked of them, and to the others who have hospitably received 
personal calls and given the desired information as far as was 
possible. 

The compiler has been made more cautious in forming 
decided conclusions, with regard to persons and events narrated, 
by an experience in the early days of his geneological studies. 
Family records in direct line, of a reliable character, of Edward, 



6 



A PIONEEB FAMILY 



of Nine Partners, Duchess Co., New York, from the day of his 
birth in 1710, were available. But back of that was uncertainty ; 
a family tradition said that) his father was also an Edward of 
Long Island, and that he came from Wales. It now appears that 
it was his grandfather Edward who came from Wales. In or 
about 1889 certain papers prepared by one of the family were 
received from one of his heirs. He had read a book called 
“Griffin’s Journal,” written by a descendant of Jasper Griffin, 
of Southold, Long Island, who settled there in 1675. In it was 
the statement that Jasper had a son Edward, of whom nothing 
further was known. Our friend linked up this Edward with our 
geneolog} 7 and made him the father of Edward of Duchess Co. 
The present compiler, in the ignorance and simplicity of a be- 
ginner, adopted this without investigation, and on the suggestion 
of the late Colonel George Butler Griffin, of Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, sent the so-constructed geneology to the Geneological 
Register of New York. Shortly afterward facts were discovered 
which proved that statement to be incorrect. Much correspond- 
ence of an explanatory character has been a consequence of that 
error. 

In the following record the figures in parentheses after the 
names designate the generation of the family in America, com- 
mencing with the immigrant Edward (1). The figures preceding 
the names are consecutive numbers used for convenience in 
reference. 



PATRONYMIC 



Our family name originated in Wales, but soon spread 
throughout the British isles, and as long ago as the year 1547 
the name appears in numerous entries of marriages, births and 
deaths in the registers of many parishes in London, England, and 
its vicinity. There have been many modes of spelling the name, 
as is the case with a number of other family cognomens. Before 
me is a short account of an old English family, which contains 
some variations in spelling their name, for instance, in one legal 
document their family name is spelled in three different ways, 
and in a will written a generation later the writer made use of 
three other modes of spelling it. 

But the predominant manner of spelling our name during 
the past four hundred years is as spelled in this book, viz., 
“Griffin.” 

How many individuals of our name migrated to America 
during the first fifty years of the settlement of British people on 
this continent is hard to discover. But there are records in ex- 
istence which prove that there were probably scores of them. 
These settled in different sections, in Maine, in Massachusetts, 
in Connecticut, in New York, in Pensylvania, in Virginia and in 
other colonies. 

The first English settlement was in Virginia in 1609. The 
first settlement in New England was in 1620. I do not know in 
what year the first Griffin arrived, but by 1640 there were a 
great many of that name. I have the names of four who came in 
1635, by different ships and who settled in different sections, also 
one in 1633. I quote the following from the introduction to the 
geneology of the descendants of Matthew Griffin, of Charlestown, 
Mass. : ‘ 1 The name Griffin was a common one among the early 
settlers in New England. As early as 1660 there were six grow- 



8 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



ing families by that name in or north of Boston, and in but few 
cases are there proofs of relationship between them.” 

Humphrey Griffin, who resided in Ipswich, Mass., in 1639, 
was one of these early settlers. I am indebted for an account of 
his family to one of the descendants, Major-General Simon G. 
Griffin, of Keene, N. H., who distinguished himself as commander 
of a brigade under General Burnside and as a division commander 
under General U. S. Grant in the Civil War of 1861-5. After the 
war he was a member of New Hampshire State Legislature and 
for two years its speaker. In later life he was historian of the 
City of Keene and State Historian of New Hampshire. 

In the annals of Windsor, Conn., is a record of the marriage 
of John Griffin, of Simsbury, to Anna Bancroft, May 13, 1647. 
The names and dates of birth of their ten children are also given. 
This John Griffin is believed to be the one who came out in 
Captain Clayborne’s party, and probably a brother of Edward of 
Flushing, Long Island. 

In Harper’s Weekly of May 1, 1875, was a picture and an 
account of one Lomer Griffin, then living in Lodi, Ohio, and said 
to have been born in Connecticut, April 22, 1759. A correspond- 
ent of mine investigated the history of this man and found that 
Chedorlaomer Griffin, a great-great-grandson of Sergt. John 
Griffin, of Simsbury (Windsor), Connecticut, was born at Sims- 
bury, Conn., April 22, 1774, and died at Lodi, Ohio, in Oct., 1882, 
aged over 108 years. A good old age truly, though not so great 
as made out by Harper’s Weekly. 

An early settler in Virginia was named Thomas Griffin. He 
was the great grandfather of Judge Cyrus Griffin, who was the 
last president of the so-called Continental Congress. 

So many interesting stories are told of the Griffins in old 
documents that a large volume, nay, many volumes would be 
required to contain them, but the present undertaking is prin- 
cipally to give some account of the descendants of one settler 
on Long Island, New York; in fact, it is confined almost entirely 
to one branch of his family. 



COAT-OF'ARMS 



The coat-of-arms shown in the illustration is the same, or 
nearly the same, as the arms of Griffin of Penrith in Wales, as 
shown in “Edmonstone’s Heraldry” — edition 1780. It is copied 
from an address card of George Griffin, of New York, a descend- 
ant of Jasper Griffin, of Southold, Long Island. This George 
Griffin was a noted lawyer, also author of theological works 
which commanded much attention in their day, but which are 
very heavy reading for most people in the present age. His 
brother, Rev. Edward Dorr Griffin, D. D., was for many years 
President of Williams College. The children of both these men 
also made use of the arms on their cards. 




That there was some foundation for their claim is evidenced 
by the following quotation from “Griffin’s Journal”: “The few 
natives remaining in these parts became much attached to Jasper 
Griffin, and often showed it in their natural but honest mode. 



10 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



One, an ingenious, true friend of Jasper, wrought out a wood 
porringer and presented it to his friend the white man. Jasper 
took it with pleasure and soon after sent the curiosity to his 
friends in Europe. In due time it was sent back with a plate of 
silver neatly lining the handle; on this was engraved the Griffin 
Coat-of-Arms. This relic is now (1857) in the hands of one of 
the descendants of the fifth or sixth generation. ’ ’ Augustus 
Griffin, the author of the ‘‘Journal,” was in his ninety-first year 
when he published the book, and survived nine years after. He 
died in March, 1866, in his hundredth year. 

Some of the descendants of Edward Griffin, of Flushing, 
have convinced themselves that he also was of the family which 
bore those arms, and have made use of them. Whether that is a 
fact or not is of little consequence now, and the arms are shown 
here as an interesting relic. Judging by such records as we have, 
our ancestors, with or without heraldic insignia, were good and 
brave men and noble women, doing their duty as they saw it. Is 
not that enough ? As an English poet says : 

“Honor and fame from no condition rise, 

Act well thy part, there all the honor lies.” 

And an American poet, J. R. Lowell, thus expresses the same 
thought : 

“The wisest man could ask no more of fate, 

Than to be simple, modest, manly, true, 

Safe from the many, honored by the few; 

Nothing to court in church or world or state, 

But inwardly, in secret, to be great.” 



CHARACTERISTICS 



The selection of the contents of the following pages 
from the mass of material accumulated has directed atten- 
tion to some of the characteristics of the family here described. 
Though this family may not have produced great celebrities, its 
members have been characterized generally as God fearing, hard 
working, clean living, useful men and women in their day and 
generation. Many of them were Quakers and nearly all of peace 
loving disposition and character; nevertheless, every generation 
has found some ready and willing to fight the enemies of their 
country, whether foreign or domestic. In the great war just 
ended a number of them served in the Canadian army, some were 
wounded and some lost their lives. 

It is noticeable, also, that large families have been common in 
the clan, and that comparatively few of the children died young. 
A large percentage of these people attained old age, while octo- 
genarians and nonogenarians have been numerous among them. 
These facts appear the more remarkable when it is remembered 
that doctors were few, trained nurses and hospitals were un- 
known, medical science and sanitation were crude. Evidently 
modern inventions and luxuries are not indispensable to longev- 
ity. Truly ‘ ‘ Life consisteth not in the abundance of things which 
a man hath. ’ ’ 

An ancient writer said : ‘ ‘ Children are an heritage from the 
Lord. * * * # Happy is the man that hath his quiver full of 
them.” Judged by this standard what a happy people were those 
whose history we here study. 

In these pages much is told of the work, the hardships and 
the achievements of the men, because the legal documents mostly 
carry only the names of men, and their actions were more under 
the observation of those who were recording events. The women 



12 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



did not often appear in public affairs and little has been said 
of their part in the development of the country and of their 
patriotism. Nevertheless, they were as industrious, as religious, 
as patriotic and probably more self-sacrificing than their hus- 
bands, their fathers and their brothers. To them is due much of 
the education and patriotic training the young people have en- 
joyed. When the writer went out with his company for service 
on the frontier, in 1865, his mother said: “ Whatever you do, 
never turn your back to the enemy,” and similar remarks have 
been common when the young men have gone to defend their 
country. 

It is now a legal fiction that all unmarried women are 
spinsters. But two generations ago nearly every woman in Can- 
ada could spin, and the girls were not considered eligible for 
marriage until they could spin their “forty knots” in a day. 
They were also expected to knit, to make all kinds of wearing 
apparel, and some of them could weave also. They were adepts 
in the culinery art ; there being few, if any, bakers in the country 
in those days, all the bread, as well as the cakes, pies and pud- 
dings were baked by the same busy hands, and that without the 
many labor-saving contrivances which adorn the modern kitchen. 
Those industrious ladies filled their larders with jellies, preserves, 
pickles and many other dainties. Nor did they neglect to store 
more substantial items of daily food. They cured, by different 
methods, the meats for winter use ; barrels of pork in brine, 
sugar-cured hams, dried and smoked beef were among the stores 
of this kind. 

Milking, butter-making and candle-making were also part of 
the work of these indefatigable workers. Gas and electric lights 
were unknown, coal had not yet made its appearance, so our 
mothers and grandmothers were the manufacturers of the tallow 
candles which provided “the light of other days” by which we 
studied our lessons and read the few story books which came 
our way. 




CYNTHIA ANN (WILLIAMS) GRIFFIN 
(See No. 250) 



A PIONEEE FAMILY 



13 



If the men endured hardships, overcame difficulties and 
dangers as pioneers in developing the resources of the new land, 
what shall be said of their mothers, their wives and their daught- 
ers? Truly in many cases their privations, hardships and dif- 
ficulties were the greater. All honor to them that they so cheer- 
fully endured and played their part. They had their “careers,” 
to use a phrase common among a certain class of our young 
people to-day. They did not have an idle public applauding 
them, but they were worthy of the praise given to such as they in 
the thirty-first chapter of the book of Proverbs, from which I 
quote : 

‘ ‘ She layeth her hand to the spindle, and her hands hold the 
distaff. She stretcheth out her hand to the poor ; yea, she reach- 
eth forth her hand to the needy. * * * * Her children rise 

up and call her blessed, her husband also, and he praiseth her.” 

Many of these women were not only adepts in domestic 
science and the other accomplishments of notable housekeepers, 
but had also a good literary education. The children were greatly 
indebted to their mothers for what education they received. 
Books were scarce, it is true, but they were mostly good and 
were assiduously studied. There are extant to-day many letters, 
diaries and other products of the pens of the pioneers, such as 
acrostics, essays and short poems of merit. The neat, plain 
chirography and choice, sometimes elegant, English of these 
writings would put to shame the productions of many graduates 
of our present day Collegiate Institutes. 

These women added to their many other virtues that of hos- 
pitality. They were ever ready to welcome the traveller and 
the stranger and entertain to the best of their ability. Especially 
helpful were they to the immigrants who followed them. 



MIGRATION TO AMERICA 



The accomplishment of difficult undertakings, the surmount- 
ing of great obstacles and the endurance of hardship is the de- 
light of numbers of the human race. Even those who have not 
the courage nor the will for such exploits love to hear or read of 
the deeds of those more courageous or more enterprising than 
themselves. 

It is true the mists of time and distance lend an air of 
romance to things which appeared matter-of-fact and common- 
place in their time and locality. But the settlement of America 
by the white race in the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries was full of adventure and exploits which must have 
excited the admiration and awakened the ambition of the con- 
temporary hearers of those deeds. 

In that time of strenuous effort and wild adventure com- 
mences the American history of the family of which I propose 
to give a brief account. There have been /comparatively few 
records preserved by the family and my information is drawn 
principally from official documents, etc., preserved in town, 
county and state archives, or gathered by libraries and historical 
societies. I have copies of many of them, but will only summar- 
ize the facts contained in them and give some interesting quota- 
tions. 

On the 24th of October, 1635, there sailed from London, Eng- 
land, two ships, viz., 'The “Constance,” Clement Champion, 
Master, and The “Abraham,” John Barker, Master, bpund for 
Virginia. These ships carried 1312 young men and four women, 
all in the service of Captain William Clayborne and his partners, 
William Clobery and David Moorehead, merchants, of London. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



15 



This company of merchants had secured from King Charles 
such privileges as European monarchs then assumed to give their 
friends. The territory assigned to these men is now included in 
the iStates of Virginia and Maryland. Lord Baltimore laid claim 
to a part of the same land. These disputed claims led to con- 
flicts somewhat similar to those between the Hudson Bay Com- 
pany and the Northwest Fur Company more than 150 years later. 

Among the passengers on the ship “Abraham” were a num- 
ber of Welshmen, and one of these was Edward Griffith, or 
Griffin, and on the “Constance” was John Griffin. There are 
reason for supposing them to have been brothers. 

Settlement was made on what they called Kent Island, which 
is on the easterly shore of Chesapeake Bay, and Palmer’s Island 
(now Watson’s Island) at the mouth of the Susquehanna River. 
Their trading posts were probably similar to those of the Hud- 
son’s Bay Co., in the northwest, built of logs with a palisade en- 
closing their grounds. 

In the party located on Palmer’s Island was Edward Griffin, 
and here they carried on trad'e with the Indians and prepared 
staves from the timber for shipment to Ehgland. Here they 
were located for nearly three years, and here probably Edward 
acquired the knowledge of the Indian language, which enabled 
him in later years to act as interpreter. 

On the 30th of June, 1(038, the armed emissaries of Lord 
Baltimore attacked this post, killed three of the defenders, cap- 
tured Edward Griffin and three others, whom they took to Mary- 
land, where they were detained for some time. Lord Baltimore 
was severely censured by King Charles for his violent acts against 
these people. 

Extract from letter of King Charles I. to Lord Baltimore, 
dated July 14, 1638. After reminding Baltimore that in former 
letters he signified his good will toward Clobery and his partners 



16 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



and that they should be encouraged in their good work, he says : 

4 4 We do now understand that though your agents there had notice 
of our said Pleasure signified by our said Letters, yet contrary 
thereto they have slain three of our subjects there land by force 
possessed themselves !by might of that Island and seized and 
carried away both the persons and Estate of said Planters,” etc., 
etc. 

Edward Griffin escaped 1 to the Dutch colony at 'New Amster- 
dam, where he was brought before the authorities, August 27, 
1640, on the application of Leonard Calvert, Governor of Mary- 
land, to have him returned there. But proving himself to have 
been a prisoner there he was released and remained at New 
Amsterdam. 

Feb. 28, 16153, Edward Griffin acquired, from Gerritt Bycken, 
at Flat'bush, L. I., land which he sold July 27, 16513. In 1656 he re- 
sided and had land at Gravesend, L. I., in the colony of Lady De- 
borah Moody. During ensuing years there are many records of 
his purchases and sales of land. He finally located at Flushing, 
where he was one of the earliest settlers. With other inhabitants 
of Flushing, on Dec. 27, 1667, he protested against the persecution 
of the Quakers, to Governor Petrus ( Stuyvesant. Sept. 23, 1661, 
he acted as interpreter between John Richbell and the Indians 
for the purchase of land at Mamaroneck, Westchester County. 
Aug. 12, 1067, with other residents of Flushing, he offered his 
services to the King. Dec. 14, 1678, he sailed on ship “Blossom” 
for England, but returned subsequently. April 9. 1080, he was 
an “overseer” at Flushing. In the estimates of Flushing in 1083, 
he had “ 20 acres of uplands, 10 acres of meadow, 1 horse, 2 1 oxen, 

5 cowes, 3 swine and 18 sheep” ; his sons are also credited with 
land and live stock. In 1086 he made application to Governor 
Thomas Dougan for common lands at Flushing for his son John 
Griffin. In the census of August, 1698, Edward Griffin, sr., wife 
Mary and daughter Deborah are mentioned in the enumeration 
of families of Flushing as were also Edward, jr., John and Rich- 
ard, with their wives and children. 




ARTHUR KENT GRIFFIN, M. A. 

In Overseas Service. 

(See No. 616) 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



17 



In a list of eighty-seven men, officers, non-commissioned 
officers and privates, enrolled in Flushing under an order by 
Robert Hunter, Governor of New York, the order being dated 
Aug. 19, 1715, the names of the following members of the Griffin 
family appear: 

John Griffin. 

Jacob Griffin. 

Richard Griffin. 

Samuel Griffin. 

The wills of various members of the family now held in the 
archives of historical societies of the county and of the state 
furnish much of the information here utilized. They furnish 
evidence that many of these people were of high standing in the 
community and that some were wealthy, judging by their be- 
quests, as for instance the bequest made by Jonathan Griffin of 
£100 to Presbyterian Church at Scarsdale in the very age when 
Oliver Goldsmith wrote of a village clergyman: 

“A man he was to all the country dear, 

And passing rich on forty pounds a year. ” 

A most interesting description of the discovery and settle- 
ment of Long Island is contained in “Early Long Island,” by 
Martha Bockee Flint, who quotes extensively from original 
documents and old contemporary accounts, giving descriptions 
of the various townships and villages, with their religious, racial 
and political characteristics. Having brought down the history 
to the period just preceding the War of the Revolution, before 
discussing that stormy time the authoress summarizes the char- 
acteristics and manners of the inhabitants in chapter XIV. From 
this summary I quote the following testimonial to the worth of 
the people among whom the Griffin family were honored neigh- 
bors in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries : 

“Favoured in natural advantages, it was still the sterling 
worth of her people which determined the character of Long 



2 



18 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



Island. It is a noteworthy fact that among her first planters 
was not a Redemptioner, nor one of the criminal class which 
swelled the population of other colonies. Long Island was 
settled by the best yeomanry of England, among whom were 
found professional men and not a few of gentle blood and fair 
estate. There were other conditions in a high degree conducive 
to the well-being of Long Island. It was spared the blight of 
theological controversy. In the years when the Connecticut 
Valley was writhing under the fiery eloquence of Jonathan Ed- 
wards and Whitfield preached on Boston Common to fifteen 
thousand weeping hearers, the Dutch Domines of Nassau went 
calmly through their accustomed ritual; the once persecuted 
Quakers, in their plain houses, quietly awaited the movement of 
the Spirit; the Liturgy of the Church of England was heard at 
Saint George’s and at Caroline Church. Independent ministers 
held their meetings unmolested. * * * * This mild toler- 

ance, which, except for brief persecution of the Quakers, had 
always characterized Long Island, was a direct heritage from 
Holland, and not the least of good New York owes to her earliest 
settlers. Their influence is more vital and more seminal than is 
often recognised. * * * * Long Island, increasing rapidly 

in population and wealth, her thrifty planters soon found them- 
selves more ‘straitened’ than had been the Linne men. The 
middle of the eighteenth century was the swarming time, and 
from the mother-hive were sent out in groups, or in single 
families, those who in subsequent migration have carried the 
names and blood of Long Island from the Hudson to the Rio 
Grande and the Yukon. It is doubtful if there has been in Amer- 
ica any greater centre of dispersion, certainly none to which can 
be more directly traced the best elements of our American char- 
acter.” 

The Griffins were among the earliest of these swarming 
families, the third generation, early in the eighteenth century, 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



19 



became pioneers in Westchester and Duchess Counties of New 
York, and in the southern part of Connecticut. 

The date of Edward Griffin’s marriage we have not found, 
nor the family name of his wife, but it is recorded that her Chris- 
tian name was Mary. From various documents we learn the 
names of four children, whether or not there were more we have 
not learned. 



2nd GENERATION 

The children of Edward and Mary Griffin were : 

2 — Edward, date of birth not known, m. Deborah Barnes. 

3 — John, m. Elizabeth 

4 — Richard, m. Susanna Haight. 

5 — Deborah. 



20 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



3rd GENERATION 

2 

Edward' Griffin, (2) married Jan. 4, 1678, Deborah Barnes. 
CHILDREN: 

6 — Edward, no particulars known. 

7 — Mary, date of birth not known, married a Disbrow. 

g , m. Elisha Barton. 

3 

John Griffin (2), son of Edward (1) and Mary, of Flushing, 

Long Island, N. Y., married Elizabeth Will dated April 9, 

1740. He died Jan. 30, 1742. 

CHILDREN: 

9 — John, b. previous to 1698, d. 1759, at Mamaroneck. 

10 — Benjamin, b. previous to 1698, m. Mary Disbrow, 
daughter of Henry Disbrow. 

11 — Isaac, b. previous to 1698. 

12 — Joseph, b. previous to 1698. 

13 — Elizabeth, b. previous to 1698, m. a Gale. 

14 — Mary. 

15— Caleb. 

16 — Jacob, b. about 1703; d. 1784. 

17 — Adam, had land at Rye in 1727. 

18 — Ezekiel, m. Ann , (will dated Dec. 10, 1769 ; d. 1782). 

19— William, d. 1798. 

There is reason to believe that several of the descendants of 
the above settled in Nova Scotia, and possibly some in Upper 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



21 



Canada (now Ontario). In the possession of the compiler are the 
names of 2(60 known de&cendents of John Griffin (-2), but the 
scope of this compilation is confined more particularly to another 
branch of the family, and selection is made accordingly. How- 
ever, it may be worth while to mention that one Caleb Griffin, 
from New York colony, settled in Nova Scotia, and a descendant 
of his named Joseph came to Ontario nearly one hundred years 
ago. Descendants of this, branch reside in the cities of London 
and St. Thomas and in the counties of Halton, Wellington and 
Wentworth. There was a Caleb among the grandsons of John 
Griffin, but no record is preserved as to what became of him, 
nor of his uncle above mentioned; one of them may have been 
progenitor of this Canadian family. 

3 

Richard Griffin (2), son of Edward (1), married Susanna 
Haight, daughter of Nicholas Haight, of Flushing, L. I. A 
descendant of one of her brothers was a loyalist and settled east 
of Toronto ; there are descendents now living in Toronto. Rich- 
ard appears to have spent his life at Flushing, L. I., and accum- 
ulated considerable property, as well as a family of fourteen 
children. He died in 1722 or 1723. In his will, which is dated 
(Oct. 27, 1722!, and was probated Feb. 5, 1723, he mentions his 
wife Susanna and thirteen children, but as he does not name 
Richard, his third child, it is supposed that he had died. With 
the exception of two bequests, viz., First to “eldest son Samuel 
thirty pounds to be paid him next third month” (March), and to 
“son Joshua twenty pounds when he comes out of his apprentice- 
ship,” he bequeaths: “To my dear and loving wife Susanna all 
my lands, housings, orchards and meadows with all the rest of 
my estate, real and personal, whatsoever, wholly to dispose of and 
Mse ias she shall think best for the bringing up of my children” 

“and if she die my widow she shall have full power 

to distribute whatever of my estate may be remaining, but if she 



22 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



chance to marry again then she shall have one-third of all when 
the land and housing is sold and all in a condition to be divided.” 
Then follow directions for the dividing of the remaining two- 
thirds. 

CHILDREN: 

20 — Samuel, b. previous to 1698, m. Elizabeth Hopper, of 
Flushing. 

21 — Sarah, b. previous to 1698. 

22 — Richard, b. previous to 1698, d. before 1722. 

23 — Mary. 

24 — Deborah. 

25 — Joshua, an apprentice in 1772, settled in Duchess Co., 
1740. His descendents had mills at Fishkill, N. Y. 

26 — Jonathan, b. May 31, 1708, d. April 26, 1786, at Scarsdale. 

27— Edward, b. in 1710. d. 1787 or 1788. 

28 — Obadiah, d. at Nine Partners, Duchess Co., 1785. 

29 — James, was an officer in British army and commanded 
a garrison in Pennsylvania ; d. in Boston ; had no children. 

30 — Gilbert. 

31 — Joseph, died at Nine Partners, N. Y., at advanced age. 

32 — Isaiah. 

33 — Miriam. 

Nearly all this family, like their father and grandfather, were 
members of the (Society of Friends, or Quakers. They became 
pioneers in the then newly settled parts of New York. Of Samuel 
little is known ; his eldest son is mentioned in the will of Jonathan ; 
nothing further has been learned of him. Jonathan settled in 
White Plains and Scarsdale, became wealthy, was a captain and 
a Presbyterian elder, as we learn from his tombstone, still re- 
maining in the churchyard at (Scarsdale. He had no children. By 
his will he left £100 to the Presbyterian Church at White Plains, 
and made bequests to a number of his nephews. 

The other sons of Richard (2) all settled in Duchess Co., four 
of them at Nine Partners (now called Washington Precinct). 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



23 



A (manuscript geneology of the descendants of Joshua is in 
possession of the writer, and he regrets that the scope of this 
paper prevents the use of it and the geneologies of several other 
branches of the family in his possession. Descendants of Isaiah, 
and perhaps of Obadiah and Gilbert, emigrated to Canada during 
and after the revolutionary war, some locating in Eastern Ontario 
and others in Nova Scotia. One named Samuel was a pioneer 
near Brockville. As Western New York was opened to settle- 
ment, children and grandchildren of these Duchess County 
Griffins migrated there. Obadiah and Robert Griffin, the found- 
ers of the town of Griffin’s Mills, near Buffalo, were of this con- 
nection. 



24 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



4th GENERATION 

The fourth generation lived in strenuous and exciting times. 
The war of the American revolution was fought during that 
period, and though they had no direct part in it, the French 
revolution influenced and seriously affected even America. In 
fact, it is probable that it was in a large measure the cause of the 
war of 1812-14 on this continent. 

The authoress of “Early Long Island” — already quoted — 
devotes most of her Chapter XV. to what she calls “Protests 
against Rebellion,” and therein bears eloquent testimony to the 
self-sacrificing devotion of the Loyalists to what proved to be 
the losing side. She proves by the testimony of their enemies 
that they were a much maligned class. While evidently in sym- 
pathy with the Independence cause, she bears witness to the 
honesty and uprightness of the majority of the Loyalists. She 
says in one place : ‘ ‘ While every Loyalist was true to the bitter 
end, giving his all to the inexorable sense of duty, which made 
him such, there were unquestionably many selfish men among 
those who arrogated to themselves the names of ‘Patriot/ ” She 
also quotes from another this statement regarding New York : 
“It is probable that more than half her people were never really 
in hearty, active sympathy with the patriots ;” and from Theodore 
Roosevelt’s “Life of Governor Morris,” p. 29, is quoted: 

“The Loyalists of ’76 had greater reason for believing 
themselves right than the men who tried to break up the Union 
three-quarters of a century later. It is unfair to brand the 
‘tory’ of ’76 with a shame no longer felt to pertain to the 
‘rebel’ of 1860.” These are only a few of the many things said 
in favor of the United Empire Loyalists by Miss Flint. 

Several American authors have written books presenting 
the Loyalists in a favorable light; but a book every Canadian 




MORREL GRIFFIN 

(See No. 89) 




A PIONEER FAMILY 



25 



should read is the two volume “Loyalists of America,” by Rev. 
Egerton Ryerson, D.D., formerly Superintendent of Education in 
the Province of Ontario. 

27 

Edward Griffin ('3), son of Richard and Susanna (Haight) 
Griffin, married Millicent Bishop. After living near his brother 
Jonathan, White Plains, N. Y., for a time, he migrated northward 
and settled at Nine Partners, Duchess Co., where he raised his 
family ; was a prominent member of the Society of Friends in that 
place and died there in 1787. 

CHILDREN: 

34 — Richard, b. June 22, 1732; d. in 1794. 

35 — Bridget, b. March 24, 1734. 

36 — Susanna, b. July 24, 1736. 

37 — Isaiah, b. July 30, 1738. 

38 — Thomas, b. Feb. 6, 1741. 

39 — Obadiah, b. March 9, 1743. 

40 — Amy, b March 24, 1746. 

41— Sarah, b. Jan. 30, 1748. 

42— Miriam, b. May 3, 1749. 

43 — Elizabeth, b. Dec. 25, 1752. 

44 — Gershom, b. April 1, 1755. 

45 — Jonathan, b. May 11, 1759. 

In the war of the American revolution three of the seven 
sons of Edward (3) were loyalists, viz., Richard, Thomas and 
Obadiah. The latter two took an active part in the British ser- 
vice, and two of the sons of Richard are said to have served in 
loyal colonial regiments. The remainder of Edward’s family ap- 
parently were non-partisan, being Quakers. Thomas, a lieutenant 
in a loyal colonial regiment, was captured with a number of other 
loyalists, among them his brother Obadiah and a cousin named 



26 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



Joseph Griffin. They were imprisoned in Albany jail. Thomas 
was tried by the so-called 1 Committee of Safety and sentenced to 
be hanged for the crime of having accepted a commission in the 
British service. His was not a solitary case of that kind, other 
instances being recorded* and probably many unrecorded. When 
the jailer announced to him that he was to be hanged next day 
he said, “The man who will hang me is not born;” with his 
handcuffs he knocked down the jailer, took his keys and liberated 
himself and his fellow loyalists. Joseph Griffin escaped to Can- 
ada and years later gave evidence at the sittings of the court ap- 
pointed to adjust loyalist claims. Thomas and Obadiah made 
their way to Nova 'Scotia. They received grants of farm land, 
also lots in the new city of St. John. Thus they became pioneers 
in another new province, that part of Nova Scotia becoming the 
Province of New Brunswick. Thomas married there and had 
thirteen children, of whom little is known, though a grandson 
named Thomas H. Griffin was President of an Electric Light Co. 
in the city of Amherst, Nova Scotia, in 1891. 

About 1814 Obadiah migrated with his family to Upper Can- 
ada and remained a year with his relatives at Smithville. Of Oba- 
diah ? s family we have record of only one son, Obadiiah; he had 
ten children, of whom one, Jacob, was born at Smithville, Lin- 
coln Co., Nov. 5, 1815. He became a Baptist preacher, and his 
eldest son, Rev. Zebina Flavius Griffin, b. Nov. 14, 1844, spent 
many years as a missionary in India. On his return, in 1893, he 
wrote a book entitled “Daily Life in Bengal,” which is very in- 
teresting and marvellously concise. It was highly commended 
by the press for its accuracy and inclusiveness. 

*See preface to Schoolcraft's “Personal Memoirs of Thirty Years' 
Residence with the Indian Tribes," for account of such a case. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



27 



5th GENERATION 

34 

Richard Griffin (4), eldest son of Edward (3), born June 22, 
1732, was a school teacher, farmer and miller. He married 
Mary Smith, daughter of Judge Abraham Smith, New York. 
They had twelve children, seven sons and five daughters, all of 
whom, except the eldest daughter, came to Canada in 1786. Early 
in that year Richard and his second son, Edward, then 22 years 
of age, came over and selected as their future home the site of 
the present village of Smithville, South Grimsby, Lincoln Co., 
where the family was allotted 800 acres of land. The father 
then returned to Duchess County for the rest of the family, leav- 
ing Edward alone in the vast wilderness, which he lived to see be- 
come a well populated and prosperous settlement. The arrange- 
ments for moving and the wearisome journey through a wild 
country occupied six months. Part of the family came by barges 
up lake Ontario from Rochester to Niagara, bringing their mill 
machinery, and the others followed the Indian trail, bringing their 
live stock through the forest, western New York not being then 
settled. Rochester consisted of little more than a blacksmith 
shop and a tavern. The settlement of this family in South 
Grimsby became known as the Griffin Settlement, and is some- 
times yet called Griffinville, though they themselves called it 
Smithville, in honor of their mother. Great was the rejoicing of 
Edward on the arrival of his relatives, for a lonely time had been 
his lot, though he had kept himself busy building ia log house and 
manufacturing rude furniture to make it as civilized as possible. 
Richard lived long enough to see his family well established in 
this pioneer home and several of them married. He died in 1794, 
aged 62 years. Most of his children lived to very advanced age. 
Edward, the pioneer of pioneers, died Aug. 13, 1862, aged 98 
years, as his tombstone in the Methodist churchyard states. 



28 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



Records of the difficulties and hardships of the journey from 
Duchess County, New York, to South Grimsby, Canada, are not 
available; but the “Brief History of the Wardell Family/’ who 
came from New Jersey about the same time, has an account of 
some of the experiences of that family. Doubtless the Griffin 
family encountered similar problems. A few short extracts will 
give some idea of the magnitude of their task: “They cut their 
way through dense underbrush and camped at night beside some 
stream. The men took turns watching till daylight to guard 
the little party from wild animals and prowling Indians. How 
trying such a journey under these circumstances would be, and 
how difficult to sleep with wolves howling, bears growling, wild 
cats and lynx screaming, and with the ever present fear of an 
attack from ferocious savages, and with no protection but the 

flimsy walls of a canvas wagon!” “Words fail to 

express the joy they felt when at last they put foot on British 
soil once more.” Resuming their journey after a short stay at 
Niagara they travelled along the lake shore, but had to make 
many detours around the inlets, or “ponds” as the account calls 
them, and made very slow progress. We will not follow the de- 
tails as given in the history, but make further quotations of ex- 
periences which were probably common to other migrants in the 
County of Lincoln at that time: “Every step of the journey was 

at the expense of most arduous toil They considered 

themselves fortunate indeed if they succeeded in advancing at 

the rate of three or four miles per day They built 

bridges over streams too deep to ford, filled in mud holes, and 
made long, toilsome detours on account of streams too wide to 
bridge. Altogether they surmounted obstacles which would have 
daunted and made turn back a less determined party.” 

But the experiences of these pioneer parties were “light 
afflictions” when compared with what was endured by some of 
the loyalists who came a few years earlier, without horses and 
wagons, without cattle, with little food, driven from their homes 
by “the patriots” and living on roots and berries, and even eat- 




SMITH GRIFFIN 



(See No. 53) 



Reproduction from an oil painting. 

Some of his grandsons said it was not a good likeness. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



29 



ing their dogs. These were some of the experiences of the 
Showers family and many others. 

The Griffin family having established themselves in South 
Grimsby, proceeded to improve their circumstances and make 
the most of their opportunities. Being God-fearing people they 
were interested in the religious well-being of the country, and an 
essay written in 1878 by Mr. Abishai Moore tells of their efforts. 
The following extract from the essay summarizes the facts : “In or 
about 1792 a Methodist class was organized in Smith ville, or, 
as it was then called, Griffin Settlement. There was a large 
family of these Griffins, and they appear to have had consider- 
able influence in the community in those days. They all became 
members of the class, and proceeded, as was the custom among 
those early Methodists, to go out into the highways and seek those 
to whom they could tell the glad tidings. In a short time the 
little class at Griffin Settlement became an important institution 
in the locality, and many of the leading families of the district 
became connected with it, among them being the Merritts, 
Johnsons and Wrongs. 

CHILDREN: 

46 — Amelia, b. 1758, m. Richard Sloter. 

47— Abraham, b. April 16, 1760; d. May 14, 1818. 

48— Bethiah, b. 1762. 

49— Edward, b. 1764; d. Aug. 13, 1862. 

50 — Nathaniel, b. 1766. 

51— Miriam, b. 1768; m. a Meredith. 

52— Isaiah, b. April 24, 1771 ; d. April 12, 1865. 

53 — Smith, b. Aug. 9, 1772; d. Sept. 28, 1849. 

54 — Jonathan, b. 1774; d. 1814, while in military service. 

55 — Elizabeth, b. 1776 ; m. a Lindebury. 

56— Mary, b. 1778; d. in 1873. 

57 — Richard, b. 1780; d. in 1807. 



30 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



6th GENERATION 

47 

Abraham Griffin ('5), son of Richard and Mary (Smith) 
Griffin, was born at Nine Partners, Dnchess Co., N. Y., April 16, 
1700. He came to 'Canada in 1786, with his parents and other 
members of the family. It is believed that he served in a loyal 
colonial regiment during the revolutionary war. He married Miss 
Mary Roy, Jan. 9, 1794 ; she was born Feb. 27, 1772. They set- 
tled in Grimsby township. Abraham served in the militia during 
the war of 1812-14. He died May 14, 1818. 

CHILDREN: 

58 — Abraham, b. May 26, 1798 ; d. Oct. 29, 1842. 

59 — Edward, b. Jan. 12, 1801. 

60 — Jemima, b. March 9, 1803; d. May 30, 1827. 

61 — Stephen, b. Feb. 4, 1806. 

62 — Mary, b. Feb. 19, 1808 ; m. Isaac Dennis ; was living at 
Campden, Ont., in 1890. 

63 — Richard, b. Nov. 22, 1809. 

64 — Catherine, b. Aug. 10, 1812. 

65 — Roy, b. Aug. 23, 1815; d. in 1890; never married. 



48 

Bethiah Griffin (5), second daughter of Richard and Mary 
(Smith) Griffin, was born in 1762. She married (first) Solomon 
Hill, born Aug. 30, 1756, a son of Capt. Hill. Solomon Hill was 
elected a member of the Provincial Parliament in 1804. He died 
August 30th, 1807. 

CHILDREN: 

66 — Richard, b. Jan. 11, 1784. 

67— William, b. Oct. 31, 1784. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



31 



68 — Abraham, b. Feb. 2, 1787. 

69 — Jane, b. March 28, 1790. 

70— Mary, b. Sept. 22, 1791. 

71 — Solomon — b. Sept. 4, 1793. 

72 — Jonathan, b. July 1, 1795. 

73 — Bethiah, b. Jan. 19, 1798. 

74 — Smith, b. Sept. 13, 1799 ; d. in infancy. 

75 — Cornelius, b. Jan. 22, 1801. 

76 — Smith (2nd), b. Aug. 31, 1806. 

77 — Nathaniel, b. May 5, 1812, m. Eleanor Field. 

Bethiah (Griffin) Hill married (second) Dr. Myers (or 
Myree), a physician. 

49 

Edward Griffin (5), second son of Richard and Mary (Smith) 
Griffin, born at Nine Partners, Duchess Co., N. Y., in 1764, and 
died at Smithville, Ont., Aug. 13, 1862. He married (first) 
Debbie Wardell. He was a very religious man, a Methodist, 
liberal both to the poor and to the church; very even tempered 
and of a kindly disposition; was a Lieutenant in the Lincoln 
regiment of militia and served with that corps in the war of 1812. 
A short time before his death he was visited by Rev. W. S. 
Griffin, his grand-nephew, who found him sitting on his verandah 
and asked after his health; his reply was, “Not an ache nor a 
pain, just waiting for the Lord.” 

CHILDREN : 



78 — Joseph. 

79 — Smith, b. in 1800, settled in Township of Erin. 

80 — Isaac, m. Miss Disher. 

81 — William, a physician, died in 1837 or 1838, his death re- 
sulting from injuries caused by being thrown from a horse. 

82 — Daniel, a mason by trade, Methodist in religion. 



32 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



83 — Edward. 

84 — Richard, died young. 

85 — Catherine, m. Thos. Wingrove. 



Edward (5), married (second) Mary Lounsbury, who 
died Sept. 10, 1868. 

CHILDREN: 

86 — Jacob, b. 1816, d. Sept. 3, 1861. 

87 — Parmela, m. Dr. Abraham Kelley 

88 — Jonathan Wesley, b. Aug. 8, 1821; d. March 11, 1888. 

89— Morrel, b. April 4, 1823 ; d. April 2, 1901. 

50 

Nathaniel Griffin (5), third son of Richard and Mary (Smith) 
Griffin, b. 1766; married Elizabeth Beam. He served in the 4th 
Lincoln Militia regiment in war of 1812. 

CHILDREN: 

90 — Jacob. 

91 — Richard. 

92 — Nathaniel. 

93 — Mary, m. Rev. William Ryerson, son of Colonel Ryerson. 
and brother of Rev. Egerton Ryerson, D.D. 

94 — Christina, m. Dr. Pettit. 

95 — John. 

Miriam Griffin (5), third daughter of Richard and Mary 
(Smith) Griffin, wsa born in 1768; m. Abraham Meredith. 

CHILDREN: 

96 — John. 

97 — Richard. 

98 — Mary, m. John Smith. 

99 — Annie, m. William Headley. 




MRS. MARY (HILL) WADDELL 



(See No. 70) 




JUSTUS A. GRIFFIN 
In Fort Garry, Man., 1871-72 
(See No. 479) 





A PIONEER FAMILY 



100— William. 

101 — Elizabeth, m. Mr. Durkee. 



33 



52 

Isaiah Griffin (5), fourth son of Richard and Mary (Smith) 
Griffin, was born April 24, 1771, and died at Waterdown, Ont., 
April 12, 1865. He married Susannah Culp, who was born 
at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in 1777, and died in Waterdown, Ont., 
July 29, 1065. !He took an active part in the war of 1812, serving 
in 4th Lincoln regiment. His home was in Smithville, Ont., where 
tall his children were born. After the war he removed to Nelson 
township, Halton County, near Hannahville. Isaiah and Susannah 
Griffin had eleven children. 

CHILDREN: 

102 — Mary, b. March 19, 1795. 

103 — David, b. May 7, 1797 ; d. at Vienna, Ont., Dec. 6, 1886. 

104 — Nathaniel, b. June 26, 1799; d. Dec. 13, 1853. 

105 — Fanny, b. 1801. 

106— Isaac, b. June 19, 1803 ; d. Dec. 24, 1887. 

107 — Solomon, b. June 30, 1805; d. Aug. 30, 1896. 

108 — Susannah, b. in 1807. 

109 — Sarah, b. in 1809. 

110 — Robert Allen, b. Aug. 5, 1811. 

111 — Smith Culp, b. May 25, 1814; d. 1894. 

112— William Henry, b. Feb. 17, 1817 ; d. May 11, 1887. 

53 

Smith Griffin (5), fifth son of Richard and Mary (Smith) 
Griffin, was born Aug, 9, 1772, at Nine Partners, N. Y. ; came to 
Canada with his father in 1787, and died in Brantford township, 
Ont., Sept. 28, 1849. He related that when coming through New 



3 



34 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



York State to Canada they crossed the Genessee River by ferry 
at Rochester, then scarcely a village. There they embarked the 
women and children in boats, with enough men to care for them, 
floated down the river to Lake Ontario and coasted along to 
-Niagara. The rest of the men followed the trail through the 
woods with the horses and cattle. Smith Griffin made his home 
in Smithville, Ont., during the active years of his life. He be- 
came in a sense the leader of the clan, took the management of 
the milling business, built and operated a carding .mill, an ashery 
and a general store, built a road to “the Twenty,” as Jordan vil- 
lage was formerly called, and whence he exported the produce of 
the mills, etc. In the course of years he established several 
branch establishments at Hamilton, Grimsby, Port Burwell and 
other places. He was captain in the 4th Lincoln regiment and 
fought in the hotly contested battle of Lundy’s Lane, as well as 
in many other engagements. At one time the General in command 
gave him a special furlough to enable him to go to Montreal and 
secure goods which were much needed in the country. One of 
his sons, the Hon. Henry Griffin, of Grand Haven, Mich., said 
to the writer : “I remember seeing a company of American soldiers 
sleeping on the floor of my father’s kitchen one week and next 
week it was occupied by a company of 'Canadian militia. Some- 
times our meadows were filled with herds of cattle gathered to 
supply food for the soldiers.” After the war he settled down 
again to peaceful pursuits, extending his already large business. 

Smith Griffin was a devoted Methodist, and though he never 
entered the itineracy he was a regularly ordained minister of the 
Methodist Church, preaching on Sunday and carrying on busi- 
ness through the balance of the week. One account, in the gene- 
ology of the Douglas family, calls him Captain and Reverend 
Smith Griffin. After the Welland Canal was built he was one of 
three commissioners appointed by the government to adjust 
claims in connection with overflowed lands near the canal. The 
other two commissioners were Messrs. 'Thorburn and Street. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



35 



In “Case and his Cotemporaries, ” by Rev. John Carroll, 
D.D., are several references to Smith Griffin. On page 302, vol. i., 
speaking of local preachers, Dr. Carroll says: “One of these was 

Smith Griffin, Esq He resided at Smithville, which 

took its cognomen from his baptismal name. He was a farmer, 
mill-owner, merchant and preacher all in one. His multifarious 
worldly engagements seemed not to abate his zeal and activity 
in the cause of God. He was once heard to say that he ‘had too 
much of his own business to attend to to occupy himself with 
any of Satan’s business.’ Although intensely busy on week days 
with secular engagements, he went far and near on the Lord’s 
day to preach. He was distinguished for liberality in advancing 
the cause of God.” On pages 140, 141 and 142, vol. ii., are sev- 
eral references to Smith Griffin, and we quote one of them: “So 
lately as 1824, he presented Egerton Ryerson with a horse, to 
encourage him, despite his father’s reluctance, to enter the itiner- 
ant field.” In vol. iii., page 9, is another short reference, and at 
page 371, vol. iv., referring to revival efforts in 1842-3, on a num- 
ber of circuits, he mentions particularly Grand River Circuits and 
Missions, saying, “The last mentioned was very powerful; it was 
largely served by old-style local preachers, who preached with 
liberty and power; such as Watson, Matthews, Bouslaugh and 
Smith Griffin.” 

In 1837 there was a great financial and mercantile depres- 
sion in the United States and Canada, in fact there are records 
of bread riots in some of the eastern States, and the policy of 
protection received a great impetus in the United States at that 
time. Among the Canadians whose business affairs were ad- 
versely affected was Smith Griffin. The scarcity of money and 
the dullness of the market for all kinds of property was intensi- 
fied by the political unrest and disturbance of that period, and 
he was unable to realize on his assets quickly enough to meet the 
demands of his foreign creditors. Rev. Dr. Carroll, on page 141, 
vol. ii., of his history, referring to this time, says that he gave up 



36 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



everything, even his homestead. He also tells a story which was 
related to him by a Presbyterian minister, of the Indians giving 
him a large tract of good land on the Grand River after his busi- 
ness failure. This may have been true in the sense that they made 
it possible for him to get possession of a part of their reserve by 
purchase, his helpfulness to some of them in former years having 
made them his friends. But on this story being shown to Mr. James 
K. Griffin, a grandson of Smith Griffin, he said, “That story is 
not correct. To my certain knowledge, my father, Ebenezer 
Griffin, and his brother Absalom, bought the 500 acres from the 
Indians, for their father’s use; Ebenezer bought out Absalom’s 
share. On the death of Smith Griffin, I, as administrator of my 
father’s estate, my father having died two years before, went 
to Brantford and divided the property among my father’s broth- 
ers. There are documents to prove this.” This statement was 
made by J. K. Griffin on 28th Oct., 1908, two years before his 
death. 

Smith Griffin was twice married ; his first wife was 
Eleanor Collver (or Culver, the name being differently spelled 
by different branches of the family). She was a daughter of 
Ebenezer Collver and grand-daughter of Rev. Jabez Collver, a 
Presbyterian minister, who was one of the pioneers of Norfolk 
County. 

CHILDREN: 

113 — Ebenezer Culver, b. Feb. 16, 1800 ; d. Sept. 28, 1847. 

114 — Elizabeth, b. Nov. 20, 1801 ; d. Aug. 25, 1889. 

115 — Mary, b. Oct. 15, 1803 ; d. Jan. 29, 1889 ; never married. 

116 — Absalom, b. Dec. 7, 1805; d. April, 1863. 

117— Henry, b. Dec. 30, 1807 ; d. July 16, 1891. 

Eleanor (Culver) Griffin died in 1812, and on June 6, 1814, 
Smith Griffin married Harriet Douglas, a most excellent 
woman, who was loved and respected by her step-children and 
their children, who “rose up and called her blessed.” She died 
Oct., 1847. 




HENRY GRIFFIN 
(See No. 117) 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



37 



CHILDREN: 

118 — Douglas, b. March 24, 1815 ; d. in 1879. 

119 — Minerva, b. June 4, 1817 ; d. same year. 

120 — Alanson, b. Oct. 15, 1819; d. April, 1893. 

121 — Sutherland Douglas, b. July 9, 1822; d. Sept., 1914. 

122 — Cyrus Ryerson, b. May 11, 1824; d. Nov. 30, 1902. 

123 — Martha Ann, b. June 19, 1826 ; d. Dec., 1834. 

124 — Samuel Stewart, b. March 2, 1829; d. Nov. 6, 1919. 

125 — Content, b. March 4, 1831 ; d. Oct., 1831. 

126 — Alvin Torry, b. Dec. 7, 1832; d. June, 1849. 

127 — Harriet Victoria, b. July, 1837 ; d. in 1869. 

Smith Griffin, died at Brantford, Ont., Sept. 28, 1849. 

NOTE — Ebenezer 'Culver (or Collver) settled in the Township of Louth, 
Lincoln (County, in or about 1793. In the register of christenings in the 
Presbyterian congregation, Niagara, the baptism of his four daughters is 
recorded, and in the Niagara register kept by Rev. Robert Addison, of 
St. Mark’s Church, Niagara, is the record of the marriage of his daughter 
Anna, thus — “'Sept. 22, 1902 — Richard Griffin, bach., and Anna Collver, 
spinster.” Ebenezer was the eldest son of Rev. Jabez Culver, a Presbyter- 
ian minister, who came from New Jersey with his four younger sons, Aaron, 
John, Jabez and Gabriel, who had married the four daughters of their 
father’s cousin, Timothy Culver, who had been in the loyalist forces during 
the war. Rev. Jabez and his family left New Jersey in 1793, made the 
journey to Canada on foot and settled in the Long Point District of Nor- 
folk County in that year. The founder of the first Presbyterian church 
of Norfolk County was Rev. Jabez Culver, who was a regularly ordained 
minister in New Jersey. He held service every Sabbath in his own house 
from the time of his arrival in the Long Point settlement until a church 
was built, when he became its pastor. 



54 

Jonathan Griffin (5), sixth son of Richard and Mary (Smith) 
Griffin, was born in 1774, married 'Sarah Culp. He died while 
serving as a soldier in the 4th Lincoln Militia in 1814. 



38 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



CHILDREN: 

128 — Abraham Culp, b. June 13, 1797 ; d. June 29, 1836. 

129 — Laney, married David Reeves of Waterdown. 

130 — Frances, b. June 9, 1803 ; d. April 12, 1874. 

131 — Mary, b. 1805; m. John Culp. 

132 — Margaret, b. 1807 ; m. a Smith. 

133 — David, b. 1809 ; d. in Illinois. 

134 — George, b. 1812; d. in 1841. 



55 

Elizabeth Griffin (5), fourth daughter of Richard and Mary 
(Smith) Griffin, born 1776; married a Mr. Lindebury. 

CHILDREN: 

135 — Joseph. 

136— Millie. 



56 

Mary Griffin (5), fifth daughter of Richard and Mary (Smith) 
Griffin, born March 5, 1778; died in 18173, aged 95 years. She 
married Isaac Wardell in 1798. Quite a romantic story of their 
first meeting, while making their way in opposite directions along 
the banks of the Jordan River, which flows through Smithville, 
is told in the Wardell family history. That volume also gives 
an informative picture of their family life, and some incidents 
showing their strength, vitality and adaptability to their circum- 
stances and surroundings. 

CHILDREN: 

137 — Deborah (Debbie), m. John Smith, son of David Smith. 

138 — Solomon, b. in 1803; d. Feb. 4, 1882. 

139 — Isaiah. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



39 



140 — Mariam, m. Matthew Tallman. 

141 — Joseph, died young. 

142 — Mary, m. Robert Smith, son of David Smith, d. May 27, 
1888. 

143 — Jacob, d. aged 88 years. 

144 — Nathaniel, b. Dec. 25, 1815; d. June 25, 1897. 

145 — Abram, b. in 1817 ; d. Sept. 27, 1907. 

146 — Harriet, b. 1818, m. Thornton Smith, son of David 
Smith; was still living in 1910. 

57 

Richard Griffin (5) , seventh son and youngest child of Rich- 
ard (4) and Mary (Smith) Griffin, born in 1780, and died at 
Smithville, Ont., in 1807. He married Annie Collver (or 
Culver), daughter of Ebenezer Collver. He was a farmer by oc- 
cupation and his descendants still occupy the same farm at Smith- 
ville. In the Militia List for 1804 he appears as ensign in 2nd 
West Lincoln Regiment. 

CHILDREN: 

147 — James, born 1803 ; died in infancy. 

148 — Richard Collver, born 1805; died Nov. 5, 1889. 



40 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



7th GENERATION 

58 

Aibraham Griffin (6), son of Abraham and Mary (Roy) 
Griffin, was born May 26th, 1798; died Oct. 28, 1842. He married 
Hannah Stocking, July 4, 1822. 

CHILDREN: 

149 — Eliza Jane, b. Dec. 1824; died since 1900. 

150 — Abraham, b. July 29, 1826 ; d. Feb., 1888. 

151— Timothy, b. 1829 ; d. 1870. 

152— Orrin, b. 1831 ; d. 1885. 



59 

Edward Griffin (6), son of Abraham and Mary (Roy) 
Griffin, born Jan. 12, 1801; married Aug. 20, 1829, to Sarah 
Thomas. They had several children, but we have record of only 
two, the eldest and youngest. 

CHILDREN: 

153 — Abraham, b. 1830. 

154 — John Wesley, b. Aug. 12, 1849; m. Oct. 7, 1880, Lydia 
Roderick. She was born Oct. 7, 1862. 



70 

Mary Hill (6), daughter of Solomon and Bethiah (Griffin) 
Hill, born in 1791; married Robert Waddell, who was born Aug. 
1, 1793. He was a clerk in the store and post office of her uncle, 
Smith Griffin. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



41 



CHILDREN : 

155 — Jane. 

156 — Francis. 

157 — Marie. 

158 — Robert. 

159 — Margaret. 

160 — Harriet, married William Patterson, Oct. 12, 1856. 

161 — Julia. 

162— -Eliza. 



79 

Smith Griffin (6), second son of Edward and Deborah (War- 
dell) Griffin, born in 1800; was a farmer, and in religion a Meth- 
odist. He married Betsy Edmunds, and in 1839 settled in the 
newly opened township of Erin, where they had the strenuous 
work of clearing the forest from their farm and endured the 
hardships of pioneer life. 

CHILDREN: 

163 — Danford, born in Smithville, in or about 1824. 

164 — Huldah, b. in Smithville ; m. Henry Adams ; d. in 1860 
in Hanover, Ont. 

165 — Kelly, b. in Smithville, 1828. Was a carpenter; d. 1919. 

166 — Baldwin, b. 1830, in Smithville ; a farmer in Erin, 1894. 

167 — Mary, b. 1832, in Smithville; m. John Kenny; had five 
children; d. in Bothwell, 1880. 

168 — Emily, b. 1834, in Smithville; m. Henry Adams; had 
six children. Died in Hanover. 

169 — Deborah, b. in Smithville; m. Henry Woodward; four 
children. 

170 — William Murray, b. 1837, in Smithville. 

171 — Eliza Jane, b. 1841, in Erin; m. Robert Fisher; one child. 
She died in 1857. 

172 — Margaret Ann, b. 1844; died in Ridgetown. 

Smith Griffin died in July, 1859, in Erin, Ont. 



42 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



80 

Isaac Griffin (6), third son of Edward and Deborah (War- 
dell) Griffin, born in Smithville, Ont., about 1802; married, first, 
Miss Disher. 

CHILDREN: 

173 — Isaac Smith. 

174 — Allen. 

175 — David. 

176 — James. 

177 — Catharine, married Daniel Orth, a potter. 

His first wife having died, Isaac married a second wife, but 
we have not been able to learn her name, nor the names of their 
two sons and a daughter. 



86 

Jacob Griffin (6), son of Edward (5) and Mary (Lounsbury) 
Griffin, born in 1816 ; died Sept. 3, 1861 ; was a Methodist in re- 
ligion, a farmer by occupation. He married twice, his first wife 
being Catharine Adams. 

CHILD: 

178 — Juliet, b. 1842; m. Isaac Swayzie. 

His second wife was Mrs. Annie Teeter. 

CHILD: 

179 — Harriet Augusta, b. May 1, 1858. 

88 

Jonathan Wesley Griffin (6), son of Edward and Mary 
(Lounsbury) Griffin, was born Aug. 8, 1821; died at Dunnville, 
Ont., March 11, 1888. He was a licensed local preacher of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Married Mary Elizabeth Hurst, 
Jan. 14, 1846. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



43 



CHILDREN: 

180 — Wesley, b. Oct. 11, 1847 ; d. Dec. 6, 1847. 

181 — W. Nelson, b. Nov. 7, 1849, at Canboro, Monck Co. 

89 

Morrel Griffin (6), son of Edward and Mary (Lounsbury) 
Griffin, was born at Smithville, April 4, 1823; married Mar- 
garet Hurst, at Grimsby, Ont., Dec. 12., 1'840. Settled later in 
Dunnville. He died April 2, 1901. 

OHILDREN: 

182 — Mary Catharine, b. at Grimsby, Nov. 27, 1841 ; m. Sim- 
coe Swayzie. 

183 — James Edward, b. at Smithville, June 30, 1850. 

103 

Diavid Griffin (6 ) , son of Isaiah and Susannah (Culp) 
Griffin, was born at Smithville, May 7, 1797. He became a minis- 
ter of the Methodist Episcopal Church and itinerated for many 
years ; at the time of his death he was the oldest minister in the 
Methodist Conference. He died at Vienna, Ont., Dec. 6, 1886, in 
his ninetieth year. Was twice married, first to Catharine 
Cline. 

CHILD: 

184 — Catharine, who married a Mr. Pettit. 

The second wife was Miss Katie . 

OHILDREN: 

185 — Susan, married Rev. Wm. Yokom. 

186 — Mary. 

187 — Harriet. 



44 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



188 — Matilda. 

189— Elida. 

190 — John Wesley. 

191 — Jonas. 

192 — Jacob. 

193 — Elgin. 

Rev. David Griffin is mentioned in Dr. Carroll’s “Case and 
his Cotemporaries” as a local preacher who did good work, vol. 
iii., p. 330: “David Griffin, a nephew of the celebrated Smith 
Griffin, was employed to supply the vacancy. A letter from him 
in the Guardian, dated Dec. 21st, 1831, says : ‘ The Lord is favor- 
ing us with His blessing. From the 10th to the 20th of November 
we received 30 members on trial.” On page 381 of the same 
volume he is spoken of again. In Rev. Thos. Webster’s “History 
of the M. E. Church in Canada,” on pages 267-270, is a resolu- 
tion of protest against the union of the M. E. Church of Canada 
with the Wesley ans of England, citing 10 objections. This was 
dated at Smithville, Nov., 1832, and was signed by seven local 
preachers, David Griffin and Elijah Warren being among them. 



104 

Nathaniel Griffin (6), son of Isaiah and Susannah (Culp) 
Griffin, was born at Smithville, Ont., June 26, 1799, and died Dec. 
13, 1853. He married Sarah Adams, March 24, 1818, at 
Grimsby, where were born their six children. 

CHILDREN: 

194 — Maria A. 

195 — William Ryerson, b. March 30, 1827. 

196 — Thomas I., b. July 16, 1829. 

197 — Phoebe Jane, b. June 29, 1834; m. 1852, Levi Claus. 

198 — Lorenzo, b. Jan. 16, 1836 ; d. in 1841. 




BURWELL GRIFFIN 
(See No. 434) 



SOLOMON GRIFFIN 
(at 90 years of age) 
(See No. 107) 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



45 



199 — Robert A., b. June 22, 1837 ; m. in 1870, Miss Mary 
Stearns ; d. in 1885. 

Nathaniel died as the result of an accident. 



106 

Isaac 'Griffin ('6), son of Isaiah and Susannah (Gulp) Griffin, 
born at Smithville, Ont., June 19, 1803 ; died at Stanwood, Mich., 
Dec. 24, 1887. He married Bianca — . No positive rec- 

ord available regarding his children ; a sister-in-law and a niece 
believe the following to be a correct list, the two last being twins : 

'CHILDREN: 

200— Allen. 

201 — Martha. 

202 — David. 

203 — James. 

204 — Sarah. 

205 — William. 

206 — Mary. 



107 

Solomon Griffin ( l 6), son of Isaiah and Susannah (Culp) 
Griffin, was born at 'Smithville, June 30, 1805; died at Waterdown, 
Ontario, August 30, 1896, in his 92nd year. He married 
Mary Teeple and settled on a farm in Nelson Township, Co. 
Halton. Shortly afterward he removed to Waterdown and 
assisted his cousins, Ebenezer and Absalom in their milling busi- 
ness and other ventures. Mrs. Mary (Teeple) Griffin died in 
Nov., 1890, at the age of 78 years and 9 months. Prom that time 
till his death Solomon lived with a grandson. 



46 



A PIONEEK FAMILY 



'CHILDREN: 

207— Burwell, b. May 6, 1828 ; d. in 1886. 

208 — Sarah, b. in 1831. 

209 — Catharine. 

210 — Bridget Ann, m. Wm. Teetzel, Oct. 31, 1854; d. in 1920. 

211 — David, died in infancy. 

212 — James, died in infancy. 

213 — Ebenezer Franklin, b. 1849; died in 1857. 

From Hamilton Spectator, Sept. 8, 1896 : 

ANOTHER PIONEER DEAD. 

One by one the few remaining pioneers of Wentworth and ad- 
joining counties are passing away. In Waterdown, to-day, was 
buried one of the early settlers of that village, Solomon Griffin, who 
died at the residence of his grandson, W. S. Griffin, near Water- 
down, Sunday evening, Sept. 6, 1896. His father, Isaiah Griffin, was 
a U. E. Loyalist, who came to Canada from Duchess Co., New York, 
in 1787 ; he served in the Lincoln militia during the war of 1812, 
and his son Solomon had many stories of war times stored away 
in his memory, he being seven years old when the war commenced. 
About the year 1832 he purchased property in Waterdown from 
his cousin, Ebenezer C. Griffin, who had laid out and surveyed 
the village site in 1831. For many years he was engaged in the 
mills and other works of E. C. and Absalom Griffin, and by his 
intelligence and activity did much to promote the growth and 
welfare of the village. For nearly 75 years he was a consistent 
member of the Methodist church, and during most of those years 
was a class leader and local preacher. In politics Solomon 
Griffin was a Reformer and was an active politician when this 
constituency included St. Catharines, Hamilton and Waterdown, 
and when Reformers worked for real reforms, demanding for the 
people civil and religious rights which were then denied. Like 
many others he continued his allegiance to and belief in the party 
when its only aim became a struggle for office. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



47 



108 

Susannah Griffin (16), daughter of Isaiah and Susannah 
(Culp) Griffin, was born Oct. 17, 1807 ; married Daniel Springer. 

'CHILDREN: 

214 — Cordelia. 

215 — Eunice. 

216 — Margaret. 

217 — Isaac. 

218 — Richard. 

219 — Adaline. 



109 

Sarah Griffin (6), daughter of Isaiah and Susannah (Culp) 
Griffin, born at Smithville, Nov. 16, 1909; married Solomon Tay- 
lor. They are said to have had three daughters, as follows: 

220 — Almira. 

221 — Susan. 

222 — Margaret. 

110 

Robert Allen Griffin (6), son of Isaiah and Susannah (Culp) 
Griffin, born at Smithville, Ont., Aug. 5, 1811 ; married Margaret 
Johnson. 

'CHILDREN : 

223 — Isabel, m. Mr. Craus. 

224 — Solomon. 

225 — James. 

226 — George, killed by accident. 

227 — Peter Johnson, m. Miss Tapley. 



48 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



228 — Sophronia, m. a Mr. Johnson. 

229 — Mary, m. a Mr. Johnson. 

230 — Elizabeth. 

231 — Enos. 



Ill 

Smith Culp Griffin ('&), son of Isaiah and Susannah (Culp) 
Griffin ; b. May 25, 1814, at Smithville ; died at Kilbride, Ont., in 
1894. Married Eliza Jane Eaton. 



'CHILDREN: 

232 — Cyrus Smith, b. Sept, 16, 1849 ; m. Miss Galloway. 
They had one son whose name has not been learned. 

233 — Emma Ann, b. Nov. 24, 1851 ; m. John Moore. 

234 — Sarah Catharine, b. Dec. 7, 1853; m. Mr. Bates. 

235 — Charlotte Jane, b. Feb. 4, 1856; m. Edward Tansley. 

236 — Jackson Columbus, b. April 21, 1858. 

237 — William Oscar, b. April 23, 1861. 



112 

William Henry ('6), youngest son of Isaiah and Susannah 
(Culp) Griffin, born Feb. 17, 1817. Married Mary Sykes, 
of Leeds, England. He was a school teacher. Died at Brantford, 
Ont., May 11, 1887. 

CHILDREN: 

238 — Caroline Amelia, b. Feb. 22, 1843. 

239— Serina Matilda, b. Feb. 23, 1845; d. June, 1914. 

240 — Augusta, b. Nov. 27, 1847 ; m. Chas. F. Gordon, of 
Montreal. No children. 

241 — Columbus, b. Feb. 10, 1849; d. at Waterdown, Aug. 17, 
1849. 




JAMES KENT GRIFFIN GEORGE DOUGLAS GRIFFIN REV. WILLIAM SMITH GRIFFIN, D.D. 
(See No. 249) (See No. 250) (See No. 251) 




A PIONEER FAMILY 



49 



242 — Eleanor Catharine, b. Feb., 1853 ; m. Lindsay Crawford, 
of Hamilton. No children. 

243 — Ada Byron, b. July 18, 1854; m. Dr. W. T. James of 
Brantford, March, 1878. No children. 

244 — Alvaretta Pauline, b. July 4, 1857 ; m. Geo. Lee, Toronto, 
April, 1888. No children. 

245 — Minnie Brant, b. July 27, 1859 ; m. W. J. Nichol, Toronto. 

246 — Melbourne Scott, b. Dec. 29, 1861 ; m. Margarite 

247 — Robert Edmund Lee, b. Jan. 4, 1866. 

248 — Josephine Brock, b. Jan. 8, 1870; is principal of a school 
in Toronto. 

113 

Ebenezer Culver Griffin (6), eldest son of Smith and Eleanor 
(Culver) Griffin, was born at Smithville, Feb. 16, 1800. He mar- 
ried Eliza Kent, daughter of Capt. William Kent, of Stoney 
Creek, Township of Saltfleet, in 1821. In 182$ Elbenezer C. 
Griffin bought from Col. Alexander Brown 860 acres of land 
where the village of Waterdown now stands and about 200 acres 
adjoining on the south from Wm. Applegarth. There were several 
mill sites on Limestone Creek, which runs through these 540 
acres, and he built first a sawmill at the falls, just below the 
present Mill street crossing on the creek. Later he built a flour 
mill a little farther down stream, just above the greater falls. 
This was completed in 1827 or 1828, and his eldest son, a little 
boy of four or five, turned on the water, an act of which he de- 
lighted to tell in his old age. E. C. Griffin sold to his brother 
Absalom 150 acres north of Dundas street. He built and operated 
a mill for the manufacture of cloth, carpets, etc. He and his 
brother Absalom also carried on a mercantile business. Another 
of his enterprises was to survey a village site and induce other 
manufacturers and business men to settle there, thus a thriving 
village was formed. He was during many years the only magis- 
trate in that vicinity, and according to the story of a gentleman 



4 



50 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



who was for many years township clerk of East Flamboro, he 
was disposed to be lenient as well as just in his decisions, and 
flavored his judgments with humor. He held a commission in 
the 8th Regiment of 'Gore Militia at the time of the rebellion of 
1837-38. He was a Methodist and took his religion seriously, 
giving a working as well as a financial support to its undertak- 
ings. It is recorded that he was superintendent of the Sunday 
School in Smithville, in 1820. (See Hamilton Times of Feb. 14, 
1903.) He died Oct. 17, 1847, and his wife died three months 
afterward, Jan. 17, 1848. 

CHILDREN: 

249 — James Kent, b. Feb. 16, 1823 ; d. Sept. 21, 1910. 

250 — George Douglas, b. Aug. 12, 1824; d. March 14, 1911. 

251 — William Smith, b. Oct. 10, 1826 ; d. Oct. 17, 1917. 

252 — Egerton Ryerson, b. March 17, 1829 ; d. Aug. 6, 1897. 

253 — Eleanor Rebecca, b. June 1, 1831 ; still living. 

254 — Franklin Metcalf, b. June 10, 1833 ; d. June 4, 1877. 

255 — Watson Ebenezer, b. 1835; d. Aug. 4, 1914. 

256— Caroline, b. 1837 ; d. in 1841. 

257 — Charles Wesley, b. 1839; d. in 1841. 

258 — Eliza Augusta, b. June 1, 1842; d. Aug. 6, 1923. 

259 — Henry Augustus, b. April 10, 1844; d. July 17, 1904. 



Note — William Kent, the father of Mrs. Ebenezer C. Griffin, changed 
his name from Smithers to Kent after his arrival in 'Canada. He came to 
Canada when seventeen years of age with his brother-in-law the Count de 
Puisaye, who was the head of a colony of French loyalist emigres who 
came over in Oct., 1797, under the auspices of the British Government, and 
received large grants of land north of Toronto. Mr. Kent settled near 
Stoney Creek, Township of Saltfleet, on a farm afterwards known as “The 
Salt Works Farm/’ where he manufactured salt from the saline spring. 
He also had a trading post at IStoney Creek, and is spoken of by Hon. Rich- 
ard Cartwright, in one of his letters, as “'The Count de Puysaye’s young 
friend, Mr. Kent. ’ ’ His son-in-law, E. C. Griffin, was associated with him 
in the Salt Works for some time. In the register of marriages kept by 
Rev. Robert Addison at Niagara is the following record: “Sept. 21, 1802 — 
William Kent, bach., and Rebecca Bradshaw, spinster.” Rebecca Brad- 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



51 



shaw’s father was one of the many Quaker loyalists who settled in 'Can- 
ada fter the war of the revolution in the thirteen colonies to the south of 
this country. One of her sisters married a Bostwick, of Norfolk township. 
G. K. Bradshaw, a popular Methodist preacher, now (1924) stationed in 
Hamilton, is descended from a brother of these ladies. 



114 

Elizabeth 'Griffin (16), eldest daughter of Smith and Eleanor 
(Culver) Griffin, b. Nov. (20, 1801, at ISmithville, Ont, She mar- 
ried, July, 181)8, Rev. Elijah Warren. They removed to Michigan 
in 1847 and settled on a farm in Whiteford township, Munro Co., 
where she died Aug. '25, 1 889 . They had five children, of whom 
we have the names of one son and one daughter, viz. : 

260— C. A. 

261 — Elizabeth. 



116 

Absalom Griffin (6), second son of Smith and Eleanor (Cul- 
ver) Griffin, born Dec. 7, 1805, at Smithville, Ont. ; married Miss 
Harriet Smith, a niece of his step-mother. He settled in Water- 
down, and entered into partnership with his brother Ebenezer 
in some of his enterprises. After the dissolution of the partner- 
ship he continued in the milling business till his death in 1863. 
An officer in the militia, he contracted a severe cold in 1837, when 
warning his men for duty, and his constitution was so weakened 
that he never regained robust health. He was a sincere and de- 
vout Christian, of a very genial and kindly character, a lover of 
children, who were very fond of him. The present writer re- 
members him well. 



52 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



'CHILDREN : 

262 — Charlotte, b. 1829; d. in 1853 or 1854. 

263 — Ransom C., b. March 22, 1831 ; drowned in Hamilton 
Bay, 1850. 

264 — Martha Ann, b. 1833; d. Nov. 30, 1900. 

265— Eliza, b. 1835 ; d. 1858. 

117 

Henry Griffin (6), son of Smith and Eleanor (Culver) Griffin, 
born at Smithville, Ont., Dec. 30, 1807 ; died at Grand Haven, Mich., 
July 16, 1891. In 1826 he became a partner of his father in 
the business carried on at Grimsby, where he met and married 
Rachael Eastman, daughter of Rev. Daniel Ward Eastman, 
popularly known as Father Eastman, a Presbyterian minister, 
who is said to have married more couples than any other clergy- 
man in Canada. At that time no one could perform a legal mar- 
riage ceremony except the clergy of the established churches of 
England and iScotland, or in certain circumstances a magistrate. 
Henry Griffin and Rachael Eastman were married May 30, 1830. 
In or about 1827 or 1828, he established a branch store in Ham- 
ilton at the north-east corner of King and John streets, in a frame 
building, beside which he erected the first brick business build- 
ing in Hamilton ; one of these buildings was used as a tailor shop. 
He later sold this property — a quarter acre of land and the 
buildings to Thomas and Ebenezer Stinson. In 183i7, owing to the 
business depression and the unsettled condition caused by the 
rebellion at that time, his business became financially involved 
and he removed to Michigan and settled at Grand Haven, where 
he conducted a drug business and resided the remainder of his 
life. He served a term as State Senator and was also at one time 
sheriff of the county. He died July 16, 1891. About two years 
before his death he visited me in Hamilton, Ont., and related 
many incidents of early days. One of these was to this effect: 
“One day during the war of 1812-14, another boy and I were 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



53 



playing in a field near the road when a troup of United States 
Cavalry came along. They had the letters U. S. L. D. on their 
hats. We shouted ‘Uncle Sam’s lazy devils.’ An officer rode 
toward us waving his sword, and we scampered away across the 
field.” 

CHILDREN: 

266 — Hannibal Rathbun, b. March 15, 1831 ; died young. 

267 — Elizabeth Olivia, b. Dec. 14, 1833, at Grimsby; still 
living. 

268 — Maria Louisa, b. July 2, 1837 ; d. Aug. 15, 1839. 

269 — Rachael Eleanor, b. Sept. 8, 1850. 

Extracts from an article in Grand Haven Journal, July, 1891 : 

“Thursday morning, July 16, ex-Mayor Henry Griffin passed 
away. The departure of a man who has been a pilgrim on the 
earth 83 years, a resident in our County 53 years, and for 47 
years a citizen of our town, warrants us in stopping and taking 
note of the event.” (Here follows an account of his early life 
in Canada.) “In 1838 he removed his family to this county, 
coming around through the lakes. In 1844, having been elected 
sheriff of the county, he removed to Grand Haven, his home till 
his death. Here he was for many years Justice of the Peace, and 
was also elected Clerk of the County and Court. In 1858 Aider- 
man of the Second Ward, and in 1871 was Mayor of the city. 
When not engaged in official duties he was a druggist and com- 
mission merchant. 

“In early manhood he made profession of his faith in Christ 
by joining the Presbyterian church in Grimsby, Ontario, of which 
in 1833 he was Ruling Elder, to which office in the Presbyterian 
church in this city he was elected in 1847. From 1879 he was 
President of Ottawa County Bible Society.” 

(The paper also gave an extended account of a special meet- 
ing of the Council of the city on July 17, 1891, when the presi- 



54 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



dent gave eloquent testimony to the many public services of 
ex-Mayor Griffin, and the Council resolved to attend his funeral 
in a body and to otherwise mark their respect for him.) 



120 

Alanson Griffin (6), son of Smith and Harriet (Douglas) 
Griffin, was born Oct. 15, 1819. He was for many years Superin- 
tendent of the Government School and Farm for the instruction 
of the Indians on the Grand River, near Brantford, Ont. He mar- 
ried Julia Ellice, March 8, 1843^ 

ICHILDREN: 

270 — Charles, b. Dec., 1843; d. May 17, 1862. 

271 — Maria, b. 1847 ; m. Robert M. Wilson. 

Alanson Griffin died at Brantford, April, 1893. 

121 

Sutherland Douglas Griffin (6), son of Smith and Harriet 
(Douglas) Griffin, born July 9, 1822, at Smithville, Ont., m. in 
1848, Martha Leonard. He resided in or near Brantford until 
June, 1880, when he went to South Dakota and took up a home- 
stead of 160 acres at Thomas, Hamlin County. He died there in 
Sept., 1914, in his 93rd year. 

iCHILDREN: 

272 — Arthur, b. 1849 ; d. young. 

273 — Harriet Sarah, b. May 19, 1850; m. George Vidal Salter, 
Aug. 6, 1875; d. April 26, 1899. 

274— Walter H., b. Oct. 31, 1852 ; d. Jan. 27, 1924. 

275 — Francis Leonard, b. Feb. 28, 1854. 

276 — Robert W., b. March 31, 1856. 

277— Elizabeth M. W., b. Nov. 6, 1863. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



55 



Francis L. and Robert W. Griffin, sons of Sutherland, like 
many of their ancestors possessed of wanderlust, went to New 
Zealand. After a short stay they returned to America by way 
of South Africa. They arrived at Capetown just when the Zulu 
War broke out and they enlisted as gentlemen volunteers in a 
British regiment for the war. The regiment saw very hard 
service and lost a large proportion of its men. But these Cana- 
dians came through uninjured. After the war they came home. 



122 

Cyrus Ryerson Griffin (6), son of Smith and Harriet (Doug- 
las) Griffin, born at Smithville, Ont., May 12, 1824; removed to 
Brantford with his father in 183)8; was a farmer by occupation, 
Methodist in religion. Married Mary M. Nellis, March 13, 
1849. 

'CHILDREN: 

278 — Colborne Nellis, b. Jan. 9, 1850. 

279 — Jane E., b. Nov. 8, 1851; d. Dec. 5, 1861. 

280— Mary A., b. May 25, 1853 ; d. Dec. 5, 1861. 

281 — Harriet A., b. Aug. 26, 1858 ; m. J. H. Simmons ; d. Oct. 
19, 1884. 

282 — Clara B., b. Sept. 6, 1860 ; d. March, 1862. 

283 — Ariel F., b. June 18, 1863; m. Geo. Elliott, 29th June, 
1887; d. Aug. 19, 1887. 

284— Helen A, b. July 18, 1865 ; d. Dec. 19, 1865. 

285— Wesley E., b. Nov. 27, 1867 ; d. Dec. 12, 1867. 

Cyrus R. Griffin died Nov. 30, 1903, and Mrs. Griffin died 
March 25, 1904. 



124 

Samuel Stewart Griffin (6), son of Smith and Harriet (Doug- 
las) Griffin, was born March 2, 1829. He ran away to sea when 
a boy and after several years of seafaring life settled in Australia, 



56 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



about 1850, and ran a line of stages from the market town to the 
country districts. These lines (coach lines, they called them) 
lost their reason for being when railroads were introduced. He 
then removed to New Zealand and engaged in the same line of 
business until the iron horse again superceded the coaches. He 
died at Christchurch, New Zealand, Nov. '6, 1919, in his 91st year. 
On iSept. 20, 185*5, at Melbourne, Australia, he married Miss Cath- 
arine Finegin. ' 

CHILDREN: 

286 — Marian, b. at Melbourne, Sept. 11, 1856. 

287 — Edmund Alvin, b. at Castlemaine, Sept. 27, 1860. 

288 — Harriet Adeline, b. at Castlemaine, Nov. 3, 1862, d. Jan. 
13, 1864. 

289 — Harriet Annie, b. at Timaru, New Zealand, Jan. 22, 1865. 

290 — William Watson, b. at Timaru, N. Z., Oct. 7, 1869. 

William Watson is now a physician in Brighton, England. 

The leading newspaper of Christchurch, New Zealand, in 
Nov., 1919, published a portrait and a lengthy account of the life 
of Samuel S. Griffin, from which the following brief extracts are 
taken : 

‘ ‘ There has recently passed away in Christchurch, in the per- 
son of Mr. Samuel Stewart Griffin, a connecting link with the 
by-gone days, before the advent of the railways and motor-cars. 
He was born at Smithville, near Brantford, Canada, in 1829. 
Farming being too dull for his ardent temperament he went to 
sea soon after leaving school, sailing round the world several 
times. His imagination being fired by the gold discoveries in 
Australia, he arrived on the Victorian goldfields in 1852. After 
trying his luck as a digger he took charge of a store at Forest 
Creek. When his employers inaugurated a coaching service he 
commenced driving for them in 1857, running from Castlemaine 
to Creswell’s Flats. In 1862 he left for New Zealand. An at- 
tempt as gold digger on the Otago fields convinced him that he 




MRS. RACHAEL ELEANOR (GRIFFIN) McNETT 
(See No. 269) 




A PIONEER FAMILY 



57 



better go back to coaching, and he was engaged to assist in 
opening the new service of Cobb & Co. in Canterbury. At a later 
date he drove the southern portion of the road, making his home 
in Timaru, and eventually became proprietor of the Timaru- 
Temuka coach. His cheery disposition and kindness of heart 
made him deservedly popular, and many a grey-bearded man 
remembers riding alongside ‘The Major/ as he was called, and 
learning to handle a four-in-hand, the American method of hold- 
ing the reins, and how to half turn the body when using the 
whip to avoid striking a passenger. It makes one proud to have 
known such men as our friend, who endured the hardships, 
dangers and difficulties common to the ‘roaring days’ of Cobb 
& Co..” 

127 

Harriet Victoria Griffin (6), daughter of Smith and Harriet 
(Douglas) Griffin, born July 27, 1837; married Dec. 27, 1854, 
Orren H. Lawrence; died in 1869. 

CHILDREN : 

291— Mary E., b. May 30, 1856. 

292 — Julia H., b. May 23, 1858. 

293 — Charles 0., b. March 25, 1860. 

294 — Cyrus E., b. April 4, 1862. 

295 — Clara M., b. April 4, 1864. 

296— Jane V., b. Dec. 7, 1866. 



128 

Abraham Culp Griffin (6), son of Jonathan and Sarah (Culp) 
Griffin, born at Smithville, Ont., June 13, 1797 ; married Charity 
Smuck, of Waterdown. She was born Sept. 24, 1807. He died 
July 29, 1836. 



58 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



CHILDREN: 

297 — Jacob Anson, b. March 17, 1828. 

298 — James Nelson, b. Oct. 20, 1830. 

299 — George Erastus, b. Feb. 15, 1833. 

300 — Mary Eleanor, b. May 27, 1835. 



137 

i 

Deborah (Debbie) Wardell (6), eldest daughter of Isaac and 
Mary (Griffin) Wardell, was born in or about 1799. After re- 
ceiving a thorough training in all the arts and accomplishments 
necessary for a good housekeeper, some of which have already 
been referred to, she married, about 1822, Mr. John Smith, son of 
David Smith. The newly wedded couple located in the township 
of Erin, then a tangled wilderness. 

CHILDREN: 

301 — Mary, who married Danford Griffin. She died in 1869. 

302 — David, born in 1832; d. in Erin, in 1901, on the farm 
where he was born, and where he spent his life. 



138 

Solomon Wardell (6), son of Isaac and Mary (Griffin) War- 
dell, born in 1803, married, first, Anne Culp, daughter of Jacob 
Culp. In 1834 he settled in the township of Rainham, on the 
shore of Lake Erie, and remained there till his death on the 4th 
February, 1882. For forty years he was a consistent member of 
the Baptist Church and for many years a deacon. By his first 
wife he had twelve children. 

CHILDREN: 

303 — Elizabeth, married Thomas Van Loon. 

304 — Hiram, b. in 1831 ; died in Toronto, May 22, 1904. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



59 



305 — Jacob. 

306 — Isaac, b. 1834; died at bis home in Toronto, in 1909. 

307 — Orrin, settled in Detroit. 

308 — Mary, married William Smith, farmer. 

309 — William, became a business man in Toronto. 

310 — Matthew, a merchant in Huntsville. 

311 — Joseph, settled in Detroit, Mich. 

312 — Almedia, married Thomas Harris. 

313 — Alfred, settled in Edmonton, Alberta. 

314 — John Calvin, became a resident of Michigan. 

Some time after the death of his first wife Solomon married, 
second, Mary Hare, who died in 1909, aged 87 years. 

•CHILDREN: 

315 — Frank, married Wm. Beal. 

316 — Solomon. 

317 — Eva. 

318 — James, who inherited the homestead. 

When the telegraph despatch called the children of Solomon 
Wardell to his side in his last illness, fifteen of them, ten sons 
and five daughters, arrived to cheer him in his dying moments. 



139 

Isaiah Wardell (6), third child of Isaac and Mary (Griffin) 
Wardell, married Elizabeth Tinline Culp. 



CHILDREN: 

319 — Cyrus. 

320 — James, settled in New Mexico. 

321 — Isaac. 

After the death of his first wife, Isaiah married Margaret 
Tinline, by whom he had the following eleven children . 



60 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



CHILDREN: 

322 — Jacob, a farmer, died at Caistor, Ont., in 1908. 

323 — Isabel, m. John Merritt; died in Saginaw, Mich. 

324 — John, died young. 

325 — Alfred, died young. 

326 — Douglas, a farmer, near Dunnville. 

327 — George — never married. 

328 — William, a successful lumberman in Duluth, Minn. 

329 — Mary Ann, died in Dunnville. 

330 — Martha, m. Mansell McCollum, of Dunnville. 

331 — Jane, married Frank Price, of Hamilton. 

332 — Richard, a carpenter, of Beamsville, Ont. 

140 

Mariam Wardell (6), daughter of Isaac and Mary (Griffin) 
Warded, married Matthew Tallman. 

CHILDREN: 

333 — Isaac, a Methodist minister. 

334 — Mary, married Henry Culp; died at Jordan, Ont. 

335 — Daniel Culp, m. Hannah Griffin. 

336 — Jane, m. Cornelius Smith, of Courtwright, Ont. 

337 — Matthew, died in Michigan. 

338 — Annie, m. Adam Zimmerman. 

339 — Peter, a merchant in Beamsville, died there. 

340 — Deborah, m. John Dixon; they settled in Dunnville. 

341 — Oliver, a farmer on the old homestead. 

342 — Margaret, m. Robert Walker, of Beamsville. 

142 

Mary Warded (6), daughter of Isaac and Mary (Griffin) 
Warded, married Robert Smith. They resided in Houghton, Ont., 
many years. She died May 27, 1888, and her husband died March 
3, 1893. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



61 



CHILDREN: 

343 — Elizabeth, married Isaac Culp. 

344 — Harriet, married Webber Williams, of Fairground, Ont. 

345 — Rachel, married Amos Gadsby, Toronto, Ont. 

346 — David, a merchant at Victoria Square, Ont. 

347 — Isaac, a carpenter at Selkirk, Ont. 

348 — Isaiah, died Dec. 3, 1898. 

349 — Elias 0., a merchant in Toronto. 

350 — Mary Ann, married, first, Leaman Parney. Her second 
husband was John Messecer, Fairground, Ont. 

351 — Solomon, farmer, inherited his father’s farm in Fair- 
ground, Ont. 

352 — Robert N., a farmer at Fairground, Ont. 

143 

Jacob Wardell (6), son of Isaac and Mary (Griffin) War- 
dell, married Margaret Gregory. He died at the age of 88 years 
and was buried at Beamsville, Ont. 

CHILDREN : 

353 — Elizabeth, married a Mr. Ryckman. 

354 — Mary, married James Ryckman. 

355 — Philip, settled in Rochester, N. Y. 

356 — Darius, made his home in Guelph, Ont. 

357 — Wallace, was living in Washington, U. S., in 1910. 

358 — Eliza. 

359 — John, settled in Michigan. 

360 — Martha, married Jas. Serby. 

144 

Nathaniel Wardell (6), son of Isaac and Mary (Griffin) War- 
dell, was born December 25, 1815; married Mary Ann Teeter. 
They made their home on a farm near Smithville and celebrated 



62 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



their golden wedding there in 1885. They died wihtin a few 
days of each other. She passed away June 21st, 1897, and he 
died on the 25th June, 1897. 

CHILDREN : 

361 — Solomon. 

362 — Isaac, a lumber merchant at Victoria Harbor. 

363 — Silas, was residing in Grimsby in 1910. 

364 — Almeda, married Alonzo Bessy; d. in 1903. 

145 

Abram Wardell (6), son of Isaac and Mary (Griffin) War- 
dell, born in 1817 ; died Sept. 27, 1907. He was a farmer and 
lived for many years on his farm in Rainham. He married 
Frances Culp, daughter of Aaron Culp. 

CHILDREN: 

365 — Mary Jane, married Daniel Fradenburgh. 

366 — Nathaniel, died in Chicago. 

367 — Augusta, married James Field. 

368 — Aaron, drowned in his youth. 

369 — Cynthia, married Daniel Smith. 

370 — Alborn, a carpenter at Campden, Ont. 

371 — Elias A., a builder and contractor in Detroit, Mich. 

372 — Warner, settled in California. 

373 — Emma C., an artist, residing in Riverside, California. 

374 — Manford, residing in West Toronto. 

146 

Harriet Wardell (6), the tenth child of Isaac and Mary 
(Griffin) Wardell, born in 1818, was living in 1910, when the 
Wardell family history was published. She married Thomson 
Smith. . . 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



63 



CHILDREN : 

375 — Matthew, a fruit grower at Newport, Ont. 

376— Mary Jane, married Harvey Lundy. 

377 — Abram, a commercial traveller, Toronto. 

378 — William, farmer in Onaway, Mich. 

379 — Elizabeth, married Joseph Parker. 

380 — Nathaniel, a blacksmith. 

381 — Eileen. 

382 — Oscar, a farmer at Blytheswood, Essex Co. 

383 — Albert. 

148 

Richard Collver Griffin (6), son of Richard and Annie (Coll- 
ver or Culver) Griffin, was born Sept. 5, 1805 ; married at Niagara, 
May 1, 1827, to Mehitable Ackard, of Duchess Co., N. Y., who 
was born in 1808. His parents died when he was very young 
and he was brought up by his grandfather, Ebenezer Collver, 
Esq. In 1827 he took possession of the farm of 140 acres at 
Smithville, left him by his father, and remained there till his 
death, Nov. 16, 1886. His widow died April 26, 1893. The farm 
is now occupied by his grandsons. 

CHILDREN: 

384— Priscilla, b. July 31, 1836 ; d. May 17, 1899. 

385 — Jane, b. July 7, 1840; m. Richard Cobb, Jan. 1, 1856. 

386 — James Harvey, b. Sept. 5, 1842; d. Dec. 25, 1917. 

387 — Annie Elizabeth, b. Nov. 21, 1847. 

Frank E. Page, in his “Story of Smithville,” bears testimony 
to the kind-heartedness and benevolence of Richard C. Griffin, 
and I quote one of his illustrative stories : 

“Yankee Jones was ill with an incurable disease. His 
family had little with which to provide fuel and food. A heavy 



64 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



snow-storm visited the district after which the thermometer fell 
several degrees. Richard Griffin and his son Harvey were in the 
village and Richard had a burning curiosity to peek into Yankee 
Jones’s barn. Whether Harvey knew the cause of this curiosity 
we cannot say, but at any rate they stole unobserved to the back 
of Yankee’s barn and peeked in. It was here that Yankee kept 
his wood, when he had any. A few sticks only could be seen by 
the observers. Richard hurried the team home, but they did not 
stop at the barn as usual, but went on to the bush at the back of 
the farm. Here a generous load of wood was piled on the sleighs 
and Harvey was sent back to Yankee Jones’s barn, and not 
empty handed. In the morning Yankee’s family discovered that 
they had good hard wood for the severe weather that followed. 
Richard Griffin had this habit of peeking into the woodsheds of 
poor people, in severe weather, or in cases of sickness. I strongly 
believe that these two men were peeking into more than an 
empty woodshed in these visits ; I believe they were peeking into 
Heaven. Many a bag of potatoes and of flour found their way 
into the kitchens of poor homes. When Richard and his son 
measured grain for sale they rounded the measure and then 
threw on a shovelful to make sure that there was a bushel. I 
heard a man of seventy years of age, still a resident of Smithville, 
speaking of Richard Griffin, say: ‘He was the finest man that 
ever lived in Smithville.’ ” 

The following is a brief extract from a newspaper obituary 
notice of Richard C. Griffin: “He was not only a leader in the 
church of his choice ; in the community his counsel was often 
sought after; and so high an opinion his neighbors had of him 
that during the greater part of his life, and until the infirmities 
of age prevented him, he held one or more public offices. He was 
many years a member of the school board, a county councillor, 
and for more than a quarter of a century a justice of the peace.” 




MEHITABLE (ACKARD) GRIFFIN, RICHARD GRIFFIN 
(See No. 148) 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



65 



8th GENERATION 

149 

Eliza Jane Griffin (7), daughter of Abraham and Hannah 
(Stocking) Griffin, was born in Dec., 1824; she married Rev. 
Joseph Hilts, who afterwards became a Methodist minister. They 
both died in Dundas a few years ago. When they married, the 
township of Erin, Wellington County, had recently been sur- 
veyed, and they were among its earliest settlers, having many of 
the adventures and all the hard work common to pioneers in the 
forest. Mr. Hilts was author of several books, and in one of 
them, entitled “Among the Forest Trees,” he tells of many of 
the difficulties and dangers encountered. Several children were 
born to them, but the present writer has not obtained any par- 
ticulars regarding them. 

160 

Harriet Waddell (7), daughter of Robert and Mary (Hill) 
Waddell, married, Oct. 12, 1852, William Patterson; died March 
12, 1885. 

CHILDREN: 

388 — Mary Elizabeth, died in infancy. 

389 — John Waddell, married Mary Waddell. Had four 
children. 

390 — Rolland Clark, married Jane R. Cobb. 

391 — William FitzHugh. 

163 

Danford Griffin (7), son of Smith (6) and Betsy (Edmunds) 
Griffin, was born in Smithville, Ont., in or about 1824. He mar- 



66 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



ried Mary Smith, only daughter of John and Deborah (Wardell) 
Smith and granddaughter of Isaac and Mary (Griffin) "Wardell, 
his second cousin. They made their home in Erin township, 
where they were brought up and where they died. They had a 
family of eight children, 

CHILDREN: 

392 — Eliza, b. in Erin; m. John Kenny; lives in Michigan. 

393 — John, b. in Erin. 

394 — Catharine, b. in Erin; m. Geo. Carhiff; lives in Wash- 
ington. 

395 — William, b. in Erin; a farmer; m. Tillie Sheldson ; lives 
in Essex. 

396 — Deborah, b. in Erin. 

397 — Alfred, b. in Erin ; a farmer ; m. Louisa Sheldson ; lives 
in Leamington. 

398 — Jacob, b. in Erin; died in Michigan in 1920. 

399 — Harriet, b. in Erin; died in Essex. 



170 

William Murray Griffin (7), son of Smith (8) and Betsy 
(Edmunds) Griffin, born in 1837 ; married (first) Jane Proctor, 
and resided on and worked his farm in Erin township until 1901, 
when he removed to Erin village. His second son, Smith Edward 
Griffin, occupies the old homestead. He had six children, all by 
his first wife. 



CHILDREN: 

400 — George H., a merchant in Erin; m. Ella Burt, May 7, 
1883. 

401 — Olive Alicia, married James Syder, March 7, 1872. 

402 — Amanda Mellissa, married Robert Sprowl. 

403 — Clara Celista, married Elisha Lane. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



67 



404 — Smith Edward, married Marilla Swackhamer, Dec. 27, 
1894. 

405 — Nellie Victoria, married James Sprowl, March 1, 1895. 

His first wife having died, William Murray Griffin married 
(second) Susan Lawrence. 



173 

Isaac Smith Griffin (7), eldest son of Isaac and 

(Disher) Griffin. He died in 1883 or 1884. No other particulars 
have been learned regarding him. 

CHILDREN : 

406 — Albert B., b. in Smithville, Aug. 20, 1854. 

407 — Eliza Jane, b. in Smithville, 1859. 

408 — John Wesley. 

409 — William Smith. 



179 

Harriet Augusta Griffin (7), daughter of Jacob and Annie 
Griffin, born May 1, 1858 ; married John D. Coon, August 22, 
1877, at Caistor, Ont. She died Nov. 13, 1907. 

CHILDREN: 

410— Mabel, b. June 22, 1878; d. Feb. 1, 1880. 

411 — Ethel May, b. Sept. 7, 1879; m. Thomas E. Stone, July 
2, 1900. 

412 — Marcus Melgrove, b. Aug. 11, 1882; m. Ethel Steer, 
Jan. 1, 1907. 

413 — Jennie, b. June 26, 1884; d. Dec. 13, 1885. 

414 — Hattie Maybella, b. June 29, 1889 ; m. Fred. C. Donovan, 
Nov. 4, 1908. 

415 — Ona Marguerita, b. June 23, 1894; d. Aug. 27, 1894. 



68 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



181 

W. Nelson Griffin (7), son of Jonathan Wesley and Mary E. 
(Hurst) Griffin, was born at Canboro, Ont., Nov. 7, 1849. He 
married Regenna Smith. 

CHILD: 

416 — Lome, b. March 31, 1881, at Winona. 

183 

James Edward Griffin (7), youngest son of Morrel and Mar- 
garet (Hurst) Griffin, was born June 30, 1850. On September 
13, 1871, he married Mary Ann Early; she died February 20, 
1922, in her 74th year. The following obituary is from the Dunn- 
ville paper: 

“Death, which ended Mrs. Mary Griffin’s long invalidism, 
took from Dunnville one of its best-beloved citizens last Monday. 
Mellowed by three score years and fourteen, which were un- 
spoiled even by ten years as an invalid, her life made it a pleasure 
to know her. Mrs. Griffin had a large circle of friends and ac- 
quaintances in Dunnville, Grimsby and the Niagara District. 
She was a member of the Methodist Church. She is survived by 
her husband, James E. Griffin. Just last year the couple cele- 
brated their Golden wedding.” 

James E. Griffin has been a Methodist since boyhood; was 
trustee and member of the Quarterly Official Board of that 
church for 52 years, and for a number of years on the church 
finance committee. He was in the mercantile business in Dunn- 
ville, also in Grimsby. He now resides in the city of Niagara 
Falls, Ont. 

CHILD: 

417 — Ellis Eugene, b. Dec., 1872; died July 16, 1896. 

A Dunnville paper in announcing the death of Ellis E. 
Griffin made the following remarks: 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



69 



“He bore his illness and suffering with the patience and 
fortitude which is characteristic of the true Christian which he 
was. His funeral took place on Sunday afternoon and was one 
of the largest which has ever taken place in this town. Deceased 
was a devoted member of the Methodist Church, having been 
allied to it from his early childhood, and always lent a helping 
hand to any movement which had for its object the spread of 
the kingdom of Christ. ... . For some time past he had 

been engaged in the grocery business with his father, and 
through his obliging and upright dealing had won himself many 
warm friends.’ ’ 

195 

William Ryerson Griffin (7), son of Nathaniel and Sarah 
(Adams) Griffin, born March 30, 1827; married Sept. 27, 1851, to 
Almira Smith. They lived several years in Waterdown, Ont., 
and later settled in Staffordville, Ont., where he was living in 
1890. 

CHILDREN: 

418 — Alonzo Franklin, b. March 25, 1852 ; d. Sept. 22, 1864. 

419 — Louisa Jane, b. April 2, 1854; m. Levi Hatch, Nov. 23, 
1871. 

420— Matilda, b. Feb. 4, 1857. 

421 — William Henry, b. July 14, 1859 ; m. Maggie Celista 
Cams, Nov. 10, 1883. 

196 

Thomas I. Griffin (7), son of Nathaniel and Sarah (Adams) 
Griffin, born July 16, 1829; married March 6, 1854, Miss Alice 
Atkinson, who was born March 22, 1833, and died Dec. 19, 1888. 

CHILDREN: 

422 — Ransom L., born Jan. 6, 1855; m. Minnie K. Brooks, 
Sept. 28, 1882. 



70 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



423 — Sardenia E., b. Sept. 20, 1856 ; m. Geo. T. Bartlett, June 
11, 1879. 

424 — Lorenzo D., b. May 13, 1858. 

425— John A., b. Feb. 9, I860; d. May 12, 1862. 

426— Stella L., b. May 24, 1872. 

Thomas I. Griffin married (second) Mrs. Jane B. Ross, March 
10, 1890, and at that time was living in Port Hope, Huron Co., 
Mich. 

207 

Burwell Griffin (7), son of Solomon and Mary (Teeple) 
Griffin, born May 10, 1828 ; married Miss Delilah Binkley. He 
was a farmer, a Methodist, and a good citizen. He died on the 
farm where he spent most of his life. 

CHILDREN: 

427 — Abram Binkley, b. April 8, 1854 ; m. Ada Davidson. 

428 — Wellington S., b. March 23, 1856; m. Kate Newel. 

429 — Florence E., b. April 30, 1858; m. John W. Rymal. 

430 — William O., died in infancy. 

431 — Peter F., b. April 8, 1862; m. Clara Dawes. 

432 — Arthur C., b. March 16, 1864; m. Brittania Featherston. 

433 — John W., b. April 22, 1866; m. Annie Buttrum. 

434 — Burwell, b. April 22, 1869 ; m. Allie Robertson. 

435 — George, died in infancy. 

436 — Robert C., b. Feb. 9, 1873 ; m. Aggie Colyer. 

437 — Mary, b. Feb. 9, 1873; died young. 

438 — Fred, died in infancy. 

439 — Mabel E. Griffin, b. July 18, 1877 ; m. Orley B. Griffin. 

440— Delilah, b. July 4, 1880; m. Thos. Ballentine. 

441 — Alma, b. Jan. 30, 1884; m. Ernest VanDusen. 

208 

Sarah Griffin (7), daughter of Solomon and Mary (Teeple) 
Griffin, born in 1831 ; married Sept. 13, 1849, Rev. Robert C. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



71 



Parsons, Methodist clergyman. They both lived to advanced age 
and died in St. Thomas, Ont. 

CHILDREN : 

442 — Mary, m. Wilbur Smith ; removed to California. 

443 — Catharine, m. Rev. Robert L. Warner, D. D., Principal 
of Alma College, St. Thomas, Ont. 

209 

Catharine Griffin (7), daughter of Solomon and Mary 
(Teeple) Griffin; married Abram Ryckman. 

CHILDREN : 

444 — Solomon. 

445 — John. 

446 — Mary A. 

447— Bnrwell Griffin, b. in 1863 ; d. May 10, 1922. 

448 — Martha. 



210 

Bridget Ann Griffin (7), daughter of Solomon and Mary 
(Teeple) Griffin, born at Waterdown, Ont,; married Oct. 31, 
1854, William Teetzel. She died in Toronto, Ont., in 1921. 

CHILDREN: 

449 — Mary Catharine, b. Aug. 14, 1855; m. Henry Clarke, 
Oct. 16, 1878. 

450— Burwell Edgar, b. May 17, 1857. 

451 — William Franklin, b. July 25, 1859; m. Juliana B. 
Cooke, Nov. 15, 1905 ; they have two children. 

452— Charles Wesley, b. July 12, 1863. 

453 — Ida Josephine, b. July 20, 1866. 



2 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



232 

Cyrus Smith Griffin (7), son of Smith C. and Eliza Griffin, 
b. Sept. 16, 1849 ; married Miss Galloway. 

CHILD : 

454— Albert, b. in 1881. 



238 

Caroline Amelia (7), eldest daughter of William Henry and 
Mary (Sykes) Griffin, b. Feb. 22, 1843; married Reid Weaver, of 
Ancaster, Feb. 28, 1861. Now living in Hamilton. 

CHILDREN: 

455— Alberta, b. Aug. 13, 1863. 

456 — Zenas, b. March 14, 1865 ; d. 1867. 

457 — Nina Ada, b. July, 1867 ; d. 1867. 

458 — Harry Griffin, b. Feb. 18, 1868 ; d. in 1868. 

459 — Orton, b. May 25, 1869 ; d. July, 1890. 

460 — Charles Lindsay, b. Jan. 18, 1872; d. Oct., 1875. 

461 — Zoe, b. March 9, 1874; cl. Oct., 1875. 

462 — Linwood Crawford, b. Aug. 18, 1876. 

463 — Norma Elizabeth, b. May 22, 1879; d. 1890. 

464 — Zaida Claire, b. Nov. 9, 1882; m. 1907, a physician, of 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

239 

Serina Matilda Griffin (7), daughter of William Henry and 
Mary (Sykes) Griffin, b. Feb. 23, 1845; married Sept., 1875, Geo. 
Darrow, of Tilsonburg. He died Feb., 1897, and she died June, 
1914. 

CHILD: 

465— William Arthur, b. Dec. 4, 1872. 




FREDERICK T. GRIFFIN 

(See No. 472) 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



73 



245 

Minnie Brant Griffin (7), daughter of William Henry and 
Mary (Sykes) Griffin, born July 27, 1859; married William J. 
Nichol, of Toronto. 

'CHILDREN: 

466 — Frederick, b. April, I860. 

467 — Sidney, b. Jan., 1886. 

249 

James Kent Griffin (7), eldest son of Ebenezer and Eliza 
(Kent) Griffin, born at Waterdown, Ont., Feb. 16, 1823; married 
Almira Dyke, daughter of Thomas Dyke, of Hamilton, Ont., in 
July, 1845. He was educated at Victoria College for the ministry, 
but taught school for a time and then devoted his life to in- 
dustrial pursuits, though he always took an active part in 
religious and temperance work, and was noted as a Bible class 
teacher. For many years he carried on business as a contractor, 
building roads, houses, etc. One macadamized road he built 
from Waterdown through the forest to Hamilton, in 1854 and 
1855, and northward to Carlisle at alater date, is, and has been 
for many years, the principal thoroughfare between the three 
places. It is frequently called the Griffin Road. Being of an 
inventive mind he spent much of his time devising and improv- 
ing various machines. The most successful of his inventions 
is the Griffin Mill for grinding soft ore, which is extensively 
used throughout the United States and elsewhere. He died in 
eattle, Washington, U. S. A., Sept. 21, 1910. His wife died at 
Galt, Ont., January, 1898. 

CHILDREN: 

468 — Caroline Augusta, b. May 30, 1846; d. March 30, 1908. 

469— Edwin Culver, b. Jan. 29, 1848 ; d. Dec. 10, 1911. 

470 — Josephine Maria, b. Oct. 19, 1849; d. Dec. 24, 1875. 



74 



A PIONEEE FAMILY 



471 — Wilhelmina Ellis, b. Oct. 8, 1851. 

472 — Frederick Thomas, b. Oct. 29, 1853. 

473 — Albert Dyke, b. Dec. 14, 1855. 

474 — Arthur Kent, b. Nov. 11, 1858. 

475 — Alice Eleanor, b. Dec. 23, 1860. 

476— Edith Adelaide, b. Sept. 20, 1863. 

477 — James Percival, b. Jan., 1867; m. Oct. 9, 1890, Rose 
Lillian Pratt, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

478— Helen Mabel, b. June 9, 1871 ; d. July 7, 1899. 

250 

George Douglas Griffin (7), son of Ebenezer and Eliza (Kent) 
Griffin, born at Waterdown, Aug. 12, 1824; married May 29, 
1845, Cynthia Ann Williams, born February 13, 1826, daughter 
of Justus Wright Williams, J. P., of Oakville, Ont., and grand- 
daughter of Capt. John Aikman, of Hamilton, Ont., U. E. L. 
George D. Griffin served an apprenticeship to the woollen cloth 
manufacture in the factory of his father at Waterdown, Ont., 
and on attaining his majority, in 1845, became a partner and the 
manager. In 1850 the factory was burned and he became inter- 
ested in other lines of business and travelled extensively in all 
the old provinces of Canada, having visited nearly every town 
and village in the Province of Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, New 
Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, and from frequent visits 
to them was like a gazetteer for knowledge of them, perhaps 
better. He was Secretary of the Mechanics’ Institute of Water- 
down in the years 1845, 1846, 1855 and 1856. The minute book 
of the Institute for years 1843 to 1870 is in the possession of the 
Wentworth Historical Society, and the minutes by Mr. Griffin are 
all very clear and neat. The Hon. Adam Ferguson was Presi- 
dent during part of the time when Mr. Griffin was Secretary. 
Being of a literary turn, Mr. Griffin contributed many articles 
for the press and was publisher of several periodicals, among 
these was probably the first illustrated temperance paper in Can- 
ada, an eight-page monthly called “The Herald of Truth,” which, 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



75 



though well edited and well printed, like most temperance and 
many other papers, had a very short existence ; it was published 
in 1860. He also published a magazine called “The Canadian 
Quarterly Review,’’ partly literary and partly devoted to nation- 
al politics; it was fairly successful and continued for several 
years, but the last number was printed in 1866. Having an in- 
timate acquaintance with the resources and the industrial affairs 
of Canada, he was an ardent advocate of protection for home 
manufactures and industries. In some sections he was long 
known as the “father of protection.” He continued till the end 
of his life to contribute to the press articles on this subject. 
Possessing strong religious convictions, he was always active in 
church, Sunday-school and temperance work. He died in Park- 
dale, Toronto, Ont., March 14, 1911, and the daily papers of 
Hamilton and Toronto, in their editorial columns, spoke very 
highly of him. Mrs. Griffin died Oct. 25, 1921, at the age of 95 
years, 8 months and 12 days, retaining all her faculties to the 
end. 

CHILDREN: 

479 — Justus Alonzo Griffin, b. June 6, 1846. 

480 — Anne Eliza, b. May 24, 1848; died in infancy. 

481 — Horatio Milford, b. April 10, 1849. 

482 — Emma Aletta, b. June 12, 1853; d. Dec. 12, 1900. 

483 — Charles Henry, b. Jan. 24, 1856; d. Jan. 31, 1889. 

484— Ida Emily, b. Sept. 22, 1858. 

485 — Watson, b. Nov. 4, 1860. 

486 — George Alexander, b. June 1, 1863. 

487 — John Williams, b. Oct. 8, 1865 ; d. May 22, 1885. 

488— Chester Ernest, b. July 20, 1868 ; d. March 10, 1872. 

489 — Alvin Douglas, b. Sept. 18, 1871. 

Extract from the Hamilton Daily Spectator, March 15, 1911 : 

A GREAT 'MAN GONE. 

“A notable Canadian passed out, when death set its seal upon 
the lips of George D. Griffin, of Toronto, yesterday. Born in the 



76 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



village of Waterdown, of United Empire Loyalist stock, this man 
had lived eighty-seven years a British-Canadian. He has been 
called Canada’s veteran protectionist, and the term is by no 
means misapplied. For more than fifty years this keen intellect 
has made itself felt all over the Dominion in the battle of Canada 
for the Canadians. It was in 1855 that, as an extensive flour and 
woolen mill operator in his native village, feeling the depressing 
effect of the then reciprocity trade pact with the United States, 
he began his protectionist campaign through the columns of the 
Spectator. Since that time his protectionist faith never faltered, 
nor did his zeal for the cause at any time lag. Only a few days 
ago, what was possibly Mr. Griffin’s last important article on 
this subject, published in the Canadian Century Magazine, was 
reproduced in the Spectator— the paper whose columns, in 1855, 
contained his first writings. 

“George D. Griffin, son of a U. E. Loyalist, was nurtured in 
the loyalist faith. He knew from the experience of his parents, 
as well as by the spirit born within him, the true meaning of the 
term, loyalty. 

“We could wish that such men might remain with us always, 
but it cannot be so. The inexorable law of nature gives us our 
limit for earth activity, and then the passing.” 



251 

William Smith Griffin, D. D. (7), son of Ebenezer and Eliza 
(Kent) Griffin, was born at Waterdown, Ont., Oct. 10, 1826, and 
died in Toronto, Ont., Oct. 17, 1917. He married (first) Margaret 
Spohn, daughter of Philip Spohn, Esq., of Ancaster, June 28, 
1853. 

CHILDREN: 

490 — Herbert Spohn, b. July 11, 1854; d. June 28, 1921. 

491 — William, b. Nov. 19, 1855; drowned in Toronto Bay, 
in 1878. 



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77 



Mrs. Margaret Griffin died Nov. 16, 1856. W. S. Griffin mar- 
ried (second) Miss Hannah Bigger. 

CHILDREN : 

492 — A daughter who died in infancy. 

493 — Margaret, b. June 12, 1860. 

William Smith Griffin was a clergyman of the Methodist 
Church, and for 70 years was active in its service, having been 
stationed in many of the large towns and cities, including Ham- 
ilton and Toronto. He was twice President of Conference and 
several times Secretary. In their annual gatherings he was al- 
ways a prominent figure, and by his good judgment and genial 
wit wielded a great influence. For many years he was Treasurer 
of the Superannuation Fund of the Church, an office he held till 
his death in his 92nd year. Mrs. Hannah Griffin died March 15, 
1918, aged 86 years. 

Extract from Hamilton Spectator, Oct. 15, 1917 : 

Following an illness of but a few days, the death took place 
in Toronto, on Saturday evening, Oct. 13, of Rev. Dr. W. S. 
Griffin, one of the best known and most widely esteemed ministers 
of the Methodist church in Canada, and an outstanding figure in 
the work of the church for nearly three-quarters of a century. 
On Tuesday last he celebrated the ninety-second anniversary of 
his birth, but in spite of his advanced age he was vigorous of both 
mind and body, and was at his desk daily in the office of the 
superannuation fund of the church until a few days ago, and was 
bright to the close of his long and busy life. Half a century ago 
he was perhaps the most able and vigorous minister of the con- 
nexion in the province, and he had a reputation as a preacher of 
the outspoken, witty typpe that lasted down to a decade ago. 
There are hundreds in Ontario wa can recall the mellow tones 
and deep conviction under the waggishness that was “in the 
sound of the voice that is still.” 



78 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



For the last twenty-five years Dr. Griffin had been treasurer 
of the superannuation fund, church and parsonage and general 
conference funds, but latterly much of the work wwas only nomin- 
ally his. He, however, retained a bright intelligence and interest 
in the work of the denomination to the very last day. 

The late Dr. Griffin was born in Waterdown, and after 
preaching in the circuit for some time was ordained at the Ham- 
ilton conference in 1849. He was the last surviving member of 
that conference. He recently recounted that his first salary was 
$70 a year, and that his horse for the district he served cost him 
$100. He was much in demand in the pulpits of the Niagara 
peninsula, where his jocular manner was often a great draw to 
any special gathering. He subsequently held charges at Hamil- 
ton (First Church), Chatham, St. Catharines, Guelph, Stratford, 
Brantford, and was pastor of Elm Street Methodist Church, Tor- 
onto, forty years ago. His business abilities were undoubted. 
He had gone to the Episcopal church of the United States as 
Canadian representative, and had once visited England, but in a 
private capacity. 

In Centenary Church last night the pastor, Rev. Dr. Sparl- 
ing, said that the late Dr. Griffin had, without a doubt, the most 
remarkable career of any minister in the Methodist church, and, 
he believed, of any other religious body. The deceased had 
served his Master in the ministry for over 70 years, dying in 
harness at the age of 92. 



252 

Egerton Ryerson Griffin, M.D. (7), son of Ebenezer and Eliza 
(Kent) Griffin, was born in Waterdown, Ont., March 17, 1829; 
died Aug. 9, 1897. He studied medicine at Victoria College 
Medical School, and after a term in New York hospitals settled 
in Brantford, Ont., and remained there in the practice of his pro- 
fession. He married Georgina Smith, daughter of A. K. Smith, 
Esq. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



79 



CHILD: 

494 — Mary. She married (first) Dr. Harris, a grandson of 
Col. John Butler, of Butler’s Rangers. Dr. Harris was surgeon 
of the 38th Dufferin Rifles. He died Aug. 29, 1896. She married 
(second) Lt.-Col. Harry Leonard, of the 2nd Dragoons. No chil- 
dren. 



253 

Eleanor Rebecca (7), eldest daughter of Ebenezer and Eliza 
(Kent) Griffin, b. June 1, 1831, at Waterdown. Married John E. 
Nellis, of Burford. After residing in several places in Canada 
they removed to Michigan and settled at Mount Clemens, where 
Mr. Nellis and his son carried on a newspaper. He was also 
customs collector at that port for many years. He died in Feb., 
1904. Mrs. Eleanor R. Nellis is still living in Mount Clemens. 

CHILDREN: 

495 — Georgiana Louise, b. in Province of Ontario Dec. 7, 1855. 

496 — Frank E., b. in Waterdown, Ont., March 27, 1857. 

497 — Jessie, b. in Ontario, Canada, Feb. 20, 1861. 

498 — Nellie, b. in Ontario, Canada, Oct. 17, 1862. 

499 — Grace, b. in Michigan, Jan. 11, 1874. 

254 

Franklin Metcalf (7), son of Ebenezer and Eliza (Kent) 
Griffin, born in Waterdown June 10, 1833. When a very young 
man he acted as purser on a steamer on Lake Michigan and as 
clerk in a lumber camp. On his return he was in mercantile busi- 
ness in Waterdown, then studied law, and on being called to the 
bar practiced his profession in Brantford, where he died June 4 , 
1877. He married Margaret Davidson. 

CHILD: 

500 — Zaidee; now (1924) residing in New York City, where 
she is chief librarian of the Webster Library. 



80 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



255 

Watson Ebenezer (7), son of Ebenezer and Eliza (Kent) 
Griffin, born at Waterdown in 1835 ; died in New York about eight 
years ago. After some experience in business in Waterdown he 
went fo California in 1859, and had there a varied experience as 
trader and as farmer; among other things he lost all he had in 
one of the Sacramento Valley floods. He finally settled in Eureka, 
Nevada, where he carried on a banking business. In 1857 he 
married Malvina Dudley, of Simcoe. 

CHILD: 

501 — Nellie; twice married. No children. 

258 

Eliza Augusta (7), daughter of Ebenezer and Eliza (Kent) 
Griffin, born June 1, 1842; married Wesley Spohn, of Ancaster, 
in Sept., 1865. They resided on their farm in Ancaster Town- 
ship till 1913, when they retired from active work and moved to 
Hamilton. 

CHILDREN: 

502 — Harry, b. Sept. 19, 1867; m. Jan. 1, 1895, Miss Millie 
Shaw. 

503— Nellie, b. Nov. 30, 1870; m. May 7, 1896, W. M. Mc- 
Clemont, barrister, Hamilton, Ont. 

259 

Henry Augustus (7), youngest son of Ebenezer and Eliza 
(Kent) Griffin, was bom in Waterdown, Ont., April 10, 1844. He 
died in Cleveland, Ohio, July 17, 1904. Was educated in the 
public and grammar schools of Waterdown and Hamilton. In 
1864 he served four months in a volunteer militia battalion on 
the Niagara frontier. In 1865 he removed to Wyandotte, Mich., 
where he was employed for a time in a mercantile business; 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



81 



afterwards carried on a weekly paper in that town. He later 
was department editor on a Detroit paper, and still later edited 
the “Cleveland Leader” several years. He was also managing 
editor of a daily paper in Buffalo for some time. In 1891 and 
1892 he was Secretary to the Board of Control of the City of 
Cleveland, and on Feb. 28, 1893, was appointed Director of Police 
of that city. In April, 1894, he became Secretary of the Ohio 
Board of Commerce. At the time of his death he was president 
of a bank. He married, May 24, 1867, Mary Imogene DeKalb. 

(CHILDREN : 

504 — Mary Agnes, b. Jan. 11, 1870. 

505 — A son who died young. 

The following is from the “Cleveland Leader” of July 17, 
1904: 

“Cleveland can ill afford to lose men like the late Henry A. 
Griffin. He was not only a good citizen but one who could not 
rest content without doing his full part to make the big center 
of business and population in which he lived a good city. Mr. 
Griffin was not so fond of his own ease or leisure that he let 
personal comfort interfere with public duty. He was actuated 
by a most wholesome and helpful impatience of folly and wrong 
in civic affairs, and he never shirked the fullest obligations of 
his intelligence, his energy, and his appreciation of what was 
best for the general welfare. In home life and church relations, 
in business and in both the wider and the more intimate inter- 
ests of society, he set a fine example of devotion to his ideals and 
to the obligations of good citizenship.” 

264 

Martha Ann Griffin (7), daughter of Absalom and Harriet 
(Smith) Griffin, born in Waterdown, Ont., in 1833; married 
Elijah Freeman in or about 1853. He died Nov. 25, 190.0, aged 
77 years; and Mrs. Freeman died five days later, Nov. 30, 1900, 

6 



82 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



CHILDREN : 

506 — Emma, married a Mr. Sutton, of Brantford. 

507 — Ransom, married Miss Taylor. 

508 — Fannie, married Nathaniel Bell, a civil engineer, and 
son of Dr. Bell. They reside in Toronto, Ont. 

267 

Elizabeth Olivia Griffin (7), daughter of Henry and Rachael 
(Eastman) Griffin, born in Grimsby, Ont., Dec. 14, 1833, presided 
over her father’s house after her mother’s death, and still oc- 
cupies the homestead in Grand Haven, Mich., now being in her 
91st year. The following appreciative notice is condensed from 
the “Grand Haven Tribune” of Dec. 13, 1923: 

“Miss Elizabeth Griffin, beloved by her many old friends 
in Grand Haven, will observe the 90th anniversary of her birth 
tomorrow. In her home, surrounded by her many precious mem- 
ories of days which are past, the event will be quietly observed 
tomorrow, and there are many dear friends who are aware of 
the day and who will extend their congratulations and express 
their genuine love for Miss Griffin. 

“Miss Griffin is one of the pioneer residents of Grand Haven. 
Her memory goes back to the very beginnings of Grand Haven 
as a permanent settlement, and she preserves many pleasant 
recollections of those early days. 

“Miss Griffin is a sweet and gentle little lady, whose love 
and interest centers about her home and her friends, old and new. 
She reads and works without glasses in spite of her years and 
her mentality and her spirit are unimpaired with the advance of 
time. 

“The love and good wishes, not only of her personal friends, 
but of the whole city, are with Miss Elizabeth Griffin as she 
approaches the 90th milestone in her life.” 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



83 



269 

Rachael Eleanor Griffin (7), daughter of Henry and Rachael 
(Eastman) Griffin, was born in Grand Haven, Mich., Sept. 8, 1850. 
She married De Forest McNett, of Sodus Point, N. Y., Feb., 1892. 
Previous to her marriage she had some very romantic and inter- 
esting experiences. After completing her education at Vassar 
College, where she was a classmate of the lady who became the 
wife of Mark Twain, she taught a government Indian school in 
Arizona, and had a narrow escape when the Apache Indians 
went on the war path. The commandant of the post sent a 
cavalry detachment to escort her to a place of safety in a more 
civilized part of the country. Since the death of her husband 
she has made her home with her sister in Grand Haven. She is 
a trained Red Cross Executive Secretary with a diploma en- 
titling her to do the work anywhere in the United States or her 
possessions. She now has the City of Grand Haven and nine 
townships in her jurisdiction. She has also been appointed wel- 
fare officer of the American Legion. These positions very fully 
occupy her time. Her office hours are 9 :30 a.m. to 12 m., and 7 to 
8 p. m. She says: “I consider the Red Cross work the most im- 
portant interest in my life. ’ ? 



271 

Maria Griffin (7), daughter of Alanson and Julia (Ellice) 
Griffin, born in 1847 ; married Robert M. Wilson, June 7, 1873. 

CHILDREN: 

509— Irvine H. C., b. Oct. 18, 1874. 

510 — Robert C. H., b. Jan. 26, 1877 ; died in infancy. 

511 — Amy. 

Maria (Griffin) Wilson married (second) Mr. Sykes. She 
died in Toronto, 1921. 



84 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



273 

Harriet Sarah Griffin (7), daughter of Sutherland D. and 
Martha (Leonard) Griffin, born May 19, 1850; married George 
Vidal Salter, son of an Anglican clergyman, Aug. 6, 1875. 

'CHILDREN: 

512 — George Leonard, b. Sept. 16, 1876; m. Mary Louise 
Mawhinney, Nov. 17, 1909. 

513 — Eva Maria, b. Nov. 25, 1877; m. Arthur Paekham; no 
issue. Address, Bowsman, Man. 

514 — Emma Louise, b. Sept. 26, 1879. Not married. Is a 
school teacher in Winnipeg, Man. 

515 — John Sutherland, b. Nov. 21, 1881 ; m. Isabella Munro, 
Oct., 1908. 

516 — Walter Frederick, b. 15 March, 1884; m. Roberta Tait, 
Sept., 1908. 

517 — Raymond Emeric, b. March 27, 1887 ; m. Carrie Fuller. 

518 — Richard Augustus, b. April 22, 1892. Bowsman, Man. 

Mrs. Harriet S. (Griffin) Salter died April 26, 1899. 



274 

Walter H. Griffin (7), son of Sutherland D. and Martha 
(Leonard) Griffin, was born at Brantford, Oct. 31, 1852. When 
a young man he became a “ pioneer of the west” and located in 
Montana. He became 1 a resident of Kalispell, Montana, in a 
beautiful valley of the Rocky Mountains, where he engaged in 
the insurance business. He died in Kalispell, Sunday, Jan. 27th, 
1924. He never married. 

The following is from the Brantford Expositor, Jan. 28, 1924: 

‘ ‘Mr. Colborne N. Griffin and Lt.-Col. H. Leonard received 
word this morning that Mr. Walter H. Griffin passed peacefully 
away on Sunday at Kalispell, Montana. 

“The deceased, who was 71 years old, will be well remem- 
bered by the old time residents of the city. He used to be at the 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



85 



head of the Dominion Telegraph office here and was well known 
and generally esteemed for his buoyant and happy disposition. 
Mr. Griffin was prominently identified with the early telephone 
experiments and took part in the first transmission of the human 
voice between Brantford and Paris. The late Dr. Alexander 
Graham Bell, in speaking at the unveiling of the Bell Memorial 
in 1917, said in this regard : 

“ ‘The transmitting instrument was placed in Brantford, 
the receiving instrument in Paris, and the batteries used were in 
Toronto, so that made a pretty long circuit. I was in Paris at 
the receiving end, listening. Mr. W. H. Griffin, who I am glad to 
know is still alive and with us to-day, was in charge of the Dom- 
inion Telegraph office in Brantford at the transmitting instru- 
ment, and sounds were received in Paris. Those were the first 
experiments in the world in which sounds were received at a dis- 
tance of many miles. ’ ’ ’ 

“Mr. Griffin left for the States many years ago and was 
mayor of Kalispell many times. He was never married and leaves 
two brothers to mourn his loss, Frank and Robert, who both re- 
side in South Dakota.” 

275 

Francis Leonard Griffin (7), son of Sutherland D. and Martha 
(Leonard) Griffin, born at Brantford, Ont., Feb. 28, 1854. When 
he returned from his adventurous journey to the antipodes, he 
followed his father to South Dakota and located a homestead near 
him, at Thomas, Hamlin County, where he is a prosperous farmer. 
Not married. 

276 

Robert W. Griffin (7), son of Sutherland D. and Martha 
(Leonard) Griffin, born at Brantford, Ont,, March 31, 1856. As 
related on a previous page, he accompanied his brother Francis 
in a voyage to New Zealand, and with him saw active military 



86 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



service in the Zulu war. In 1881 he settled in Thomas, Hamlin 
Co., South Dakota. He is a wealthy farmer, president of the 
Farmers’ State Bank and secretary of the Thomas Farmers’ Ele- 
vator Company. He married, March 15, 1891, Hulda Sprockoff. 

CHILDREN: 

519 — Walter H., b. Jan. 8, 1892. 

520— Arthur F., b. Aug. 13, 1893 

521 — Grace H., b. Dec. 1, 1897 ; married Lloyd E. Rose, Oct. 
1, 1917. 

522— Howard E., b. Sept. 20, 1900. 



278 

Colborne Nellis (7), son of Cyrus R. and Mary (Nellis) 
Griffin, born at Brantford, Jan. 9, 1850; married Dec. 26, 1887, to 
Mary Margaret Burt, a grand-daughter of a distinguished Ameri- 
can chemist of Sackett’s Harbor, N. Y. They are now living in 
Brantford, Ont. 

CHILDREN: 

523 — Georgia Burt, b. Sept. 25, 1891. 

524— Edna Alice, b. May 17, 1894. 

525 — Cyrus Stanley, b. Feb. 19, 1896. 



281 

Harriet A. (7), daughter of Cyrus R. and Mary (Nellis) 
Griffin, born at Brantford, Ont., Aug. 26, 1858; married Nov., 
1883, J. H. Simmons. 

CHILD: 

526— Ariel, b. Oct., 1884. 

Harriet A. (Griffin) Simmons died Oct. 17, 1884. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



87 



286 

Marian Griffin (7), daughter of Samuel S. and Catharine 
(Finegin) Griffin, born Sept. 11, 1856, at Melbourne, Australia; 
married Charles Hastings-Bridge, C E., of Christchurch, New 
Zealand, on April 14, 1880. 

CHILDREN: 

527 — Arthur, b. at Leestore, Canterbury, N. Z., Aug. 21, 1881. 

528 — Isabel Frances, b. Oct. 12, 1886. 

529 — Margaret, b. 1891. 

287 

Edmund Alvin (7), son of Samuel S. and Catharine (Fine- 
gin) Griffin, born at Castlemaine, Victoria, Australia, Sept. 27, 
1860; married Jessie Tapp, Aug. 10, 1881. 

iCHILDREN: 

530 — Ruby Catharine, b. at Timaru, N. Z., May 21, 1882. 

531 — Harold Alvin, b. at Timaru, N. Z., March 7, 1884; d. 
March 8, 1884. 

532 — Esther Maude, b. at Timaru, N. Z., June 21, 1885. 

533 — Ethel Rualine, b. at Christchurch, N. Z., Sept. 12, 1887. 

534 — Royden Trevor Whitney, b. April 20, 1889. 

297 

Jacob Anson Griffin (7), eldest son of Abraham Culp and 
Charity (Smuck) Griffin, born March 17, 1828, near Waterdown; 
died March 15, 1885. He married (first) Marilla Ann Dal- 
ton, of Smithville, Ont., March 10, 1857 ; no children. She died 
April 8, 1860. He married (second) Mary Ann Walker, who 
was born in 1830; they were married Oct. 20, 1860. She died 
July 4, 1871. 

CHILD: 

535 — Ira Stuart, b. in 1863, at Smithville, Ont. 



88 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



298 

James Nelson Griffin (7), second son of Abraham C. and 
Charity (Smuck) Griffin, b. Oct. 20, 1830; married (first) 
Susan Matilda Gould, Feb. 7, 1855. 

CHILDREN : 

536 — Curtis James, b. Jan. 11, 1856; d. June 28, 1857. 

537 — Ransom Merritt, b. Aug. 29, 1859. 

Mrs. Susan M. Griffin died Feb. 11, 1872. James N. Griffin 
married (second) Eleanor Jane Roszel, daughter of Charles 
Roszel, of Grimsby, Ont. She was bora Dec. 12, 1849; married 
Dec. 25, 1872. 

CHILDREN: 

538 — Mary Margarita, b. Jan. 4, 1874; m. John Smuck, of 
Waterdown. 

539 — Orley Burgess, b. March 3, 1875 ; m. Mabel Griffin. 

540 — Aletta Victoria, b. April 3, 1877. 

541 — James Morey, b. Aug. 8, 1879; d. March 11, 1886. 

542 — Bertha May, b. March 13, 1881 ; d. 1894. 

543 — Alethea Eleanor, b. May 4, 1883. 

544 — Ethel Cora, b. March 1, 1887. 

545 — Charles Ernest, b. June 2, 1888. 

299 

George Erastus Griffin (7), son of Abraham C. and Charity 
(Smuck) Griffin, bora Feb. 15, 1833; married Lucinda Maria 
Davis, who was born June 13, 1838. 

CHILDREN: 

546 — George Lee, b. March 17, 1858. 

547 — William S., b. Jan. 27, 1860. 

548 — Charles Adelbert, b. April 24, 1862. 

549 — Arthur Egerton, b. Feb. 11, 1867. 

550 — David Harley, b. Aug. 25, 1871. 

551 — Maria Elena, b. Feb. 15, 1881. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



89 



300 

Mary Eleanor (7), daughter of Abraham C. and Charity 
(Smuck) Griffin, born May 27, 1835, at Smithville; married Mil- 
ton James Morse, son of Abisha A. Morse, Esq., of Smithville, 
Ont. They removed to Kansas. 

CHILDREN: 

552 — Enea Sarah, b. in Smithville. 

553 — James Harley, b. in Smithville. 

385 

Jane Griffin (7), daughter of Richard Collver and Mehitable 
(Ackard) Griffin, born at Smithville, July 7, 1840; married Jan. 
1, 1856, to Richard W. Cobb, of Pavilion, N. Y. He died April 
12, 1886. 

CHILDREN: 

554 — Alanson Lovell Griffin, b. April 20, 1857. 

555 — Jane Kentfield, b. Sept. 13, 1862; m. Rolland Clark 
Patterson. 



386 

James Harvey Griffin (7), only son of Richard Collver and 
Mehitable (Ackard) Griffin, was born at Smithville, Ont., Sept. 
5, 1842; died Dec. 25, 1917. He spent all his life on the farm 
where he was born, never married, and his nephews fell heir to 
the property. A genial, pleasant mannered and benevolent man, 
with a gift of humor, he was held in high esteem by his neighbors. 
After the death of his eldest sister, Priscilla, he lived alone in 
the old homestead several years, and not unnaturally became 
rather eccentric. The present writer called on him one autumn 
day in 1914 and asked: “Are you Mr. Griffin?” And receiving 
answer said: “My name is Griffin, too.” To which he drawlingly 



90 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



replied: “Th-a-t m-a-y b-e s-o.” Frequently during the conver- 
sation which followed he used the same expression, sometimes 
merely as an exclamation, but evidently it expressed in some 
cases a doubt. 

The ‘‘Story of Smithville” says much in commendation of 
James Harvey Griffin, commonly called “Harvey Dick,” and I 
make two selections therefrom: 

“Adjoining Harvey’s house was an orchard, in which grew 
strawberry Pippins, Seek-no-furthers, and the yellowest harvest 
apples I have ever seen. There was a huge black cherry tree 
in the orchard, the strength of whose every limb I have tested, 
and beyond the orchard was a hundred acre farm, dotted here 
and there with hickory trees, completes the picture. The old 
gentleman was a friend of all the'; small boys. A timid knock 
at the door and a polite request gave them access to the apples 
or cherries in their season, or all the hickory nuts they cared to 
gather. 

“One cold winter day a fire broke out in the dwelling of a 
poor family in the village. It was the home of an old couple, 
both past three score nad ten years. Attracted by the excitement 
of the fire, boy-like, I was present. The building was still burn- 
ing when I arrived, but I learned that James Harvey Griffin had 
been there already, with his team of sorrel colts which he always 
drove with halters and bits, and usually at a gallop. The colts 
were hitched to a big jumper sleigh, with a painted box and 
curved sides which made it resemble a huge old-fashioned cradle. 
Harvey usually sat in the bottom of this box, which was partly 
filled with straw, and called to his team, as they galloped on a 
tight rein, ‘Hip Julee,’ ‘Hip, Hip, Julee.’ He had brought his 
sympathy for this old couple wrapped up in a bag of flour, a 
ham and a load of wood: I have seen him leave the village store 
for home with a big bag of oranges and before he had reached 
the end of the street this bag was empty. He had met friends of 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



91 



his boyhood, he had met children, and the oranges that he in- 
tended to take home had faded away, but his smile had broadened 
and his eyes had a brighter twinkle. Dear, generous, kind- 
hearted old man ; he was the worthy son of a worthy sire . 9 9 



387 

Annie Elizabeth Griffin (7), daughter of Richard Collver 
and Mehitable (Ackard) Griffin, born Nov. 21, 1847, married 
James Alfred Patterson, of Smithville. 

CHILDREN: 

556 — James Richard, b. Aug. 23, 1880; m. Florence C. Joslin, 
April 27, 1918. 

557— John Harvey, b. Sept. 13, 1882. 

558 — Elizabeth P., b. Sept. 11, 1884. 



92 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



9th GENERATION 

404 

Smith Edward (8), son of William Murray and Eliza Jane 
(Proctor) Griffin, married Marilla Swackhamer, Dec. 27, 1894; 
he is a farmer, on the old homestead of his father. 

CHILD: 

559 — Harold Leslie, b. Oct. 1st, 1895; married June 27th, 
1923, to Jessie V. Reid. 



411 

Ethel May Coon (8), daughter of John D. and Harriet Au- 
gusta (Griffin) Coon, born Sept. 7, 1879; married Thomas E. 
Stone, July 2, 1900. She died Aug. 18, 1911. 

CHILDREN: 

560 — Gretchen, b. April 8, 1901. 

561— Beulah, b. May 31, 1903. 

562 — Hattie, b. Aug. 18, 1911 ; died Nov. 3, 1911. 

563 — Ethel, b. Aug. 18, 1911 ; died Oct. 20, 1911. 

412 

Marcus Melgrove Coon (8), son of John D. and Harriet 
Augusta (Griffin) Coon, born August 11, 1882; married Jan. 1, 
1907, to Ethel Steer. 

He is now (1924) living in Dundas, Ont. 

CHILDREN: 

564 — Dorothy M., b. Oct. 17, 1908. 

565— Ralph, b. Dec. 21, 1909. 

566 — Victoria, b. Dec. 21, 1909. 

567 — Marjorie, b. Sept. 25, 1911. 




ALVIN DOUGLAS GRIFFIN 

(See No. 489) 




A PIONEER FAMILY 



93 



414 

Hattie Maybella Coon (8), daughter of John D. and Harriet 
Augusta (Griffin) Coon, bbrn June 29, 1889; married Nov. 4, 
1908, to Fred C. Donovan. Their home is in Hamilton, Ont. 

CHILD: 

568 — Charles Melgrove, b. Jan. 3, 1911. 



416 

Lome Griffin (8), son of W. Nelson and Regenna (Smith) 
Griffin, was born at Winona, March 31, 1881. He is a machinist 
and resides in Hamilton. He married Sept. 12, 1905, Esther Hill, 
daughter of John Hill. 

CHILDREN: 

569 — Wilfred Lome, b. July 8, 1906. 

570 — Walter Ednnlnd, b. Oct. 23, 1908. 



419 

Louisa Jane Griffin (8), daughter of William Ryerson Griffin 
and Almira (Smith) Griffin, born April 2, 1854; married Levi 
Henry Hatch, November 23, 1871. 

CHILDREN: 

571 — Mary Louisa, b. Aug. 29, 1872. 

572 — Alberta Serena, b. July 27, 1874; d. Nov. 7, 1888. 

573 — Annie Almira, b. Oct. 3, 1876. 

574 — Ernest Emerson, b. Sept. 27, 1878; d. Nov. 7, 1878. 

575 — Frank Edgar, b. Oct. 15, 1881; d. April 17, 1885. 

576 — Nora May, b. March 23, 1885. 

577 — David Ryerson, b. Sept. 1, 1886. 



94 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



421 

William Henry Griffin (8), son of William Ryerson and 
Almira (Smith) Griffin, b. July 15, 1859; married Nov. 10, 1883, 
Maggie Celista Cams. 

CHILDREN: 

578 — Philo, b. Dec. 2, 1884. 

579 — Charlie, b. Oct. 30, 1885. 

580 — Henry Pearl, b. Ang. 23, 1887. 

581 — Robert Harry, b. Oct. 21, 1889. 

422 

Ransom L. Griffin (8), eldest son of Thomas I. and Alice 
(Atkinson) Griffin, born Jan. 6, 1855; married Sept. 28, 1882, 
Minnie K. Brooks, and settled in Evanston, 111. 

CHILDREN: 

582— Alice J., b. Dec. 2, 1883. 

583 — Florence A., b. Aug. 5, 1889. 



427 

Abram Binkley Griffin (8), eldest son of Burwell and 
Delilah (Binkley) Griffin, born in East Flamboro Tp., April 8, 
1854; married Ada Davidson. Carried on a general mercantile 
business in London, Ont., several years; afterwards, for many 
years, was a successful merchant in Toronto, and is now resident 
in California. 

CHILDREN: 

584 — Ormand. 

585 — Frank. 

586 — Walter. 

587— Percy. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



95 



428 

Wellington S. Griffin (8), son of Burwell and Delilah (Bink- 
ley) Griffin, born March 23, 1856; married Kate Newell. Is a 
successful farmer in East Flamboro Township, near Waterdown, 
Ont. 

429 

Florence E. Griffin (8), daughter of Burwell and Delilah 
(Binkley) Griffin, born April 20, 1858; married John W. Rymal. 

CHILDREN: 

588 — Edith. 

589 — Gertie. 

590 — Harry. 

591 — Norman. 

592— Arthur. 

431 

Peter Franklin Griffin (8), son of Burwell and Delilah (Bink- 
ley) Griffin; born April 8, 1862; married Clara Dawes. He 
taught school for a time; afterward engaged in farming several 
years in East Flamboro, Ont., and is now (1924) in the service 
of the Dominion Government as an excise officer. He is a Meth- 
odist in religion, a successful Sunday School teacher, with long 
experience as leader of a Bible class, and is a life long advocate 
of the prohibition of the liquor traffic. He resides in Hamilton 
and has no children. 

432 

Arthur C. Griffin (8), son of Burwell and Delilah (Binkley) 
Griffin, born March 23, 1864; married Britannia Featherston. 
No children. 



96 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



433 

John W. Griffin (8), son of Burwell and Delilah (Binkley) 
Griffin, born April 22, 1866 ; married Annie Buttrum, of Ancaster 
Township. He is a merchant and mill owner in Waterdown, Ont., 
where he has served as a councillor in the village council. 

CHILDREN : 

593 — Francis, b. June 5, 1904. 

594 — Eugene, b. Dec. 28, 1911. 



434 

Burwell Griffin (8), son of Burwell and Delilah (Binkley) 
Griffin, born April 22, 1869; married Allie Robertson, of Ham- 
ilton, and settled in Hamilton, Ont., where he has a prosperous 
drug business. 

CHILDREN: 

595 — Elizabeth, b. Feb. 1, 1899. 

596 — Jean, b. August 5, 1901. 



436 

Robert C. Griffin (8), son of Burwell und Delilah (Binkley) 
Griffin, born Feb. 9, 1873; married Aggie Colyer. 

(CHILD: 

597 — Charles Earl, b. April 11, 1900. 



439 

Mabel Griffin (8), daughter of Burwell and Delilah (Binkley) 
Griffin, born July 18, 1877; married Orley B. Griffin (8), son of 
James Nelson Griffin (7). See No. 508. 



GEORGE ERASTUS GRIFFIN, MRS. LUCINDA (DAVIS) GRIFFIN, 

WITH THEIR CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN, IN 1901 
(See No. 299) 




A PIONEER FAMILY 



97 



441 

Alma Griffin (8), daughter of Burwell and Delilah (Binkley) 
Griffin, b. Jan. 30, 1884; married Ernest VanDusen. 

CHILD: 

598 — Raymond Burwell, b. July 15, 1917. 

468 

Caroline Augusta Griffin (8), eldest daughter of James Kent 
and Almira (Dyke) Griffin, born May 30, 1846; died March 30, 
1908. She married, May 30, 1872, Rev. John Ridley. 

CHILD: 

599 — Edith, born in 1879; died March 8, 1908. 

469 

Edwin Culver Griffin (8), eldest son of James K. and Almira 
(Dyke) Griffin, born in Waterdown, Jan. 29, 1848; died in Boston, 
December 10, 1911. He was an engineer and contractor, who built 
a number of iron bridges in the Province of Ontario. For 
several years he was engaged in the lumber business, having a 
sawmill at Orr Lake, Ont. Later he removed to the United 
States and was for a number of years engaged in the manufac- 
ture and sale of the Griffin mill for grinding ores, which was in- 
vented by his father and improved by himself. It is very ex- 
tensively used throughout the civilized world. He married 
Lovina Hopkinson, who was born in Ontario, Aug. 1, 1855. 

CHILDREN: 

600 — Alice Gertrude, b. April 4, 1880, in Waterdown, Ont. 

601 — Mary Josephine, b. April 22, 1882, in Waterdown, Ont. 

602 — James Edwin, b. July 4, 1885, in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

603 — Harold Hopkinson, b. July 17, 1890, in West Newton, 
Mass. 

604 — Roger Newton, b. May 11, 1894, in West Newton, Mass. ; 
died Jan. 23, 1910. 



98 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



470 

Josephine Maria Griffin (8), daughter of James K. and 
Almira (Dyke) Griffin, born Oct. 19, 1849 ; died Dec. 24, 1875. 
She married in November, 1874, James Montgomery. 

CHILD: 

605 — Arthur, born December, 1875 ; died in 1877. 

471 

Wilhelmina Ellis Griffin (8), third daughter of James K. and 
Almira (Dyke) Griffin, born in Waterdown, October 8, 1851; 
married in March, 1876, William B. Smith, druggist, of Guelph, 
Ont. Mr. Smith was Mayor of Guelph in 1893 and 1894. 

CHILDREN: 

606 — Josephine, born in 1879; m. Sept. 6, 1905, Dr. Nath- 
aniel Leander Berry, of Lynn, Mass. They have two children. 

607 — Herbert, born in 1882, was an officer in the American 
Expeditionary Force in the great war of 1914-1918. Now resides 
in Seattle, Washington. 

Mrs. Smith and both her children now (1924) reside in 
Seattle, Wash, U. S. A. 



472 

Frederick Thomas Griffin (8), second son of James Kent and 
Almira (Dyke) Griffin, born at Waterdown, Ont, Oct. 29, 1853. 
He was educated in the public and grammer schools of Water- 
down and Hamilton. For a time he was employed in the Went- 
worth County Registry Office, which he left to take a position 
in the Ontario Department of Education. In 1883 he entered 
the service of the Canadian Pacific Railway in its land depart- 
ment. Col. George Ham, in an article which appeared in Mc- 
Lean’s Magazine of March 15, 1921, about old-time employees 
of the C. P. R, speaks of him as follows: 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



99 



“Fred. T. Griffin entered the Company’s service in 1883 as 
a clerk in the land department, and seven years later succeeded 
L. A. Hamilton as Land Commissioner, on the retirement of that 
gentleman, who had initiated a generous policy, and it was both 
his and his successor’s boast that the Company never evicted a 
settler; but had allowed many, who had left the country for 
various reasons, to return and re-occupy their farms as if noth- 
ing had happened. Mr. Griffin retired in 1917.” 

On Sept. 25, 1878, Frederick T. Griffin married Edna Walker. 

'CHILDREN: 

608 — Arthur Lionel, b. Oct. 25, 1879. He died March 23, 
1916, in England, where he was captain and paymaster in the 
Canadian Expeditionary Force. 

609 — Frank F., b. April 8, 1882. 

610 — Gerald Hamilton, b. Aug. 31, 1889. 

Frederick T. Griffin is now (1924) residing in Winnipeg. 
He is Chief Commissioner of the North-West Land Co., and is a 
director of several companies. 

473 

Albert Dyke Griffin (8), third son of James K. and Almira 
(Dyke) Griffin, born in Waterdown, Ont., Dec. 14, 1855. He was 
for a number of years mathematical master in Woodstock Col- 
legiate Institute. He resigned this position to devote himself 
to his chosen profession of land surveyor and civil engineer. He 
is now located in Port Arthur, Ont. In 1883 he married Ida 
Cameron, of Oakwood, Ont. 

CHILDREN: 

611 — Frederick, b. Aug. 12, 1884; d. Dec., 1889. 

612 — Henry Launcelot, b. Dec. 31, 1885. 

613 — Marian Louise, b. Aug. 4, 1887 ; m. Captain George 
Burbidge, of the Canadian Expeditionary Force. They now 
live at Fort William, Ont. 



100 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



614 — Geoffrey Cameron, b. March 19, 1893; served in the 
Princess Patricia’s Light Infantry regiment in France; was 
wounded at battle of Langemark and invalided home May 15, 
1915. Married Jan. 7, 1919, Kathleen Barolf. They reside in 
Winnipeg, Man. 



474 

Rev. Arthur Kent Griffin, M. A. (8), son of James Kent and 
Almira E. (Dyke) Griffin, was born at Waterdown, Ont., Nov. 
11, 1858. He matriculated at the University of Toronto in 1877. 
He then taught school for some time, but on making choice of 
the ministry he completed his academic education at Western 
University and Huron Diocesan Theological College, London, 
Ont. He was ordained Priest in 1886 and in the same year was 
appointed assistant at the Church of the Redeemer, Toronto. 
In 1888 he married Elizabeth Lucretia, daughter of F. C. Powell, 
Esq., Principal of the Model School, Kincardine, Ont., a lady of 
exceptional intellectual and spiritual gifts, who died in 1923. 
After ministering in several parishes, in 1904 he associated him- 
self with his brother-in-law, Canon I. W. Powell, D. D., in St. 
Clement’s School for Boys and girls, North Toronto. On the or- 
ganization of St. Clement’s College, a resident school for boys, 
he became House Master, and in 1910, when Canon Powell be- 
came President of King’s University, Windsor, N. S., he was 
made Principal. In 1917 the college was removed to Brampton, 
Ont., but has since returned to Toronto. In addition to his 
academic work, Mr. Griffin has also engaged in parochial work, 
for three years of the time being rector of St. James’ Church, 
Humber Bay. Although for twenty years his work has been 
mainly academic, in which Mrs. Griffin was closely associated, 
he has felt that he is fulfilling a most important function of his 
ministry in the training of the young, for religious education is 
a fundamental part of St. Clement’s curriculum, and the part it 
has played in the formation of the character of the many boys 




REV. ARTHUR KENT GRIFFIN 
(See No. 474) 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



101 



who have passed through his hands, has justified his choice of 
work. 

CHILDREN: 

615 — Selwyn Powell, b. Feb. 15, 1892. 

616 — Arthur Kent, b. Feb. 8, 1893. 



479 

Justus A. Griffin (8), son of George Douglas and Cynthia 
Ann (Williams) Griffin, was born in Waterdown, Ont., June 6, 
1846. He was married on June 30, 1880, at Stamford, Ont., by Rev. 
Robert Acheson, to Sara Acheson, youngest daughter of John 
and Mary J. (Moore) Acheson, of Hamilton, Ont., formerly of 
Newtown Hamilton, County Armagh, Ireland. He was educated 
in the public schools, with a year in the classical school of J. Re- 
gan and prepared for matriculation in the University, then served 
an apprenticeship to the printing business, afterwards being em- 
ployed on several newspapers, including the “Canada Christian 
Advocate,” “Barrie Review,” the “Manitoban” and the “Mani- 
toba Free Press,” having been one of the original staff of the 
Free Press, the first number of which was issued Nov. 9, 1872. 
In the fiftieth anniversary number, published Nov. 9, 1922, he 
contributed a page of reminiscenses. As a member of the 13th 
Royal Volunteer Regiment, he served seven years, including six 
months’ active service in 1865-66, and in October, 1871, enlisted 
in the battalion of rifles which went, under Colonel Thomas Scott, 
to Fort Garry by the Dawson Canoe Route, and spent a year in 
that service ; in 1872 he published an account of that expedition 
in a 64-page pamphlet under the title of “Toronto to Fort Garry, 
Diary of a Private Soldier.” Winnipeg at that time had about 
one thousand, five hundred inhabitants. 

In 1873 he returned to Hamilton, and in partnership with 
George R. Roberts commenced a printing business with the name 
of Roberts & Griffin. That business has been continued to the 
present time, and is now known as “The Griffin & Richmond Co., 
Limited,” of which he is president. 



102 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



Justus Griffin has always been interested in history, par- 
ticularly that of Canada; he has been a member of the Went- 
worth Historical Society from the time of its organization in 
1889, was secretary eleven years and president two years. He 
has since boyhood been closely identified with religious and tem- 
perance activities and taught in Sunday School about forty-five 
years. His wife died October 30, 1903. 

'CHILDREN: 

617 — Bertha Acheson, born June 15, 1881 ; died Aug. 3, 1881. 

618 — Kuth Moore, born Nov. 26, 1885. 



481 

Horatio Milford Griffin (8), second son of George D. and 
Cynthia Ann (Williams) Griffin, born in Waterdown, Ont., April 
10, 1849; married Aug. 6, 1878, Sarah Maria Porte, daughter of 
J. W. Porte, jeweler, of Picton, Ontario. She died in April, 1880, 
of typhoid fever. 

CHILD: 

619 — Grace Lillian, born in Hamilton, Ont., July 1, 1879. 

In June, 1908, H. M. Griffin married his second wife, Eliza- 
beth Angelina Spiers, eldest daughter of Mr. Spiers, of 
Galt, Ont. They reside in Galt. H. M. Griffin was for a number 
of years engaged in mercantile business, in several towns, but 
since 1885 has been the head of the Beaver Manufacturing Co., 
of Galt. In the course of his business life he has travelled ex- 
tensively in every province of Canada and has acquired an intim- 
ate acquaintance with the business, the business men, and the 
resources of the country. A devout Christian, he has been all 
his life an active worker in church, Sunday School and temper- 
ance activities, not only at home, but in his journeys throughout 
the land. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



103 



483 

Charles Henry Griffin (8), third son of George D. and Cynthia 
Ann (Williams) Griffin, was born in Waterdown, Ont., Jan. 24, 
1856. He was for many years employed in the Solicitor’s Depart- 
ment of the Great Western Railway, and after the amalgamation 
of that road with the Grand Trunk he occupied an important 
position in the legal department of the Grand Trunk Railway 
until his death, after a few days’ illness, on the 31st January, 
1889. He was an active member of the Methodist Church in 
Belleville, Ont., where he resided. He married, Aug. 19, 1880, 
Amelia Priscilla Ecclestone (generally known as Tillie), daughter 
of W. T. Ecclestone, merchant, of Hamilton, Ont. 

-CHILDREN: 

620 — Ernest Chester, b. March 14, 1882, in Hamilton; d. 
March, 1883. 

621 — Constance Marion, b. Dec. 14, 1883, in Hamilton. 

Following is a poetical appreciation by a Toronto legal 
friend of C. H. Griffin: 

Alasi! and is it true that Griffin’s dead? 

’Twas but a day or two ago we met 
And laughed and talked and walked together, 

And now sad eyes with tears are wet. 

From out a sky serene and calmest weather 
Fate’s bolt has shot. His home has lost its head. 

As when across the peaceful forest glade 
The storm doth with resistless fury pour, 

Uprooting stately trees, or far at sea 
Doth force the gallant ship a wreck ashore, 

So passed the bright young life at His decree, 

Who for His pleasure all things here hath made. 

Nor hath he lived or died to us in vain; 

The kindly, genial spirit, modest worth; 

The firm discharge of duty, work well done, 

True to his trust, and honest from his birth 
To death. A tender husband, faithful son, 

Well may we trust, aye, know, to him ‘ ‘ to die was gain.” 



Toronto, 3rd Feb., 1889. 



— T. E. M. 



104 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



485 

Watson Griffin, F.R.G.S., F.R.S.A., F.I.I. (8), son of George 
D. and Cynthia Ann (Williams) Griffin, born in Hamilton, Ont., 
Nov. 4, 1860. After teaching school for a year and a half he 
entered journalism, obtaining his first experience on the Ham- 
ilton Spectator, working for a year on a Buffalo newspaper and 
becoming news editor of The Toronto Evening News at the age 
of 22. In January, 1885, he joined thel staff of the Montreal 
Daily Star and a year later became managing editor of the 
Montreal Family Herald and Weekly Star, a position he held 
for many years. He was afterward chief editorial writer of the 
Montreal Daily Star for some time. From 1902 to 1906 he con- 
ducted what was known as the “Made in Canada Educational 
Campaign,” designed to educate Canadians to favor home pro- 
ducts in preference to foreign goods. He afterwards returned to 
journalism and during the anti-reciprocity campaign that led to 
the defeat of the Laurier Government, his articles against re- 
ciprocity with the United States were published week after 
week in 433 weekly newspapers throughout Canada. In 1912 he 
became Industrial Commissioner of Brandon, Manitoba, and in 
January, 1914, the Canadian Government sent him on a special 
mission to the British West Indies to report on trade possibili- 
ties under the Preferential Trade agreement. He was afterward, 
for a period of five years, Superintendent of the Commercial 
Intelligence Service of the Department of Trade and Commerce, 
all the Canadian Trade Commissioners throughout the world 
being under his direction. He is a Fellow of the Royal 
Geographical Society, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, 
a Fellow of the Imperial Institute, a member of the West 
India Committee, and was a member of the first Canadian Com- 
mittee of the British Science Guild. He is the author of “Canada, 
the Country of the Twentieth Century,” “Canada and the 
British West Indies,” “Canada, the Land of Waterways,” pre- 
pared at the request of the American Geographical Society, 
“The Provinces and the States,” “An Irish Evolution,” “Pro- 




WATSON GRIFFIN, F. R. S. A., F. 1. 1. 
(See No. 485) 




A PIONEER FAMILY 



105 



tection and Prices,” the novel “Twok,” and a number of maga- 
zine articles. His book, “Protection and Prices,” published in 
1904, reached a circulation of 154,000 copies. The Canadian 
Government sent about 6,000 copies of his book “Canada, the 
Country of the Twentieth Century,” abroad to British Consuls, 
Canadian Trade Commissioners and various commercial and 
scientific organizations. It received highly complimentary press 
notices, not only in Canada, but also in many other countries, 
being referred to as the most comprehensive and valuable refer- 
ence book on Canada ever published. The Scottish Geographical 
Magazine described it as a marvellous compendium of informa- 
tion, admirable in form. His book “Canada and the British 
West Indies,” received high encomiums from leading men of the 
British West Indies as well as from the press. His proposal for 
a Britannic Council of Premiers made in the Empire Review of 
May, 1902, attracted wide attention. It became an accomplished 
fact when Lloyd George called the Dominion Premiers to a war 
council. There have already been three meetings of the Britannic 
Council of Premiers, the first attended by Sir Robert Borden, 
the second by Hon. Arthur Meighan, and the third by Hon. Mac- 
kenzie King, as representatives of Canada. The Hamilton Spec- 
tator, referring to the War Council of Premiers, said: “Among 
all the suggestions that have been made in the direction of Im- 
perial Federation, Mr. Watson Griffin’s appears to have stood 
the test of time, doubtless because most in harmony with the 
genius of British evolution. His plan meets the demand for 
greater coherence and co-operation throughout the Empire, with- 
out in the least infringing on local autonomy.” 

The late Principal Grant, of Queen’s University, in a review 
of “Canada, the Land of Waterways,” said: “As might have 
been expected from Mr. Watson Griffin’s other writings, the 
spirit is as admirable as the execution is careful.” 

The novel “Twok,” completed at the age of 24, received 
many complimentary press notices, from which the following are 
selected : 



106 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



Ottawa Journal: “A readable, healthy and even striking 
story, commanding the interest of the reader from start to finish/ ’ 

Montreal Gazette: “An ingenious and interesting story. 
Mr. Griffin has originality, constructive ability and considerable 
tact as a story-teller.” 

Toronto Mail: “Mr. Griffin outlined a plot with rare skill 
and marshalled his characters with consummate ability, the re- 
sult being a book of intense interest.” 

Toronto Globe: “The tale is full of local color, is marked by 
a good deal of curious observation, and has the great literary 
merit of being unpretentious.” 

Dublin Evening Mail: “There is a great deal of originality 
in this story. It is healthy and entertaining. The plot is in- 
geniously constructed and the story is told in a simple and grace- 
ful manner.” 

Philadelphia American: “A domestic story, somewhat out 
of the common run; enhanced by numerous clever realistic 
touches. ’ ’ 

Buffalo Express: “The story is interesting — unique in some 
respects.” 

Cleveland Leader: “There is a great deal of human interest 
in this story.” 

New York Church Union: “It is a pure, harmless story, but 
is crowned with a true novel’s ending, such as gives the sensa- 
tional thrill without which a novel is unsatisfying.” 

Quebec Chronicle: “A most interesting and striking story. 
The scene of the novel is laid in Canada, and the incident, scenery 
and conversations are managed with tact and skill. Mr. Griffin 
writes with great taste and spirit. The philosophy is charming. 
It is a real credit to the author and to the country. The love- 
making is particularly well done.” 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



107 



486 

George Alexander Griffin (8), son of George Douglas and 
Cynthia Ann (Williams) Griffin, was born in Hamilton, Ont., 
June 1, 1863. After a short experience in life insurance he en- 
tered the service of a large Canadian subscription book publish- 
ing company and at an early age took the management of the 
business. Afterward he carried on an extensive book publishing 
business in Mexico, Central America and South America, having 
scientific books translated from English into Spanish. After 
returning to Canada he devoted some years to the promotion of 
certain inventions, but later became connected with an import- 
ant publishing house in Philadelphia, taking a highly responsible 
position. After the outbreak of the great war he returned to 
Canada and enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force in 
1915. Later he became secretary for a light and power company 
in Monterey, Mexico, controlled by the Mackenzie and Mann 
interests. He spent some time in Mexico in connection with the 
business of that company. He resided in Guelph for some years, 
but is now living in Oakville. He married, Aug. 12, 1891, Maude 
Porte, of Guelph, who died in 1915. 

CHILDREN: 

622 — Nora, b. Dec. 30, 1893, in Guelph, Ont. 

623 — George Campbell, b. April 20, 1895, in Guelph. 

624 — Jean, b. in Guelph, in 1899, is a trained nurse, resides 
in Toronto. 

625 — John Porte, b. in Guelph, Oct., 1903. 

489 

Alvin Douglas Griffin (8), son of George D. and Cynthia Ann 
(Williams) Griffin, was born in Hamilton, Ont., Sept. 18, 1871 ; 
married, in St. Jude’s Church, Oakville, Ont., April 13, 1912, 
Lena Beatrice Bovell, daughter of the late Howard Bovell, of 
Toronto. He was for some years cashier of the Canada Accident 



108 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



Company, Montreal, which position he resigned to accept a better 
appointment in New York. He now (1924) holds a very import- 
ant position in the head offices of the Singer Sewing Machine 
Company, in whose interest he has a number of times visited 
Great Britain, Germany, Russia and Belgium, in connection with 
the company's factories in those countries. He now resides in 
Scarsdale, N. Y., where Capt. Jonathan Griffin, a brother of one 
of our ancestors, is buried in the Presbyterian churchyard. 

•CHILDREN: 

626 — Cynthia Howard, b. Sept. 13, 1913. 

627 — Nancy Bovell, b. March 25, 1917. 

490 

Herbert Spohn Griffin, B. A., M. D., C. M. (8), son of William 
S. and Mary Margaret (Spohn) Griffin, was born at Mount Pleas- 
ant, Ont. He married, first, Carrie Moore, daughter of Lyman 
Moore, of Hamilton; she died in 1892. They had no children. 
His second wife was Edith Moore Robinson, daughter of the late 
W. A. Robinson, and granddaughter of Dennis Moore, the iron 
founder, of Hamilton. After practicing for a short time in 
Northern Ontario he located in Hamilton, where he had a very 
large practice, and won distinction as a surgeon and general 
practitioner. He was honored with the presidency of the Medical 
Association and was for many years surgeon of the 13th Royal 
Regiment of Hamilton, from which he retired with the rank of 
Lieut.-Colonel. He died June 28, 1921. 

Extract from the Hamilton Spectator : 

“Dr. H. S. Griffin, one of Hamilton’s oldest and most prom- 
inent medical practitioners, died at his home, Main street east, 
last evening. 

“Dr. Griffin has been in poor health for many months, his 
health having been for some time past such as to occasion the 
gravest alarm. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



109 



“Both in his public and private capacities, Dr. Griffin was 
widely known and highly esteemed. A host of personal friends 
among* his associates and patients will mourn his passing, for 
his kindliness and ability endeared him to all with whom he had 
to do. The skill and sympathy which combined to make him 
one of the busiest and best-liked physicians and surgeons Ham- 
ilton ever knew, were always at the disposal of the needy, and 
there are to his credit very many acts of unostentatious charity 
which are known only to those who benefited from them. 

“In military and Masonic circles Dr. Griffin had been for 
many years a leading figure; while in political life, also, he was 
at one time prominent. 

“Dr. Griffin’s early education was acquired at the public 
schools, and afterwards, for a time, he attended the Guelph Gram- 
mar school. In 1870, in his 16th year, he matriculated at the 
University of Toronto, and in 1874, at the age of twenty, he was 
graduated in arts from this university. Entering the faculty of 
medicine here, he received his degree of M. B. in 1878. Later he 
was graduated as M. D., C. M., from Victoria University. In the 
course of his studies he attended Bellevue Hospital, New York, 
and also the University College of Physicians and Surgeons. In 
his studies he won distinction, carrying off the gold medal for 
proficiency in the University of Toronto.” 

CHILDREN: 

628 — William Eric, b. Sept. 25, 1896. 

629 — Howard Stanley, born Aug. 9, 1899, is a civil engineer. 

630 — Herbert Kent, b. March 6, 1902. 

631 — John Douglas Moorcroft, b. June 3, 1906. 

494 

Margaret Griffin (8), daughter of William Smith and Hannah 
(Biggar) Griffin, born June 12, I860; married Robert Kay, 
jeweler, of Detroit, Mich. 



110 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



CHILD: 

632 — Margaret. 



495 

Georgiana Louise Nellis (8), daughter of John and Eleanor 
R. (Griffin) Nelles, born Dec. 7, 1855; married, March 12, 1880, 
Henry Stalker, of Detroit, Mich., U. S. A. 

‘CHILDREN: 

634 — John Nellis, born May 20, 1881. 

635 — Harold G., b. April 14, 1883; died in New York. 

636 — Thomas Arthur, b. Sept. 27, 1891. 

637 — Eleanor, b. Nov. 24 (Thanksgiving Day), 1893. 



496 

Frank E. Nellis (8), son of John E. and Eleanor R. (Griffin) 
Nellis, was born in Waterdown, Ont., March 27, 1857. He mar- 
ried, in May, 1909, Carrie Goetz, who survives him. He died 
suddenly, Sept. 2, 1923. The following extracts from newspapers, 
which wrote lengthy appreciative articles about him, give some 
idea of the character and ability of Frank Nellis : 

“When Frank E. Nellis was a young lad his parents came 
to Michigan, locating in Wyandotte, where Mr. Nellis, Sr., began 
publishing a weekly newspaper. At the age of 15 Frank entered 
the office, under supervision and instruction of his father. Here 
was laid the foundation destined to be the superstructure on 
which was built a name and reputation seldom attained in liter- 
ary fields by one who is termed a self-made man. 

“A few years later, in 1879, desiring a larger field, they 
came to Mt. Clemens and bought ‘The Monitor.’ Here the pub- 
lishing partnership of J. E. Nellis & Son was formed, and still 
exists, though both have passed on. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



111 



“His editorial writings were of a style peculiarly his own. 
They were strong and fearless. He called a spade a spade, and 
a crook a crook. They were copied by many of the big dailies. 
Repeated offers to grace the editorial chair of a magazine or city 
paper were refused. 

“For many years no banquet was complete in Mt. Clemens 
unless the name of Frank E. Nellis appeared as toastmaster. 
His stories, pertinent remarks, battle of wits and repartee, made 
him in big demand. Without notice he could make an impromptu 
speech better than the average prepared effort. He was always 
ready. 

“Investments and business interests outside of ‘The Monitor’ 
were of no small consideration. He was vice-president and dir- 
ector of the Ullrich Savings bank, and director of the New Haven 
State Bank, Stephens bank, at Halfway, and a stock holder in 
several other county financial institutions, besides being interest- 
ed in the Mt. Clemens Sugar Co.” — Mount Clemens Monitor. 

“With the passing of Frank E. Nellis, editor, publisher, 
banker, man of affairs, and a Mason, the writer feels a personal 
loss that is deeply felt. An acquaintance of 44 years had led us 
to an understanding of one of the most unique characters of the 
nation. Frank E. Nellis was one of the last of the famous “per- 
sonal journalists” who flourished and made themselves felt 
along the lines of literature and politics. No better student of 
human nature ever lived than Frank E. Nellis. He ranked as a 
forceful, keen, sarcastic writer along with Dana, Story, Raymond, 
Bennett, and others, who have long since passed away. The 
school of “personal journalism” has gone and been succeeded 
by that of paternalism and commercialism. As a friend, Frank 
E. Nellis was staunch and true ; as an enemy, he was vindictive, 
sarcastic and belicose, but always fair and open. There was 
nothing in him of the “trimmer.” The death of Mr. Nellis is to 
be deplored, and he will long live in the hearts of those who 
knew and loved him.” — Rochester Era. 



112 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



498 

Nellie Nellis (8), daughter of Jane and Eleanor R. (Griffin) 
Nellis, born in the Province of Ontario, Oct. 17, 1862 ; married 
John C. Quintus, March 24, 1886. 

CHILD : 

638 — Katrina, born in Buffalo, N. Y., June 11, 1898. 



499 

Grace Nellis (8), daughter of John and Eleanor R. (Griffin) 
Nellis, born in Michigan, Jan. 11, 1874; married W. S. Jenney, 
June 22, 1899. Mrs. Jenney is engaged in literary work; among 
other undertakings, she edits the Woman’s Page in The Michigan 
Farmer. 

CHILDREN: 

639 — John, born Nov. 1, 1907. 

640 — Edwinia, born Aug. 18, 1910. 



502 

Harry Spohn (8), son of Wesley and Eliza (Griffin) Spohn, 
was born Sept. 19, 1867 ; he married Millie Shaw, Jan. 1, 1895. 
He is a farmer, occupying the old homestead occupied by the 
family for one hundred and thirty years. 

CHILDREN: 

641 — Bessie Eleanor, born Sept. 2, 1897. 

642 — Mary Margaret. 

643 — Nora Evelyn. 

644 — Herbert. 

644| — Edna Griffin. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



113 



503 

Nellie Spohn (8), daughter of Wesley and Eliza A. (Griffin) 
Spohn, b. Nov. 30, 1870; married William McClemont, barrister, 
of Hamilton. 

(CHILDREN: 

645 — Frederick M., b. April 11, 1897, died young. 

646 — William Porter, b. Jan. 6, 1901, is a barrister. 

647 — Herbert, b. July 8, 1902 ; died July 31, 1902. 

648 — Harry, b. July 8, 1902; died July 31, 1902. 

649 — Amy Elizabeth, b. Feb. 19, 1904. 

650 — Eleanor Louise, b. April 8, 1906. 

651 — Melville Spohn, b. July 14, 1910. 

652 — Constance Isobel, b. May 25, 1913. 



521 

Grace H. Griffin (8), daughter of Robert W. and Hulda 
(Sprockhoff) Griffin, born Dec. 1, 1897 ; married Oct. 1, 1917, 
Lloyd E. Rose, farmer, and they settled near Thomas, Dakota. 

CHILDREN: 

653 — Evelyn, born April 30, 1919. 

654 — Shirley, born Sept. 7, 1920. 



523 

Georgia Burt Griffin (8), daughter of Colborne N. and Mary 
M. (Burt) Griffin, born Sept. 15, 1891; married Otho J. South- 
wood, Oct. 9, 1910. 

CHILD: 

655 — Otho Kenneth Stanley, b. March 7, 1912. 



8 



114 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



524 

Edna Alice Griffin (8), daughter of Colborne N. and Mary 
M. (Burt) Griffin, born May 17, 1894; married, Oct. 26, 1912, 
to Wm. M. Doherty. 

CHILDREN : 

656 — Bernard William, b. July 2, 1913. 

657 — Mildred Harriet, b. Dec. 26, 1914. 

658 — Doris Grace, b. Dec. 7, 1916. 



525 

Cyrus Stanley Griffin (8), son of Colborne N. and Mary M. 
(Burt) Griffin, born Feb. 19, 1896; married Mildred Grace Van 
Every, Feb. 8, 1919. They reside in Detroit, Mich. 

535 

Ira Stuart Griffin (8), son of Jacob Anson and Charity 
(Smuck) Griffin, b. in 1863; married Jessie Pearson, of Gains- 
borough Township, Ont. 

CHILDREN: 

659 — Mary E., who died young. 

660 — Jacob Ira. 

Ira Stuart Griffin and his family removed from this country, 
and nothing further has been learned about them. 

537 

Bansom Merritt Griffin (8), son of James Nelson and Matilda 
(Gould) Griffin, born Aug. 29, 1859, at Smith ville, Ont.; married 
Sarah Tanner, of Smithville. He carried on business in Wood- 
stock several years, then removed to Hamilton, where he con- 
ducts a commission business. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



115 



CHILDREN: 

661 — Curtis William, b. Nov. 20, 1882. 

662 — Theresa Susan, b. June 3, 1884; m. July 6, 1912, James 
Kenney, of Woodstock, Ont. 

663 — Harold, b. June 25, 1897. He served in the Canadian 
Expeditionary Force in War of 1914-1918. 

539 

Orley Burgess Griffin (8), son of James Nelson and Eleanor 
J. (Roszel) Griffin, daughter of Charles Roszel, of Grimsby, Ont. ; 
born March 3, 1875; married Mabel Griffin, daughter of Bur- 
well Griffin, of Waterdown, and settled in Waterdown, where he 
carried on a successful business as a general merchant, and was 
highly esteemed as a citizen and was distinguished as a church 
and Sunday School worker. In May, 1922, his home and business 
premises were destroyed in the disastrous fire which swept away 
a large section of the business part of the village. In September, 
1922, he and his family removed to California. 

CHILDREN: 

664 — Evelyn Mabel, b. Aug. 17, 1904. 

665 — Ena Delilah, b. March 29, 1906. 

666 — George Burwell, b. Oct. 24, 1907. 

667 — Allan Douglas, b. May 8, 1911. 

668 — Estella Hope, b. Dec. 5, 1919. 

540 

Aletta Victoria Griffin (8), daughter of James N. and Elea- 
nor J. (Roszel) Griffin, b. April 3, 1877 ; married Edward Day. 

CHILDREN: 

669 — Alethea, b. June 12, 1909. 

670 — Charles, b. March 6, 1911. 



116 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



544 

Ethel Cora Griffin (8), daughter of James N. and Eleanor 
J. (Roszel) Griffin, b. March 1, 1887 ; married Eddy Pickett. 

(CHILDREN: 

671 — Valeria, b. Feb. 28, 1908. 

672— Muriel, b. April 12, 1909. 

673— Hazel, b. Aug. 11, 1911. 

674 — Mary Ruth, b. Jan. 20, 1922. 



546 

George Lee Griffin (8), son of George Erastus and Lucinda 
Maria (Davis) Griffin, born March 17, 1858 ; married Helen Al- 
berta Roberts, daughter of William Roberts, of Smithville, Dec. 
25, 1883. 

9 

(CHILDREN: 

675 — Frank Burwell, b. June 29, 1885. 

676 — Ernest Archibald, b. March 2, 1888. 

677 — Florence Mildred, b. July 23, 1890. 

678 — Grace Helen, b. Jan. 4, 1894. 

679 — Jessie Edith, b. Sept. 16, 1898. 

680 — Annie Edna, b. Dec. 23, 1901. 



547 

William S. Griffin (8), son of George Erastus and Lucinda 
M. (Davis) Griffin, born Jan. 17, I860; married (first) Miss Emma 
Ness, of Smithville. After her death he married (second) Miss 
Sarah Monteith Thomas, of Port Robinson, Dec. 30, 1910. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



117 



548 

Charles Adelbert Griffin (8), son of George Erastus and 
Lucinda M. (Davis) Griffin, born March 24, 1862; married Miss 
Mary Claus, of Gainsborough, Sept. 15, 1891. No family. 

549 

Arthur Egerton Griffin (8), son of George Erastus and 
Lucinda M. (Davis) Griffin, born Feb. 11, 1867 ; married Miss 
Nettie Catharine St. John, of South Grimsby, Sept. 11, 1895, and 
settled in Hamilton, Ont. 

•CHILDREN: 

681 — Eva Lena, b. June 4, 1896; married Dec. 1, 1920, Walter 
Dawson. 

682 — George Norris, b. Nov. 11, 1897. 

683 — Sadie Marie, b. July 14, 1899. Is a graduate nurse. 

684 — William Clarence, b. Sept. 24, 1901. 

685 — Flossie Pearl, b. Oct. 25, 1904 (nurse in training). 

686 — Ruby Eleanor, b. March 11, 1907. 

687 — Reta Mildred, b. July 13, 1909 ; d. Aug. 13, 1918. 

688 — James Arthur, b. Nov. 14, 1911. 

689 — Jean Catharine, b. Sept. 2, 1913. 

690 — Gerald Ross, b. Feb. 16, 1919. 

550 

David Harley Griffin (8), son of George Erastus and Lucinda 
M. (Davis) Griffin, born August 25, 1871 ; married Theresa Rail- 
ton, of Caistor Township, May .22, 1901. He now resides in Ham- 
ilton, where he carries on a boot and shoe business. 

CHILDREN: 

691 — Ruth Evelyn, b. Jan. 19, 1903. 

692 — Vera Theresa, b. March 30, 1906. 



118 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



693— Doris Eileen, b. June 5, 1913 ; d. April 12, 1914. 

694 — Ward Harley, b. March 24, 1915. 

695 — Jean Railton, b. Oct. 17, 1917. 

551 

Maria Elena Griffin (8), daughter of George Erastus and 
Lucinda M. (Davis) Griffin, born Feb. 15, 1881; married Claire 
Errion, of Gainsborough Township, Ont., Jan. 25, 1911. 

CHILD: 

696 — Ruth, b. June, 1915. 

554 

Alanson Lovell Griffin Cobb (8), son of Richard W. and Jane 
(Griffin) Cobb; born April 20, 1857 ; married Ruey A. Osgood, of 
Ariel, Pa. 

CHILDREN: 

697 — Norma. 

698 — Richard Lovell. 



555 

Jane Kentfield Cobb (8), daughter of Richard W. and Jane 
(Griffin) Cobb, born Sept. 13, 1862; married Rolland Clark Pat- 
terson, of Smithville, Ont. 

CHILD: 

699— Clifford Cobb. 



556 

James Richard Patterson (8), son of James Alfred and Annie 
Elizabeth (Griffin) Patterson; born Aug. 23, 1880; married Flor- 
ence Celestine Joslin, April 27, 1918. 

'CHILD: 

700— Nellie Pearl, b. Feb. 11, 1920. 




ANNE ELIZABETH GRIFFIN 
(See No. 717) 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



119 



10th GENERATION 

600 

Alice Gertrude Griffin (9), daughter of Edwin Culver and 
Lovina (Hopkinson Griffin, born in Waterdown, Ont., April 4, 
1880; partly educated in New York and Boston, graduated from 
McGill University, Montreal, P. Q. She married, March 21, 1907, 
at West Newton, Mass., Ernest George Gnaedinger, who was 
born in Quebec. 

CHILDREN : 

701 — Margaret Lovina, b. Feb. 16, 1908, at Wallace, Idaho. 

702— -Constance, b. April 6, 1909, at Wallace. Idaho. 

703 — William Griffin, b. Oct. 16, 1910, at Wallace, Idaho. 

704— Gertrude, b. Oct. 18, 1914, at Wallace, Idaho. 

601 

Mary Josephine Griffin (9), daughter of Edwin Culver and 
Lovina (Hopkinson) Griffin, was born in Waterdown, Ont., April 
20, 1882; married June 12, 1912, at Ashmont, Mass., Arthur 
Henry Burns, who was born Dec. 31, 1883, at Worcester, Mass. 

CHILDREN: 

705 — Edith Griffin, b. Oct. 2, 1913, at Massachusetts. 

706 — Arthur Henry, b. Feb. 21, 1915. 

707— Roger Griffin, b. Sept. 25, 1918 ; d. Feb. 11, 1922, at 
Ridgewood, N. J. 

708 — Richard Francis, b. Jan. 23, 1921, at Paterson, N. J. 

602 

James Edwin Griffin (9), son of Edwin Culver and Lovina 
(Hopkinson) Griffin, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., July 4, 1885; 



120 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



married in New York, in 1914, to Freda Siebenescher, born in 
Germany. 

CHILDREN: 

709 — Madeline Constance, b. April 10, 1915. 

710 — Betty Hopkinson, b. Jan., 1917. 



603 



Harold Hopkinson Griffin (9), son of Edwin Culver and 
Lovina (Hopkinson) Griffin, was born in West Newton, Mass., 
July 17, 1890. Married, July 17, 1915, at Perth Amboy, N. J., to 
Cornelia L’Hommedieu, who was born Jan. 2, 1894, in Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

CHILDREN: 

711 — Culver Hopkinson, b. Aug. 4, 1916, at Newton Lower 
Falls, Mass. 

712 — Barbara Taylor, b. Oct. 20, 1919, at Paterson, N. J. 

713 — Natalie L’Hommedieu, b. April 2, 1921, at Paterson, 
N. J. 

714 — Jean Hamilton, b. Nov. 20, 1922, at Ridgewood, N. J. 



609 



Frank F. Griffin (9), son of Frederick Thomas and Edna 
(Walker) Griffin, born April 8, 1882; married June 4, 1911, 
May Hutchison. 

'CHILDREN : 

715 — Barbara, b. March 17, 1912. 

716 — Frederick Kent, b. July 28, 1913. 



610 

Gerald Hamilton Griffin, son of Frederick Thomas and Edna 
(Walker) Griffin, b. August 31, 1889; married May 1, 1920, 
Kathleen McManus. 




SELWYN POWELL GRIFFIN, B. A. 

In Overseas Forces. 

(See No. 615) 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



121 



CHILD: 

717 — Anne Elizabeth, b. Nov. 29, 1921. 

612 

Henry Lanncelot Griffin (9), son of Albert Dyke and Ida 
(Cameron) Griffin, b. Dec. 31, 1885; entered the employ of the 
Canadian Pacific Railway, in the General Offices. He married, 
Sept. 12, 1914, Meta Fraser, daughter of A. J. Fraser, Winnipeg. 

lOHILDREN: 

718 — Emily Allison, b. in Winnipeg, May 16, 1917. 

719 — Frederick Dyke, b. in Winnipeg, April 12, 1919. 

613 

Marian Louise Griffin (9), daughter of Albert Dyke and Ida 
(Cameron) Griffin, born Aug. 4, 1887 ; married June 24, 1916, 
Captain George Burbidge. 

614 

Geoffrey Cameron Griffin (9), son of Albert Dyke and Ida 
(Cameron) Griffin, born March 19, 1893; served in the great 
European War in Princess Patricia Regiment in France; was 
severely wounded at the battle of Langemark and invalided home 
May 15, 1918. He married, Jan. 7, 1919, Kathleen Barolf. 

615 

Selwyn Powell Griffin, B. A. (9), son of Rev. Arthur K. and 
Lucretia (Powell) Griffin, was born in 1892 at the rectory, Bur- 
ford, Ont. After passing through the public schools, he entered 
St. Clement’s School, North Toronto, from which he matriculated 
into Trinity University. After studying art for two years at 
Toronto Technical School he entered Trinity College, from which 



122 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



he graduated B. A. in 1914. During his college course he was one 
of the editors of “The Arbor,” and a member of the inter-Col- 
legiate Students’ Council. After his graduation he was editor 
of “The Varsity,” the College paper, for a year, while also at- 
tending the School of Pedagogy. In 1915 he was appointed an 
English Master in Harbord Collegiate Institute. Enlisting that 
year in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, he was for some time 
signalling instructor at Niagara and Valcartier camps and also 
in England. After the armistice he served with the rank of 
Captain in the Canadian War Records Office, London, England. 
Still teaching at Harbord Collegiate he has done some literary 
work in the way of play-writing, and is, now contributing to a 
number of daily papers a series of articles for every day on lead- 
ing events in Canadian History, under the title “This Day in 
Canada’s Past.” He was married in 1917 to Maude E. Gundy, 
only child of Frederick Gundy, Esq. 

(CHILDREN: 

720 — Derek Powell, born Aug. 20, 1920. 

721 — Phyllis Elizabeth, born Jan. 15, 1922. 

722 — Gordon Trevor, born Feb. 18, 1923. 



616 

Arthur Kent Griffin, M. A. (9), son of Rev. Arthur Kent and 
Lucretia (Powell) Griffin, was born Feb. 8, 1893. He was edu- 
cated at St. Clement’s College and Trinity College, Toronto. In 
1915 he graduated M. A. from Toronto University, and by it was 
nominated a Rhodes Scholar. During the war he was an officer 
in the Imperial Army and saw service in France and Russia, 
where he was wounded. In 1921 he graduated B. A. from Oxford 
University, and was married in London, England, to Leila Van 
Zant Mason, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Mason, Markham, 
Ont. The same year he was appointed head of the Y. M. C. A. 
work in Lodz, Poland. Returning to Canada in 1923, he was ap- 
pointed Professor of Classics in King’s University, Halifax, N. S. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



123 



618 

Ruth Moore Griffin (9), daughter of Justus A. and Sara 
(Acheson) Griffin, born Nov. 26, 1885; married Dec. 15, 1921, 
Rev. Ernest Sanderson, pastor of the Methodist church at Hem- 
lock, N. Y. He was born in England, April, 1885. 

CHILD: 

723— Mary Griffin, born March 2, 1924. 

619 

Grace Lillian Griffin (9), daughter of H. M. and Sarah M. 
(Porte) Griffin, born July 1, 1879, is an honor graduate of Mc- 
Gill University, Montreal ; married, June 29, 1907, James Patrick 
MacGregor, barrister, of Toronto. She takes an active part in 
the work of several organizations engaged in charitable and social 
welfare work in Toronto; has been President of the Ladies 7 
University Alumni Association and of other useful societies. She 
was a member of the committee of ladies who waited upon 
the Premier of Ontario and procured the appointment of a 
Woman Judge for Toronto Police Court. 



621 

Constance Marion Griffin (9), daughter of Charles and 
Amelia P. (Ecclestone) Griffin, born Dec. 14, 1883, in Hamilton, 
Ont. ; married Dec. 29, 1906, Harold Harmer. They resided in 
the Province of Saskatchewan several years, but now have their 
home in Outremont, Montreal, P. Quebec. 

ICIHILDRE'N: 

724 — Robert Griffin, b. in Regina, Sask., Dec. 16, 1907. 

725 — Constance Vivian, b. in Prov. of Saskatchewan, April 
4, 1909. 



124 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



623 

George Campbell Griffin, O. L. S. and C. E. (9), son of George 
A. and Maude (Porte) Griffin, was born April 29, 1895, in Guelph, 
Ont. When the War of 1914-18 broke out he was a student in 
Surveying and Civil Engineering. He enlisted in the Canadian 
Expeditionary force and served till the end of the war. On his 
return to Canada he completed his professional course, received 
his degree and is now practising his profession in Toronto. 

628 

William Eric Griffin (9), eldest son of Dr. Herbert S. and 
Edith M. (Robinson) Griffin, was born in Hamilton, Ont., Sept. 
25, 1896 ; was an officer of Engineers in the Canadian Expedition- 
ary Force in France, where he won the Military Cross. Since his 
return he has completed his law course, been admitted to the 
bar, and is now practising his profession in Hamilton. 

629 

Howard Stanley, C. E. (9), second son of Dr. Herbert S. and 
Edith M. (Robinson) Griffin, was born in Hamilton, August 9, 
1899; was educated in Hamilton public schools and Queen’s Uni- 
versity, Kingston. 



661 

Curtis William Griffin (9), son of Ransom M. and Sarah 
(Tanner) Griffin, born in Smithville, Ont., Nov. 20, 1882; mar- 
ried Miss Irene O’Connor, Jan. 8, 1914. 

(CHILDREN: 

726 — Rose Mary Kathryn, b. Nov. 13, 1914. 

727 — Merritt Terence, b. April 20, 1916. 

728 — Margaret Elizabeth, b. April 30, 1918. 




GEORGE CAMPBELL GRIFFIN 

In Overseas Forces. 

(See No. 623) 




A PIONEER FAMILY 



125 



672 

Ernest Archibald Griffin (9), son s of George Lee and Lucinda 
Maria (Davis) Griffin, born March 2, 1888. He married Char- 
lotte Pearl Middaugh, of Smithville, Jan. 12, 1916. 

CHILDREN : 

729 — Freida Maxine, born in 1916. 

730 — Norma Pearl, born in 1918. 

673 

Florence Mildred Griffin (9), daughter of George L. and 
Helen A. (Roberts) Griffin, was born July 28, 1890; married 
Franklin J. Rinker, of Gainsborough Township, Nov. 11, 1911. 

CHILDREN: 

731 — Helen W. Gertrude, b. April 12, 1914. 

732 — Radford Lee. 

674 

Grace Helen Griffin (9), daughter of George Lee and Helen 
A. (Roberts) Griffin, born Jan. 4, 1894; married Ira Irwin Jeffery, 
Jan. 4, 1916. 

CHILDREN: 

733 — George Chancey, b. Oct. 11, 1917. 

734 — Roy Neil, b. April 7, 1920. 

538 

Mary Margarita Griffin (8), daughter of James Nelson and 
Eleanor Jane (Roszel) Griffin, was born Jan. 4, 1874; m. John 
Smoke (or Smuck) of Waterdown. They now (1924) live on 
their farm near Freeman, Ont. 



126 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



CHILDREN: 

735 — James Isaac, b. Oct. 11, 1896. 

736 — Marjorie Catharine, b. Nov. 26, 1900. 

737— Alga Clare, b. July 29, 1902. 

738 — Ency Edith, b. June 11, 1907. 

SCHOOL TEACHERS. 

In possession of the Wentworth Historical Society is the 
minute book of Wentworth County School Board, with lists of 
teachers appointed or approved by that Board. I find that a 
great number of these teachers were Griffins of our family and 
probably other descendants of Richard of Smith ville bearing 
other names are there. Most of these teachers only taught dur- 
ing a short time and later chose other occupations. The records 
of other counties perhaps contain similar statements. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



127 



RELATED FAMILIES. 

GRIFFIN FAMILIES IN CANADA RELATED TO BUT NOT DESCENDED 
FROM RICHARD, OF SMITHVILLE, ONT. 

38 

Thomas Griffin (5), third son of Edward and Millicent 
(Bishop) Griffin, and a brother of Richard Griffin, of Smith ville, 
was born Feb. 6, 1741. He was given a commission as an officer 
in a loyal regiment during the American War of the Revolution. 
He was captured by the rebels and imprisoned at Albany, N. Y., 
with many other loyalists, some of them his relatives. He was 
sentenced by the so-called Committee of Safety to be hanged for 
the crime of accepting a commission in the loyal forces. When 
the jailor announced to him that he was to be hanged the next 
day, he said: “The man who will hang me is not born.” He 
then knocked down the jailor with his handcuffs, secured his 
keys, then liberated himself and his loyal companions. He and 
his brother Obadiah escaped to Nova Scotia. Joseph Griffin, 
probably a cousin, settled in or near Montreal, Canada; nothing 
further about him is known to me except that he gave evidence 
before the Royal Commission on Compensation to the Loyalists. 
He there testified to certain claimants having been in Albany 
jail. Thomas and Obadiah were each awarded farming land and 
a town lot in the new town of St. John, as is recorded in the 
Government archives. Thomas married a Miss Harris, of Corn- 
wallis, and they had thirteen children, eight sons and five daught- 
ers. From his grandson, T. H. Griffin, who at the time I heard 
from him, in 1891, was President of The Canada Electrical Co., 
of Amherst, N. S., I learned the names of the sons, but not of 
the daughters. He was much interested in the history and prom- 
ised to get more information for me from relatives in Cornwallis 
and in Boston, many of the family having migrated to the latter 



128 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



city. I wrote to him for further information but never received 
any replies. 

CHILDREN: 

739 — James. 

740 — Eli. 

741 — Thomas. 

742 — Elisha. 

743 — Samuel. 

744 — Daniel. 

745 — John. 

746 — Chipman. 

and five daughters. 



39 

Obadiah Griffin (5), son of Edward and Millicent (Bishop) 
Griffin, born March 9, 1743, escaped from Albany Jail with his 
brother Thomas and others and made his way to Nova Scotia, 
where he received farm land, also a town lot in St. John, accord- 
ing to records preserved in the Province of New Brunswick, 
which was at that time part of the Province of Nova Scotia. He 
married, but the name of his wife I have not learned, nor the 
number of children, though tradition says there were several. 
I have obtained particulars regarding his eldest son. 

747 — Obadiah, born in 1777, probably in Duchess Co., N. Y. 

The late Solomon Griffin (6) related to me the following 
story : 

“One day near the close of the war of 1812 I was on the ver- 
andah with father, who was home on furlough and had a lame 
back, when we saw an old man coming along the road ; he turned 
in at the gate and came up to the house and greeted us with the 
question : 




ELEANOR (FIELD) HILL, NATHANIEL HILL 

(See No. 77) 




A PIONEER FAMILY 



129 



" ‘Is your name Griffin?’ Father admitted the fact. 

" 'Well, how are you, anyway?’ 

" 'Oh, not so bad, except a lame back.’ 

" 'That’s an old Griffin complaint. Say, did you have an 
Uncle Obie in New York?’ 

" 'Yes, I did.’ 

" 'Well, I am he.” 

"Then he said that he had just arrived from Nova Scotia, 
looking for a better country, and that his family were coming on 
behind.” 

Solomon was only a small boy then and in his old age did 
not remember very much about the family, but from one of the 
grandsons of Obadiah, Rev. Jacob Griffin, I obtained the infor- 
mation which follows. He could not say whether his father had 
any brothers or sisters, nor did he remember his grandmother’s 
name. I give what he gave me. 



747 

Obadiah Griffin (6), son of Obadiah Griffin (5), was born in 
1777 ; he married Hannah McIntyre, and removed from Nova 
Scotia to Canada West in or about 1814. He remained about a 
year among his relatives and then located in the Talbot settle- 
ment, County of Elgin, where he died at the age of 94. Mrs. 
Hannah McIntyre Griffin was aged 93 at her death. 

(Children : 

748 — Samuel, b. 1799, in Nova Scotia; had no children; 
adopted two. 

749 — Martha, b. 1801, in Nova Scotia; m. George Wilcox. 

750 — Elizabeth, b. 1803, in Nova Scotia; m. Daniel Hubbard. 

751 — Abraham, b. 1805, in Nova Scotia; m.EIiza Young. 

752 — Christianna, b. 1807, in Nova Scotia; m. Rufus Lumly. 



9 



130 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



753 — James, b. 1809, in Nova Scotia; m. Sarah Lumly. 

754 — Dorinda, b. 1811, in Nova Scotia; m. Eliot Young. 

755 — Stephen, b. 1813, in Nova Scotia; married twice. 

756 — Jacob, b. Nov. 5, 1815, in Smithville, Ont. 

757 — John, b. 1817, in South wold, Ont. 



750 

Elizabeth Griffin (7), daughter of Obadiah and Hannah (Mc- 
Intyre) Griffin, born in 1803, married Daniel Hubbard. They 
settled near Florence, Ont., where she died. She had nine chil- 
dren, names not learned by present writer. 



751 

Abraham Griffin (7), son of Obadiah and Hannah (McIntyre) 
Griffin, born in Nova Scotia in the year 1805. He married Eliza 
Young and removed to Iowa, where he died about 1885, at 
Cresco, Iowa. “He was a Baptist minister and is said to have 
done excellent work for the Lord.” He had eight children. 



752 

Christianna Griffin (7), daughter of Obadiah and Hannah 
(McIntyre) Griffin, born in 1807 ; married Rufus Lumley. Their 
children all settled near Wardsville, Ont. Mrs. Lumley died at 
Wardsville, Ont. 

(CHILDREN: 

758 — Sarah. 

759 — Hannah. 

760 — Elijah. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



131 



753 

James Griffin (7), son of Obadiah and Hannah (McIntyre) 
Griffin, born in 1809 ; married Sarah Lumley in 1832. He was a 
farmer, and all his sons were farmers; their names were all for- 
gotten by their uncle. James died at Dunwich, Ont. He had 
eight children. 

754 

Dorinda Griffin (7), daughter of Obadiah and Hannah (Mc- 
Intyre) Griffin, born in 1911 ; married Eliot Young. She died 
at Dunwich, Ont. 

CHILDREN: 

761 — Nancy. 

762 — Eliza. 

763 — Sarah. 

7 64 — J ames. 

765— John. 

766 — Daniel. 

755 

Stephen Griffin (7), son of Obadiah and Hannah (McIntyre) 
Griffin, born in 1813; married, first, Betsy McPherson, in 1834. 
He was a Baptist minister, commenced the work when young 
and “attained eminence as a successful preacher and was con- 
sidered one of the most talented men of the time in that part 
of the country where he lived.” 

CHILDREN: 

767 — George, was a Baptist minister, died young. 

768 — Sinus, died young. 

769 — Diana, died young. 



132 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



Stephen Griffin married, second, Margaret Gregory, in 1884. 
He died at Middlemiss, Ont., in 1893, aged 80 years. 



756 

Jacob Griffin (7), son of Obadiah and Hannah (McIntyre) 
Griffin, born at Smithville, Ont., Nov. 5, 1815; married Emaline 
Wade, Oct. 6, 1836. In 1897 was residing in Hortonville, Wis- 
consin. He was a Baptist minister, in which work he started quite 
young and endured all the hardships incident to a new country, 
among poor people. He travelled and labored in Ontario, Michi- 
gan, Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin; baptized over 700 persons 
and organized a dozen churches. His wife also engaged in the 
work and in the words of her husband “was credited with being 
the best of the two.” Of their eight children, one was a Baptist 
missionary in India, and on his return continued in the active 
work of the ministry; the others were all active in church work. 

CHILDREN: 

770 — Cynthia Cordelia, b. at Southwold, Ont., Feb. 12, 1838. 

771 — Alvinia Sevia, b. in Ogle County, 111., Dec. 9, 1840; d. at 
Southwold, Ont., May, 1842. 

772 — Zebina Flavius, b. in Ogle County, 111., Nov. 14, 1844. 

773 — Bryant Wade, b. in Ogle County, 111., July 22, 1847. 

774 — Newel Willard, b. in Ogle County, 111., Aug. 22, 1850. 

775 — Jacob Douglas, b. in Southwold, Ont., May 1, 1853. 

776 — Cassius Halem, b. in Drumbo, Ont., Oct. 27, 1857 ; d. 
March 12, 1870. 

777 — Emma Gertrude, b. in Zorra, Ont., May 23, 1860. 



757 

John Griffin (7), son of Obadiah and Hannah (McIntyre) 
Griffin, was born at Southwold, Ont., in 1817 ; married Betsy Van 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



133 



Selsar. He was a blacksmith by trade. He died at Salem, Ont., 
in 1890. 



CHILDREN: 

778 — Obadiah, was living in Houghton, Ont., in 1897. 

779 — Susan Jane, married Eugene Hill, a miller. 

780 — Sarah Ann, married Jabez Cahoon. 

781— John. 



770 

Cynthia Cordelia Griffin (8), daughter of Rev. Jacob and 
Emaline (Wade) Griffin, b. at Southwold, Ont., Sept. 12, 1838; 
married George Pembleton in 1855; was residing in Hortonville, 
Wis., in 1890. 

CHILDREN : 

782 — Rosetta, b. at Drumbo, Ont., Aug., 1856 ; d. Sept., 1857. 

783 — Theresa, b. at Drumbo, Ont., Dec. 2, 1857. 

784 — William Edwin, b. at Drumbo, Ont., Jan. 24, 1860, is a 
medical doctor at Wittenburg, Wis. 

785 — Inez Alberta, b. at Drumbo, Aug. 8, 1862; m. Gilford 
Gallen in 1883. 

786 — Bryant Griffin, b. at Drumbo, June, 1865; school teacher, 
Hortonville, Ont. 

787 — Frank, b. at Allenville, Wis., 1870; d. in 1870. 



772 

Zebina Flavius Griffin (8), son of Rev. Jacob and Emaline 
(Wade) Griffin, born in Town of Byron, Ogle County, 111., Nov. 
14, 1844; married, first, Mary Gertrude Harwood, daughter of a 
prosperous farmer in East Zorra, Oxford County, Ont., July 20, 
1865. 



134 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



'CHILDREN : 

788 — Bessie Maud, b. at East Zorra, April 10, 1867 ; m. Elmer 
Bryant, Aug. 27, 1890. He died May 11, 1892. 

789 — Mabel Lucy, b. at Vineland, Wis., Dec. 18, 1869; m. 
Jan. 19, 1891, at Midnapore, India, George Henderson, a mission- 
ary. 

790 — Mary Emaline, b. at Dutton, Ont., July 22, 1874; d. at 
Woodstock, Ont., Oct. 8, 1877. 

791 — Nellie Gertrude, b. at Hillsdale, Mich., Oct. 8, 1878. 

Mrs. Mary Gertrude Griffin died at Hillsdale, Michigan, Nov. 
18, 1879. On Feb. 28, 1881, at Jackson, Mich., Rev. Z. F. Griffin 
married his second wife, Susan Libbie Cilley, daughter of Rev. 
E. G. Cilley. In 1873 Miss Cilley went to India as a missionary 
under the Free Baptist Missionary Society. She returned and 
became a student at Hillsdale College. She and the Rev. Z. B. 
Griffin were both graduates of that College in the class of 1881. 
They sailed from New York for India Oct. 20, 1883, under ap- 
pointment of the American Free Baptist Board, and arrived at 
Calcutta, India, Dec. 31, 1883. They worked in Bengal ten years 
and then returning arrived in Boston May 15, 1893. For two 
years Rev. Z. F. Griffin acted as Field Secretary of the Foreign 
Missionary Society, after which he accepted the pastorate of the 
Free Baptist Church at Elmira Heights, N. Y. He wrote and 
published a book entitled “ India and Daily Life in Bengal,” of 
which the present writer has a copy in his library and values as 
deeply interesting and marvellously concise. 

CHILDREN : 

792 — Frankie, b. at Gilbert’s Mills, N. Y., June 7, 1882. 

793 — Bryant Wade, b. at Balsadore, India, May 17, 1885. 

794 — Mona Ruth Hunt, b. at Balsadore, India, June 27, 1887. 

773 

Bryant Wade Griffin (8), son of Rev. Jacob and Emaline 
( Wade) Griffin, was born in Boone Co., Ills., July 22, 1847. He be- 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



135 



came a lawyer and is said to have been possessed of much ability. 
He died Jan., 1875, at Vinton, Iowa, aged 28. 



774 

Newel Willard Griffin (8), son of Rev. Jacob and Emaline 
(Wade) Griffin, was born in Boone Co., Ills., Aug. 22, 1850. He 
married Eugenia Edmonds in 1876. In 1897 he was a merchant 
in Norman, Oklahoma. 

CHILDREN: 

795 — Wade Hampton, b. at Gordon, Texas, in 1877. 

796 — Edward, b. at Gordon, Texas, in 1879. 

797 — Walter Bell, b. at Gordon, Texas, in 1881. 

798 — Hattie, b. at Gordon, Texas, in 1883. 

799 — Nina, b. at Gordon, Texas, in 1885. 

800 — Myrtle, b. at Gordon, Texas, in 1888. 

777 

Emma Gertrude Griffin (8), daughter of Rev. Jacob and 
Emaline (Wade) Griffin, b. May 23, 1863, at Zorra, Ont. ; married 
Samuel Freeman Briggs, Sept. 16, 1882. In 1897 they were living- 
in Hortonville, Wis. 

CHILDREN: 

801 — Harry Douglas, b. Nov. 8, 1884, at Hortonville, Wis. 

802 — Estelle, b. July 1, 1888, at Hortonville, Wis. 

783 

Theresa Pembleton (9), daughter of George and Cynthia C. 
(Griffin) Pembleton, was born Dec. 2, 1857 ; married Henry 
Kitchen in 1880. They were living in St. George, Out., in 1897. 
They had two children. 



136 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



803 

Simon Griffin served in the Lincoln Militia in the war of 
1812-14 in the battle of Lundy’s Lane and other engagements, 
and after the war received two hundred acres in the township 
of Malahide for his services. Very little is now known of his 
previous history except that he was born in New Brunswick 
about 1784, and married there Mary (or Polly) Saunders, and 
migrated to this province ; also that he was related to the 
Griffins of Smithville. A granddaughter, Mrs. Campbell, stated 
that he was an only son and had a sister who married John Hall, 
of N. B. It appears to me very probable that instead of being 
an only son he was the second son of Obadiah, and came to this 
province with or shortly before him. He died about 1824, aged 40. 

CHILDREN: 

804 — Joseph, died young, aged about 20. 

805 — Edward, twice married, had three children by first 
wife and six by the second. 

806 — Sarah, married Jacob Esselstine, had eleven children. 

807 — David, married Miss Feazie. 

808 — Olive, married William Lyons, had four children. 

809 — John, married and had two children, died in 1900. 

810 — Saunders, had four children. 

811 — Zebulon, went to California; nothing more known of 

him. 



807 

David Griffin, son of Simon and Mary (Saunders) Griffin, 
married Miss Feazie. 

CHILDREN: 

812— Albert, b. 1843. 

813— William, b. Feb. 4, 1845. 

814 — Rebecca, married a Mr. Campbell. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



137 



810 

Saunders, son of Simon and Mary (Saunders) Griffin, mar- 
ried and had two sons and two daughters. He was accidentally 
killed at Port Burwell. 

CHILDREN: 

815 — Alvin. 

816 — Madison. 

and two daughters — names not learned. 

813 

William Griffin, son of David and (Feazie) Griffin, was 

born Feb. 4, 1845 ; married Oct. 19, 1869, Miranda Lounsbury, 
who was born Aug. 17, 1851. They settled on a farm in the 
Township of Caistor, where they raised their family and still 
reside. 

CHILDREN: 

817 — Mary E., b. June 9, 1871 ; m. Lavel Lounsbury, 1897. 

818 — Survilla, b. Jan. 27, 1873; died young. 

819 — Ira, b. July 18, 1876 ; m. Mattie Beemer, 1906. 

820 — Iva Lorena, b. July 27, 1881 ; m. J. E. Bolton, of Wind- 
sor, 1903. 

821 — Cora, b. July 22, 1883; m. Bruce Greer, 1906. 

822 — Etta, b. Aug. 18, 1885; m. Wm. Beemer, 1910. 

823 

Caleb Griffin, said to have been born on Long Island, N. Y., 
and who went to Nova Scotia at or near the close of the Revolu- 
tionary War, was probably a grandson or great-grandson of 
John Griffin (2), son of Edward Griffin (1), of Flushing, Long- 
Island. John had a son Caleb, born about 1701, and mention is 



138 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



found of several grandsons of that name. Joseph was also a 
common name in that branch of the family* as it is in the Nova 
Scotia family. I learned something of this family from my 
father, who was well acquainted with the late John Griffin, of 
Georgetown, but most of the following particulars were contained 
in a letter from Anthony Griffin, of Alma, Ont., to his brother 
at St. Thomas, in 1889, the latter immediately forwarded it to me. 
He said his father remembered an Obadiah Griffin. 



824 

Joseph Griffin, son of Caleb, was born Jan. 13, 1784, and 
came from Nova Scotia nearly one hundred years ago. He mar- 
ried Hannah Taylor, who was born March 30, 1781. He died 
in the County of Halton March 12th, 1858, and she died May 9, 
1862. Their children were all born in Nova Scotia. 

CHILDREN: 

825— William, b. 1808. 

826 — John, b. 1810; died in Georgetown, Ont., in 1891. 

827 — Michael Taylor, b. Nov. 29, 1812. 

828— Ann, b. 1814. 

829— Phoebe, b. 1816. 

830 — Caleb, b. in or about 1818. 

831 — Anthony, b. Dec. 23, 1820; drowned at Port Stanley, 
June 21, 1843. 



827 

Michael Taylor Griffin, son of Joseph and Hannah (Taylor) 
Griffin, born in Nova Scotia Nov. 29, 1812 ; married Sept. 3, 1834, 
Sophia Jackson. He died Sept. 29, 1889, and Mrs. Hannah Griffin 
died Dec. 5, 1877. Their children were all born in Esquesing, 
County of Halton. 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



139 



CHILDREN: 

832 — Hannah, b. Sept. 18, 1835 ; died young. 

833 — Elizabeth, b. Feb. 12, 1837. 

834 — Joseph, b. Feb. 7, 1839. 

835 — Mary Jane, b. Dec. 14, 1840. 

836— William, b. Jan. 5, 1843. 

837 — Anthony, b. April 1, 1845. 

838— Amos, b. March 25, 1847 ; d. April 23, 1862. 

839— Robert, b. Jan. 13, 1849 ; d. Feb. 15, 1849. 

840— John, b. Jan. 13, 1849 ; d. March 9, 1849. 

841 — Sophia Anne, b. Jan. 19, 1850. 

842 — David Henry, b. March 18, 1853. 

843 — Michael, b. June 4, 1855. 

844 — James Young, b. Oct. 28, 1857. 

There are many prosperous and respected members of this 
section of the Griffin family in the counties of Halton, Welling- 
ton and Elgin, in the cities of St. Thomas, Winnipeg and else- 
where at the present time (1924). 

There are other Griffin families in Canada, who are descend- 
ants of Edward, of Flushing, but I have not been able to learn 
particulars regarding them which would be of much use in this 
volume. 



140 



MEMORANDUM 



MEMORANDUM 



141 



142 



MEMORANDUM 



MEMORANDUM 



143 



144 



MEMORANDUM 



INDEX I 



NAMES 



BORN A 

1760 Abraham 

1798 Abraham 

1797 Abraham Culp 

1826 Abraham 

1830 Abraham 

1854 Abram Binkley ..... 

1805 Abraham ............... 

1705 Adam 

1854 Ada Byron 

1805 Absalom 

1855 Albert Dyke 

1854 Albert B 

1881 Albert 

1843 Albert 

1877 Aletta Victoria 

1883 Alethia Eleanor ... 

Alfred 

1819 Alanson 

1860 Alice Eleanor 

1880 Alice Gertrude ..... 

1883 Alice J 

1911 Allan Douglas 

Allen 

Allen 

1884 Alma 

1852 Alonzo Franklin .. 
1857 Alvaretta Pauline. 

1832 Alvin Torry 

1871 Alvin Douglas 

Alvin 

1840 Alvinia Sevia 



GRIFFINS. 



BORN 


'No. 




Amanda Mellissa ... 


... 402 


1758 


Amelia 


... 46 


1847 


Amos 


... 838 


1746 


Amy 


... 40 


1901 


Annie Edna 


... 680 


1814 


Ann 


... 828 


1847 


Annie Elizabeth, ..... 


... 387 


1821 


Anne Elizabeth 


... 717 


1848 


Ann Eliza 


... 480 


1820 


Anthony 


... 831 


1845 


Anthony 


... 837 


1863 


Ariel F 


... 283 


1849 


Arthur 


... 272 


1864 


Arthur C 


... 432 


1867 


Arthur Egerton ..... 


... 549 


1893 


Arthur F. 


... 520 


1858 


Arthur Kent 


... 474 


1893 


Arthur Kent 


... 616 


1878 


Arthur Lionel 


... 608 


1847 


Augusta 


... 240 




B 




1830 


Baldwin 


... 166 


1912 


Barbara 


... 715 


1919 


Barbara Taylor 


... 712 




Benjamin 


... 10 


1881 


Bertha Acheson 


... 617 


1881 


Bertha May 


... 542 


1867 


Bessie Maud 


... 788 


1762 


Bethiah 


... 48 


1917 


Betty Ilopkinson ... 


... 710 



OF 

No. 

47 

58 

128 

150 

153 

427 

751 

17 

243 

116 

473 

406 

454 

812 

540 

543 

397 

120 

475 

600 

582 

667 

174 

200 

441 

418 

244 

126 

489 

815 

771 



146 



NAMES OF GRIFFINS 



BORN 

1734 Bridget 

Bridget Ann 

1847 Bryant Wade 

1885 Bryant Wade 

1828 Burwell 

1869 Burwell 

C 

Caleb 

Caleb 

1818 Caleb 

1837 Caroline 

1843 Caroline Amelia 

1846 Caroline Augusta 

C. A 

1857 Cassius Halem 

1812 Catharine 

Catharine 

Catherine 

Catharine 

Catharine 

Catharine 

1839 Charles Wesley 

1843 Charles 

1862 Charles Adelbert 

1888 Charles Ernest 

1900 Charles Earl 

1856 Charles Henry 

1885 Charlie 

1829 Charlotte 

1856 Charlotte Jane 

1868 Chester Ernest 

1800 Chipman 

Christina 

1807 Christianna 

1860 Clara B 

Clara Celista 

1850 Colborne Nellis 

1849 Columbus 

1883 Constance Marion 

1831 Content 

1883 Cora 

1916 Culver Hopkinson .... 



BORN No. 

1856 Curtis James 536 

1882 Curtis William 661 

1838 Cynthia Cordelia 770 

1913 Cynthia Howard 626 

1824 Cyrus Ryerson 122 

1849 Cyrus Smith 232 

1896 Cyrus Stanley 523 

D 

1824 Danford 163 

Daniel 82 

Daniel * 744 

1797 David 103 

1809 David 133 

David 175 

David 202 

David 211 

David 807 

1871 David Harley 550 

1853 David Henry 842 

Deborah 5 

Deborah 24 

1835 Deborah 169 

Deborah 396 

1880 Delilah 440 

1920 Derek Powell 720 

Diana 769 

1811 Dorinda 754 

1913 Doris Eileen 693 

1815 Douglas 118 

E 

1800 Ebenezer Culver 113 

1849 Ebenezer Franklin .... 213 

1894 Edna Alice 524 

1863 Edith Adelaide 476 

1860 Edmund Alvin 287 

1603 Edward 1 

Edward 2 

Edward 6 

1710 Edward 27 

1764 Edward 49 

1801 Edward 59 



No. 

35 

210 

773 

793 

207 

434 

15 

823 

830 

256 

238 

468 

260 

776 

64 

85 

177 

184 

209 

394 

257 

270 

548 

545 

597 

483 

579 

262 

235 

488 

746 

94 

748 

282 

403 

278 

241 

621 

125 

821 

711 



NAMES OF GRIFFINS 



147 



BORN 

Edward 

1879 Edward 

Edward 

1848 Edwin Culver 

1829 Egerton Ryerson 

1853 Eleanor Catharine .... 

1831 Eleapor Rebecca L. 

Elgih 

Elida 

Eli 

Elisha 

1835 Eliza 

Eliza 

1842 Eliza Augusta 

1824 Eliza Jane 

1841 Eliza Jane 

1859 Eliza Jane 

Elizabeth 

1752 Elizabeth 

1776 Elizabeth 

1801 Elizabeth 

1803 Elizabeth 

Elizabeth 

Elizabeth 

1835 Elizabeth Olivia 

1863 Elizabeth M. W 

1899 Elizabeth 

1837 Elizabeth 

1851 Emma Ann 

1853 Emma Aletta 

1860 Emma Gertrude 

1834 Emily 

1917 Emily Allison 

1906 Ena Delilah 

Enos 

1888 Ernest Archibald 

1882 Ernest Chester 

1919 Estella Hope 

1885 Esther Maude 

1887 Ethel Cora 

1887 Ethal Rualine 

1885 Etta 

1911 Eugene 

1872 Ellis Eugene 



BORN 


No. 


1896 


Eva Lena 


.. 681 


1919 


Evelyn 


.. 653 


1904 


Evelyn Mabel 


.. 664 




Ezekiel 


.. 18 




F 




1801 


Fanny 


.. 105 


1858 


Florence E 


.. 429 


1889 


Florence A 


.. 583 


1890 


Florence Mildred .... 


.. 677 


1904 


Flossie Pearl 


.. 685 


1803 


Frances 


.. 130 


1854 


Frances Leonard ...... 


.. 275 


1904 


Francis 


.. 593 


1833 


Franklin Metcalf .... 


.. 254 




Frank 


.. 585 


1882 


Frank F 


.. 609 


1885 


Frank Burwell 


.. 675 


1882 


Frankie 


.. 792 


1853 


Frederick Thomas .. 


.. 472 


1875 


Fred 


.. 438 


1884 


Frederick 


.. 611 


1913 


Frederick Kent 


.. 716 


1919 


Frederick Dyke ...... 


.. 719 


1916 


Freida Maxine 


.. 729 




G 




1893 


Geoffrey Cameron.... 


.. 614 


1812 


George 


.. 134 




George 


.. 226 


1824 


George Douglas 


.. 250 


1833 


George Erastus 


.. 299 




George H 


.. 400 


1871 


George 


.. 435 


1863 


George Alexander.... 


.. 486 


1858 


George Lee 


.. 546 


1895 


George Campbell .... 


.. 623 


1907 


George Burwell 


.. 666 


1897 


George Norris 


.. 682 




George 


.. 767 


1891 


Georgia Burt 


.. 523 


1889 


Gerald Hamilton 


.. 610 


1919 


Gerald Ross 


.. 690 



No. 

83 

796 

805 

469 

252 

242 

253 

193 

189 

740 

742 

265 

392 

258 

149 

171 

407 

13 

43 

55 

114 

183 

230 

261 

267 

277 

595 

833 

233 

482 

777 

168 

718 

665 

231 

676 

620 

668 

532 

544 

533 

822 

594 

417 



148 



NAMES OF GRIFFINS 



BORN 

1755 Gershom 

Gilbert 

1923 Gordon Trevor 

1897 Grace H 

1879 Grace Lillian 

1894 Grace Helen 

H 

1835 Hannah 

1831 Hannibal Rathbun .... 

1884 Harold Alvin 

1890 Harold Hopkinson .... 

1895 Harold Leslie 

1897 Harold 

1837 Harriet Victoria 

1858 Harriet Augusta 

Harriet 

1850 Harriet Sarah 

1858 Harriet A 

1862 Harriet Adeline 

1865 Harriet Annie 

Harriet 

1883 Hattie 

1865 Helen A 

1871 Helen Mabel 

1807 Henry 

1844 Henry Augustus 

1887 Henry Pearl 

1885 Henry Launcelot 

1854 Herbert Spohn 

1902 Herbert Kent 

1849 Horatio Milford 

1900 Howard E 

1899 Howard Stanley 

1826 Huldah 

I 

1858 Ida Emily 

1863 Ira Stuart 

1876 Ira 

Isaac 

1802 Isaac 

1803 Isaac 



BORN No. 

Isaac Smith 173 

Isabel 223 

Isaiah 32 

1738 Isaiah 37 

1771 Isaiah 52 

1881 Iva Lorena 820 

J 

1879 James Morey 541 

1885 James Edwin 602 

1911 James Arthur 688 

James 739 

1809 James 753 

1857 James Young 844 

1851 Jane E 279 

1840 Jane 385 

1901 Jean 596 

1899 Jean 624 

1913 Jean Catharine 689 

1917 Jean Railton 695 

1922 Jean Hamilton 714 

1803 Jemima 60 

1898 Jessie Edith 679 

Jonas 191 

John ; 3 

John 9 

John 95 

1858 Jackson Columbus .... 236 

1703 Jacob 16 

1816 Jacob 86 

Jacob 90 

Jacob 192 

1828 Jacob Anson 297 

Jacob 398 

1815 Jacob 756 

1853 Jacob Douglas 775 

Jacob Ira 660 

James 29 

1803 James 147 

James 176 

James 203 

James 212 

James .& 225 

1850 James Edward 183 



No. 

44 

30 

722 

521 

619 

678 

832 

266 

529 

603 

559 

663 

127 

179 

187 

273 

281 

288 

289 

399 

798 

284 

476 

117 

259 

576 

608 

490 

630 

481 

522 

629 

164 

484 

535 

819 

11 

80 

106 



NAMES OF GRIFFINS 



149 



BORN 

1823 James Kent 

1830 James Nelson 

1842 James Harvey 

1867 James Percival ... 

1849 John Wesley 

John Wesley 

John Wesley 

John 

1860 John A 

1865 John Williams ..... 

1866 John W 

1903 John Porte 

1906 John Douglas M. 

John 

1817 John 

John 

John 

1810 John 

1849 John 

1708 Jonathan 

1759 Jonathan 

1774 Jonathan 

1821 Jonathan Wesley 

Joseph 

Joseph 

Joseph 

Joseph 

1784 Joseph 

1839 Joseph 

1870 Josephine Brock . 
1849 Josephine Maria . 

Joshua 

1842 Juliet 

1846 Justus Alonzo 

K 

1828 Kelly 

L 

1800 Laney 

1836 Lorenzo 

1854 Louisa Jane 

1858 Lorenzo D 

1881 Lome 



BORN m No. 

1877 Mabel E 439 

1869 Mabel Lucy 789 

1915 Madeline Constance.. 709 

Madison 816 

1807 Margaret 132 

1844 Margaret Ann 172 

1860 Margaret 491 

1918 Margaret Elizabeth.... 728 

Maria A 149 

1847 Maria 271 

1837 Maria Louisa 268 

1881 Maria Elena 551 

1856 Marian .„{* 286 

1887 Marian Louise 613 

1826 Martha Ann 123 

Martha 201 

1833 Martha Ann 264 

1801 Martha 749 

Mary 7 

Mary 14 

Mary 23 

1778 Mary 56 

1808 Mary 62 

Mary 93 

1795 Mary 102 

1803 Mary 115 

1805 Mary 131 

1832 Mary 167 

Mary 186 

Mary 206 

Mary 229 

1835 Mary Eleanor 300 

1853 Mary E. 280 

1873 Mary 437 

Mary 494 

1870 Mary Agnes 504 

1874 Mary Margarita 538 

1882 Mary Josephine 601 

Mary E 659 

1874 Mary Emaline 790 

1871 Mary E 817 

1840 Mary Jane 835 

Matilda 188 



No. 

249 

298 

386 

477 

154 

190 

408 

393 

425 

.487 

433 

625 

631 

745 

757 

781 

809 

826 

840 

26 

45 

54 

88 

12 

31 

78 

804 

824 

834 

248 

470 

25 

178 

479 

165 

129 

198 

419 

424 

416 



150 



NAMES OF GRIFFINS 



BORN 

1857 Matilda 

1861 Melbourne Scott 

1916 Merritt Terence 

1812 Michael Taylor 

1855 Michael 

1817 Minerva 

1859 Minnie Brant 

Miriam 

1749 Miriam 

1768 Miriam 

1887 Mona Ruth Hunt 

1823 Morrell 

1888 Myrtle 

N 

1917 Nancy Bovell 

1921 Natalie L’Ho'mmedieu 
1766 Nathaniel 

Nathaniel 

1799 Nathaniel 

Nellie Victoria 

Nellie 

1878 Nellie Gertrude 

1850 Newel Willard 

1885 Nina 

1893 Nora 

1918 Norma Pearl 

O 

Obadiah 

1743 Obadiah 

1777 Obadiah 

Obadiah 

Olive Alicia 

Olive 

1875 Orley Burgess 

Ormond ...t 

1831 Orrin 

P 

1819 Parmela 

Percy 

1862 Peter F 

Peter Johnson 



BORN 


No. 


1884 


Philo 


578 


1834 


Phoebe Jane 


197 


1816 


Phoebe 


829 


1922 


Phyllis Elizabeth 


721 


1836 


Priscilla 


384 




R 




1850 


Rachael Eleanor 


269 


1831 


Ransom C 


263 


1855 


Ransom L 


422 


1859 


Ransom Merritt 


537 




Rebecca 


814 


1909 


Reta Mildred 


687 




Richard 


4 




Richard 


22 


1732 


Richard 


34 


1780 


Richard 


57 


1809 


Richard 


63 




Richard 


84 




Richard 


91 


1805 


Richard 


148 


1849 


Robert 


839 


1811 


Robert Allen 


110 


1837 


Robert A 


199 


1866 


Robert Edmund Lee.. 


247 


1856 


Robert W 


276 


1873 


Robert C 


436 


1889 


Robert Harry 


581 


1894 


Roger Newton 


604 


1914 


Rose Mary Kathryn.. 


726 


1815 


Roy 


65 


1889 


Royden Trevor W 


534 


1882 


Ruby Catharine 


530 


1907 


Ruby Eleanor 


686 


1885 


Ruth Moore 


618 


1903 


Ruth Evelyn 


691 




S 




1899 


Sadie Marie 


683 




Samuel 


20 


1829 


Samuel Stewart 


124 




Samuel 


743 


1799 


Samuel 


748 




Sarah 


21 



No. 

420 

246 

727 

827 

843 

119 

245 

33 

42 

51 

794 

89 

800 

627 

713 

50 

92 

104 

405 

499 

791 

774 

799 

622 

730 

28 

39 

747 

778 

401 

808 

539 

584 

152 

87 

587 

431 

227 



NAMES OF ORIFFTNS 



151 



BORN 

1809 $arah 

Sarah Ann 

Sarah 

Saunders 

Sinus 

1850 Sophia Jane 

1748 Sarah 

Sarah 

1831 Sarah 

1853 Sarah Catharine 

1856 Sardenia 

1845 Serina Matilda 

1892 Selwyn Powell 

1772 Smith 

1800 Smith 

1814 Smith Culp 

Smith Edward 

1805 Solomon 

Solomon 

Sophronia 

1872 Stella L 

1806 Stephen 

1736 Susanna 

1807 Susannah 

Susan 

Susan Jane 

1873 Survilla 

1822 Sutherland Douglas.. 

T 

1884 Theresa Susan 

1741 Thomas r 

1829 Thomas I. 

Thomas 

1829 Timothy 

y 

1906 Vera Theresa 



BORN W No. 

1877 Wade, Hampton 795 

1852 Walter H 274 

1892 Walter TI 519 

Walter 586 

1881 Walter Bell 797 

1915 Ward Harley 694 

1835 Watson Ebenezer 255 

1860 Watson 485 

1856 Wellington S 428 

1847 Wesley 180 

1867 Wesley E 285 

1851 Wilhelmina Ellis 471 

William 19 

William 81 

1817 William Henry 112 

1837 William Murray 170 

1827 William Ryerson 195 

William 205 

1861 William Oscar 237 

1826 William Smith 251 

1849 W. Nelson 181 

1869 William Watson 290 

William 395 

William Smith 409 

1859 William Henry 421 

1860 William 0 430 

1855 William 491 

1860 William S 547 

1896 William Eric 628 

1901 William Clarence 684 

1845 William 813 

1808 William 825 

1843 William 836 

Z 

1844 Zebina Flavius 772 

Zebulon 811 

Zaidee 498 



No. 

109 

780 

806 

810 

768 

841 

41 

204 

208 

234 

423 

239 

611 

53 

79 

111 

404 

107 

224 

228 

426 

61 

36 

108 

185 

779 

818 

121 

662 

38 

196 

737 

151 

692 



1906 Wilfred Lome . 
1908 Walter Edmund 



569 

570 



INDEX II 



NAMES OF THOSE CONNECTED BY 
MARRIAGE. 



MARRIED. A No. 

1880 Acheson, Sara 479 

1827 Ackard, Mehitable .... 148 

Adams, Catharine 86 

Adams, Henry 164 

1818 Adams, Sarah 104 

1833 Atkinson, Alice 196 

B 

Ballentine, Thos 440 

Barnes, Deborah 2 

Barolf, Kathleen 614 

Bartlett, George T 423 

Barton, Elisha 8 

Bates, 234 

Beal, William 315 

Beam, Elizabeth 50 

Bell, Nathaniel 508 

1905 Berry, Dr. N. L 606 

Bessy, Alonzo 364 

Bigger, Hannah 251 

Binkley, Delilah 207 

Bishop, Millicent 27 

Bolton, J. E 820 

Bovell, Lena Beatrice 489 

1882 Brooks, Minnie K. .... 422 
Burbidge, Capt. Geo. 613 

1912 Burns, Arthur Henry 601 

1883 Burt, Ella 400 

1887 Burt, Mary Margaret 278 

Buttrum, Annie 433 



MARRIED. Q No. 

1883 Cameron, Ida 473 

Carhiff, John 394 

1883 Cams, Maggie Celista 421 

1878 Clarke, Henry 449 

Claus, Levi 197 

1891 Claus, Mary 548 

Cline, Catharine 103 

1856 Cobb, Richard 385 

Colyer, Aggie 436 

1905 Cooke, Juliana B 451 

Coon, John D 179 

Craus, 223 

Crawford, Lindsay .... 242 

Culp, Anne 138 

Culp, Elizabeth T 139 

Culp, Frances 145 

Culp, Isaac 343 

Culp, John 131 

1796 Culp, Sarah 54 

1794 Culp, Susannah 52 

1802 Culver, Annie 57 

1799 Culver, Eleanor 53 

D 

1857 Dalton, Marilla Ann.. 297 

Davidson, Ada 427 

1875 Darrow, George 239 

Davidson, Margaret.. 254 
1857 Davis, Lucinda Maria 299 

Dawes, Clara 431 

1920 Dawson, Walter 681 



NAMES OF THOSE CONNECTED BY MARRIAGE 



153 



MARRIED. 

Day, Edward 

1867 DeKalb, Mary I 

Disbrow, 

Disbrow, Mary 

Disher, Miss 

Disher, Miss 

Dixon, John 

1912 Doherty, Wm, M 

1908 Donovan, Fred C 

1814 Douglas, Harriet 

1857 Dudley, Malvina 

Durkee, 

1845 Dyke, Almira 

E 

1830 Eastman, Rachael 

Eaton, Eliza Jane 

1880 Ecclestone, Amelia 
Priscilla (Tillie).... 

Edmunds, Betsy 

1843 Ellice, Julia 

1887 Elliott, George 

1911 Errion, Claire ... f 

Early, Mary Ann 

T’ 

1914 Fraser, Meta 

1853 Freeman, Elijah 

Fuller, Carrie 

Featherston, Britannia 

Field, James 

1855 Finegin, Catharine .... 

Fisher, Robert 

Fradenburgh, Daniel 

G 

Gadsby, Amos 

1883 Gallea, Gilford 

Gale, 

Galloway, Miss 

1907 Gnaedinger, E. G 

1909 Goetz, Carrie 

Gordon, Chas. F 

1855 Gould, Susan M 



MARRIED. No. 

Gregory, Margaret .... 143 
1884 Gregory, Margaret.... 755 

1917 Gundy, Maude E 615 

H 

Haight, Susanna 4 

Hare, Mary 138 

1906 Harmer, Harold 621 

Harris, Thomas 312 

1880 Hastings-Bridge, Chas 286 
1871 Hatch, Levi Henry.... 419 

Headley, William 99 

1905 Hill, Esther 416 

1783 Hill, Solomon 48 

Hilts, Rev. Joseph 149 

Hubbard, Daniel 750 

1879 Hopkinson, Lovina..^ 469 

1846 Hurst, Mary E 88 

1840 Hurst, Margaret 89 

1911 Hutchison, May 609 

J 

James, Dr. W. T 243 

1899 Jenney, W. S 499 

Johnson, Margaret .... 110 

Johnson, 228 

Johnson, 229 

1918 Joslin, Florence C 556 

K 

Kay, Robert 494 

Kelley, Dr. Abraham 87 

1912 Kenney, James 662 

Kenny, John 167 

Kenny, John 392 

1821 Kent, Eliza 113 

1880 Kitchen, Henry 783 

L 

Lane, Elisha 403 

1854 Lawrence, Orren H 127 

Lawrence, Susan 170 

Lee, George 244 



No. 

540 

259 

7 

10 

80 

173 

340 

524 

414 

53 

255 

101 

249 

117 

111 

483 

79 

120 

283 

551 

183 

612 

264 

517 

432 

367 

124 

171 

365 

345 

785 

13 

232 

600 

496 

240 

298 



154 



NAMES OF THOSE 'CONNECTED BY MARRIAGE 



MARRIED. No. 

1848 Leonard, Martha J 121 

1915 L’Hommedieu, Cornelia 603 

Lindebnry, 55 

Lounsbury, Mary 49 

1869 Lounsbury, Miranda.. 813 

1897 Lounsbury, Lavel 817 

Lumley, Rufus 752 

1832 Lumley, Sarah 753 

Lundy, Harvey 376 



M 

1921 Mason, Leila VanZ. .. 616 
1909 Mawhinney Mary L. 512 
Meredith Abraham .. 51 



Merritt, John *.... 323 

Messeear, John 350 

1874 Montgomery, Jas 470 

Moore, John 233 

Moore, Carrie 490 

Morse, Milton Jas 300 

1908 Munro, Isabella 515 

McCallum, Mansell .... 330 
1907 MacGregor, Jas. P 619 



1798 McIntyre, Hannah .... 747 
1920 McManus, Kathleen.. 610 



1892 McNett, DeForest 269 

1834 McPherson, Betsy 755 

N 

Nellis, John 253 

1849 Nellis, Mary M 122 

Ness, Emma 547 

Newel, Kate 428 

1879 Nichol, William J 245 

O 

1914 O’Connor, Irene 661 

Osgood, Ruey A 554 

P 

Packham, Arthur 513 

Parker, Joseph 379 

Parnay, Leaman 350 

1849 Parsons, Rev. R. C 208 



MARRIED. No. 

Patterson, Jas. A 387 

Patterson, Rolland C. 555 

1852 Patterson, Wm 160 

Pearson, Jessie 535 

1855 Pembleton, George .... 770 

Pettit, Dr 94 

Pettit, 184 

1907 Pickett, Eddy 544 

1891 Porte, Maude 486 

1878 Porte, Sarah Maria.... 481 
1888 Powell, Elizabeth L... 474 

1890 Pratt, Rose Lillian 477 

Price, Frank 331 

Proctor, Jane 170 

Q 

1886 Quintus, John C 498 

R 

1901 Railton, Theresa 550 

1823 Reid, Jessie V 559 

1872 Ridley, Rev. John 468 

Robinson, Edith M. .. 490 

1883 Roberts, Helen A 546 

Robertson, Allie 434 

1880 Roderick, Lydia 154 

1917 Rose, Lloyd* E. 521 

1854 Ross, Mrs. Jane B 196 

1872 Roszel, Eleanor Jane.. 298 

1794 Roy, Mary 47 

Ryckman, Abram 209 

Ryckman, 353 

Ryckman, James 354 

Rymal, John W 429 

Ryerson, Rev. Wm 93 

S 

Salter, Geo. Vidal 273 

1921 Sanderson, Ernest .... 618 

Serby, James 360 

1895 Shaw, Millie 502 

Sheldon, Tillie 395 

Sheldon, Louisa 397 

1914 Siebenescher, Freda.. 602 



NAMES OF THOSE 'CONNECTED BY MARRIAGE 



155 



MARRIED. No. 

Simmons, J. H 281 

Sloter, Richard 46 

Smith, Cornelius 336 

Smith, Daniel 369 

Smith, Georgiana 252 

Smith, Harriet 116 

Smith, John 98 

Smith, John 137 

Smith, 132 

Smith, Mary 34 

Smith, Regenna 181 

Smith, Robert 142 

Smith, Thornton 146 

Smith, William 308 

Smith, Wilbur 442 

1876 Smith, William B 471 

1874 Smuck, John 538 

1829 Smuck, Charity 129 

1910 Southwood, Otho J 523 

1908 Spiers, Elizbth. A 481 

Spohn, Margaret 251 

1865 Spohn, Wesley 258 

1891 Sprockhoff, Hulda .... 276 

Sprowl, Robert 402 

1895 Sprowl, James 405 

Springer, Daniel 108 

1880 Stalker, Henry 495 

Stearns, Mary 199 

1907 Steer, Ethel 412 

1822 Stocking, Hannah .... 58 

1895 St. John, Nettie C 549 

1900 Stone, Thomas E 411 

Sutton, 506 

1894 Swackhammer,Marilla 404 

Swazie, Isaac 178 

Swayzie, Simcoe 182 

1872 Syder, James 401 

1842 Sykes, Mary 112 

Sykes, 271 

T 

1908 Tait, Roberta 516 

Tallman, Matthew .... 140 



MARRIED. No. 

1881 Tanner, Sarah 537 

Tansley, Edward 235 

Tapley, Miss 227 

1881 Tapp, Jessie 287 

Taylor, Solomon 109 

Taylor, Miss 507 

1781 Taylor, Hannah 824 

1827 Teeple, Mary 107 

Teeter, Mrs. Annie .... 86 
Teeter, Mary Ann .... 144 

1854 Teetzel, William 210 

1829 Thomas, Sarah 59 

1910 Thomas, Sarah M 547 

Tinline, Margaret 139 

V 

Van Dusen, Ernest .... 441 
1919 VanEvery, Mildred G. 525 
VanLoon, Thomas 303 

W 

1836 Wade, Emaline 756 

Waddell, Robert 70 

Walker, Robert 342 

1878 Walker, Edna 472 

1860 Walker, Mary Ann.... 297 

1798 Wardell, Deborah 49 

1798 Warded, Isaac 56 

Warner, Rev.R.L.,D.D. 443 
1818 Warren, Rev. Elijah.. 114 

Weaver, Reid 238 

1826 Williams, Cynthia A. 250 
Williams, Webber .... 344 

Wilson, Robt. M 271 

Wingrove, Thos 85 

Woodward, Henry 169 

Y 

Yokom, Rev. Wm 185 

Young, Eliza 751 

Young, Eliot 754 



Z 

Zimmerman, Adam .... 338 



INDEX III 



NAMES OF DESCENDANTS NOT BEARING 
THE NAME OF GRIFFIN. 



BORN B No. 

1888 Briggs, Estelle 802 

1884 Briggs, Harry D 801 

1915 Burns, Arthur Henry 706 
1913 Burns, Edith Griffin.. 705 

1921 Burns, Richard F 708 

1918 Burns, Roger Griffin.. 707 

C 

1857 Cobb, Alanson L. G... 554 
1862 Cobb, Jane Kentfield.. 555 

1908 Coon, Dorothy M 564 

1879 Coon, Ethel May 411 

1889 Coon, Hattie M 414 

1884 Coon, Jennie 413 

1878 Coon, Mabel 410 

1882 Coon, Marcus M 412 

1911 Coon, Marjorie 567 

1894 Coon, Ona Marguerita 415 

1909 Coon, Ralph 565 

1909 Coon, Victoria 566 

D 

1872 Darrow, Wm. Arthur 465 

1909 Day, Alethea 669 

1911 Day, Charles 670 

1913 Doherty, Bernard W. 656 

1916 Doherty, Doris Grace 658 

1914 Doherty, Mildred H... 657 

Donovan, Chas. M 568 



E 

1915 Errion, Ruth 



BORN B No. 

Freeman, Emma 506 

Freeman, Fannie 508 



Freeman, Ransom .... 507 
G 

1909 Gnaedinger, Constance 702 
1914 Gnaedinger, Gertrude 704 
1908 Gnaedinger, Margt. L. 701 

1910 Gnaedinger, Wm. G. 703 

H 



1909 Harmer, Constance 

Vivian 725 

1907 Harmer, Robt. G 724 

1881 Hastings-Bridge, A... 527 
1886 Hastings-Bridge, Isa- 
bel Frances 528 

1891 Hastings-Bridge, M... 529 

1874 Hatch, Alberta S 572 

1876 Hatch, Annie A 573 

1886 Hatch, David R 577 

1878 Hatch, Ernest E 574 

1881 Hatch, Frank Edgar.. 575 
1872 Hatch, Mary Louisa.. 571 

1885 Hatch, Nora May 576 

1787 Hill, Abraham 68 

1798 Hill, Bethiah 73 

1801 Hill, Cornelius 75 

1795 Hill, Jonathan 72 

1790 Hill, Jane 69 

1791 Hill, Mary 70 



696 



DESCEND ANTIS NOT BEARING THE NAME OE GRIEEIN 157 



BORN 

1812 Hill, Nathaniel 

1784 Hill, Richard 

1799 Hills, Smith 

1806 Hill, Smith 

1793 Hill, Solomon 

1784 Hill, William 

J 

1917 Jeffery, Geo. C 

1920 Jeffery, Roy Neil 

1910 Jenney, Edwinia 

1907 Jenney, John 

K 

Kay, Margaret 

L 

1860 Lawrence, Chas. O,.... 
1864 Lawrence, Clara M... 

1862 Lawrence, Cyrus E 

1858 Lawrence, Julia H 

1856 Lawrence, Mary E 

. 1866 Lawrence, Jane V 

Lindebury, Joseph .... 

Lindebury, Millie 

Lumley, Elijah 

Lumley, Hannah 

Lumley, Sarah 

M 

Meredith, Annie 

Meredith, Elizabeth.. 

Meredith, John 

Meredith, Mary 

Meredith, Richard .... 

Meredith, Wm 

1875 Montgomery, Arthur 

Morse, Enea Sara 

Morse, Jas. Harley.... 
1904 McClemont, Amy E... 
1913 McClemont, Constance 
1897 McClemont, Fred. M. 
1906 McClemont, Eleanor.. 



BORN No. 

1902 McClemont, Harry .... 648 
1902 McClemont, Herbert.. 647 

1910 McClemont, Melville:. 651 
1901 McClemont, Wm. P... 646 

N 

1857 Nellis, Frank E 496 

1855 Nellis, Georgiana L... 495 

1874 Nellis, Grace 499 

1861 Nellis, Jessie 497 

1862 Nellis, Nellie 498 

1880 Nichol, Frederick 466 

1886 Nichol, Sidney 467 

P 

Parsons, Catharine .... 443 

Parsons, Mary 442 

Patterson, Clifford C. 699 
1884 Patterson, Elizabeth.. 558 

1880 Patterson, Jas. R 556 

Patterson, John W. .. 389 

1882 Patterson, John H 557 

Patterson, Mary E 388 

1920 Patterson, Neliie P... 700 

Patterson, Norma 697 

Patterson, Richd. L... 698 
Patterson, Rolland C. 390 

Patterson, Wm. F 391 

1865 Pembleton, Bryant G. 786 

1870 Pembleton, Frank 787 

1862 Pembleton, Inez A..... 785 

1856 Pembleton, Rosetta.... 782 

1857 Pembleton, Theresa.... 783 

1860 Pembleton, Wm. E 784 

1911 Pickett, Hazel 673 

1922 Pickett, Mary Ruth.. 674 

1909 Pickett, Muriel 672 

1908 Pickett, Valeria 671 

Q 

1898 Quintus, Katrina 638 

R 

1879 Ridley, Edith 599 

1914 Rinker, Helen W. G... 731 



No. 

77 

66 

74 

76 

71 

67 

733 

734 

640 

639 

632 

293 

295 

294 

292 

291 

296 

135 

136 

760 

759 

758 

99 

101 

96 

98 

97 

100 

605 

552 

553 

649 

652 

645 

650 



158 DESCENDANT'S NOT BEARING THE NAME OF GRIFFIN 



BORN 

Rinker, Radford Lee.. 

1919 Rose, Evelyn 

1920 Rose, Shirley 

Rymal, Arthur 

Rymal, Edith 

Rymal, Gertie 

Rymal, Harry 

Rymal, Norman 

1863 Ryckman, Burwell G. 

Ryckman, John 

Ryckman, Martha 

1861 Ryckman, Mary A 

Ryckman, Solomon.... 

S 

1924 Sanderson, Mary G... 
1879 Salter, Emma Louise.. 
1877 Salter, Eva Maria 

1881 Salter, John S 

1876 Salter, Geo. Leonard.. 

1887 Salter, Raymond E 

1892 Salter, Richd. A 

1884 Salter, Walter F 

1884 Simmons, Ariel 

Smith, Abram 

Smith, Albert 

1832 Smith, David 

Smith, David 

Smith, Eileen 

Smith, Elias 0 

Smith, Elizabeth 

Smith, Elizabeth 

Smith, Harriet 

1882 Smith, Herbert 

Smith, Isaiah 

Smith, Isaac 

1879 Smith, Josephine 

Smith, Mary 

Smith, Mary Ann 

Smith, Mary Jane 

Smith, Matthew 

Smith, Nathaniel 

Smith, Rachel 



BORN No. 

Smith, Oscar 382 

Smith, Robert N 352 

Smith, Solomon 351 

Smith, William 378 



1907 Smoke, Ency Edith.... 738 

1896 Smoke, James Isaac.. 735 

1900 Smoke, Marjorie C 736 

1912 Southwood, Otho K... 655 

1897 Spohn, Bessie Eleanor 641 
Spohn, Edna Griffin.. 6444 



1867 Spohn, Harry 502 

Spohn, Herbert 644 

Spohn, Mary Margt... 642 

1870 Spohn, Nellie 503 

Spohn, Nora Evelyn.. 643 
Springer, Adaline .... 219 
Springer, Cordelia.... 214 

Springer, Eunice 215 

Springer, Isaac 217 

Springer, Margaret.. 216 

Springer, Richard 218 

1893 Stalker, Eleanor 637 

1883 Stalker, Harold G 635 

1881 Stalker, John Nellis.. 634 

1891 Stalker, Thos. A 636 

1903 Stone, Beulah 561 

1911 Stone, Ethel 563 

1901 Stone, Gretchen 560 

1911 Stone, Hattie 562 

T 

f 

Tallman, Annie 338 

Tallman, Daniel Culp 335 

Tallman, Deborah 340 

Tallman, Isaac 333 

Tallman, Jane 336 

Tallman, Mary 334 

Tallman, Margaret .... 342 
Tallman, Matthew .... 337 

Tallman, Oliver 341 

Tallman, Peter 339 

Taylor, Almira 220 



No. 

732 

653 

654 

592 

588 

589 

590 

591 

447 

445 

448 

446 

444 

723 

514 

513 

515 

512 

517 

518 

516 

526 

377 

383 

302 

346 

381 

349 

343 

379 

344 

607 

348 

347 

606 

301 

350 

376 

375 

380 

345 



DESCENDANTS NOT BEARING THE NAME OE GRIEEIN 159 



BORN 

Taylor, Margaret 

Taylor, Susan 

1857 Teetzel, Burwell E 

1863 Teetzel, Chas. W 

1866 Teetzel, Ida Josephine 

1855 Teetzel, Mary C 

1859 Teetzel, Wm. F 

V 

1917 Van Dusen, Raymond 
W 

Waddell, Eliza 

Waddell, Francis 

Waddell, Harriet 

Waddell, Jane 

Waddell, Julia 

Waddell, Marie 

Waddell, Margaret .. 

Waddell, Robert 

Wardell, Aaron 

Wardell, Abram 

Warded, Alborn 

Warded, Alfred 

Warded, Alfred ... 

Warded, Almedia 

Warded, Almeda 

Warded, Augusta 

Warded, Cynthia 

Warded, Cyrus 

Warded, Darius 

1801 Warded, Deborah 

Warded, Douglas 

Warded, Elias A 

Warded, Eliza 

Warded, Elizabeth .... 
Warded, Elizabeth .... 

Warded, Emma C 

Warded, Eva 

Warded, Frank 

Warded, George 

1818 Warded, Harriet 

1831 Warded, Hiram 



BORN 


No. 




Warded, Isaac 


306 




Warded, Isaac 


321 




Warded, Isaac 


362 




Warded, Isabel 


323 




Warded, Isaiah 


139 


1813 


Warded, Jacob 


143 


1834 Warded, Jacob 


305 




Warded, Jacob 


322 




Warded, James 


318 




Warded, James 


320 




Warded, Jane 


331 




Warded, John C 


314 




Warded, John 


324 




Warded, John 


359 




Warded, Joseph 


141 




Warded, Joseph 


311 




Warded, Manford 


374 




Warded, Mariam 


140 




Warded, Martha 


330 




Warded, Martha 


360 




Warded, Mary 


142 




Warded, Mary 


308 




Warded, Mary Ann.. 


329 




Warded, Mary 


354 




Warded, Mary Jane.. 


365 




Warded, Matthew .... 


310 


1815 


Warded, Nathaniel.... 


144 




Warded, Nathaniel.,.. 


366 




Warded, Orrin 


307 




Warded, Philip 


355 




Warded, Richard .... 


332 




W ardell, Silas 


363 


1803 


Warded, Solomon .... 


138 




Warded, Solomon 


316 




Warded, Solomon 


361 




Warded, Wallace 


357 




Warded, Warner 


372 




Warded, William 


309 




Warded, William 


328 


1863 


Weaver, Alberta 


455 


1872 


Weaver, Chas. L 


460 


1868 


Weaver, Harry G 


458 


1876 


Weaver, Linwood C. 


462 



No. 

222 

221 

450 

452 

453 

449 

451 

598 

162 

156 

160 

155 

161 

157 

159 

158 

368 

145 

370 

313 

325 

312 

364 

367 

369 

319 

356 

137 

326 

371 

358 

303 

353 

373 

317 

315 

327 

146 

304 



160 DESCENDANT'S NOT BEARING THE NAME OF GRIFFIN 



BORN No. 

1867 Weaver, Nina Ada.... 457 

1879 Weaver, Norma E 463 

1869 Weaver, Orton 459 

1882 Weaver, Zaida C 464 

1865 Weaver, Zenas 456 

1874 Weaver, Zoe 461 

Wilson, Amy 511 

1874 Wilson, Irvine C 509 

1877 Wilson, Robt. C. H... 510 



BORN No. 

Y 

Young, Daniel 766 

Young, Eliza 762 

Young, James 764 

Young, John 765 

Young, Nancy 761 

Young, Sarah 763 



LIST OF PORTRAITS 



FRONTISPIECE, J. A. GRIFFIN, THE COMPILER 
CYNTHIA ANN (WILLIAMS) 'GRIFFIN 
ARTHUR KENT GRIFFIN, M. A. 

MORREL GRIFFIN 
SMITH GRIFFIN 
MARY (HILL) GRIFFIN 
JUSTUS A. GRIFFIN 
JACOB GRIFFIN 
JAMES EDWARD GRIFFIN 
ELEANOR (FIELD) HILL 
NATHANIEL HILL 
BURWELL GRIFFIN 
SOLOMON GRIFFIN 
JAMES KENT GRIFFIN 
GEORGE DOUGLAS GRIFFIN 
WILLIAM SMITH GRIFFIN, D. D. 

RACHAEL ELEANOR (GRIFFIN) McNETT 

MEHITABLE (ACKARD) GRIFFIN 

RICHARD COL'L YE R GRIFFIN 

FREDERICK T. GRIFFIN 

HENRY AUGUSTUS GRIFFIN 

EDWIN CULVER GRIFFIN 

JAMES NELSON GRIFFIN 

CHARITY (SMUCK) GRIFFIN 

ANNE ELIZABETH GRIFFIN 

ALVIN DOUGLAS GRIFFIN 

GEORGE ERASTUS GRIFFIN AND FAMILY 

WATSON GRIFFIN, F. R. G. IS., F. R. S. A. 

GEORGIAN A (NELLIS) STALKER 

EMMA A. GRIFFIN 

HERBERT SPOHN GRIFFIN, B. A., M. D. 

WILLIAM ERIC GRIFFIN, MjC. 

SELWYN POWELL GRIFFIN, B. A. 

GEORGE CAMPBELL GRIFFIN 



§ 



162 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



164 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



MEMORANDA 



165 



166 



A PIONEER FAMILY 



MEMORANDA 



167 



168 



A PIONEER FAMILY